Fish Oils in Multivitamin

tarheels2323

Semi-Pro
I have been taking One-A-Day for Men for the past two and a half years or so, and have recently realized (while researching multivitamins and protein supplements) that it contains fish oil. First off, I feel stupid for not realizing this earlier.

Now, I'm allergic to fresh water fish (I think I'm still allergic, I haven't had fish since I was a child), but have experienced no negative reactions to the fish oil. Could this be because the dosage is so low, or is it just so minimal that I haven't noticed a reaction? Should I switch to a new vitamin without fish oil, or continue with the One-A-Day because fish oil is known to be beneficial?
 
You need to get your fatty acids somehow. If you can get them elsewhere, then go ahead. What may also be true is that whatever triggers your allergic reaction is simply not in fish oil in its pure form.
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
"Fresh water fish" is a bit too broad to describe an actual allergen. You may be allergic to some component of fish, and it's conceivable that this component is not found in the oil. (Allergens are not typically lipids but rather some more geometrically complicated molecules). And yes, the One-A-Day probably contains a negligble amount of fish oil (for which I don't believe a RDA minimum is established), but very small amounts are usually adequate to trigger at least some allergic reaction. As an example of how little of anything may be in the pill, many commercial multivitamins contain the RDA of vitamin E, which is only 35 International Units....most supplement afficianados want at least 200-400 Units of E.
 
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tricky

Hall of Fame
Not sure if I'd want my fish oil with a multivitamin. You'd have to make sure that the fish oil has been properly distilled to remove all mercury, cholesterol, extra vitamin A, etc., which is often not the case with the cheaper Costco brands.
 

In D Zone

Hall of Fame
Not sure if I'd want my fish oil with a multivitamin. You'd have to make sure that the fish oil has been properly distilled to remove all mercury, cholesterol, extra vitamin A, etc., which is often not the case with the cheaper Costco brands.
Hmmm... very interesting.

How do know about the quality of the costco brand? Any other recommendation or brand for fish oil supp.
 

tricky

Hall of Fame
First you check whether the container says the fish oil is "molecularly distilled" or "pharmaceutical grade" Usually they state this explicitly to demonstrate a higher quality product.

Then you check if the fish oil has any cholesterol or vitamin A. If so, then the container has been mislabeled and it's not high grade.
 

In D Zone

Hall of Fame
First you check whether the container says the fish oil is "molecularly distilled" or "pharmaceutical grade" Usually they state this explicitly to demonstrate a higher quality product.

Then you check if the fish oil has any cholesterol or vitamin A. If so, then the container has been mislabeled and it's not high grade.
Thanks for the tip!
 

Fee

Legend
If you are spending money on supplements, you might as well subscirbe to www.consumerlab.com. They regularly test vitamins and such to see if what's on the label is what's in the pill (there is no law in the US that says they have to match, so that 3000 mg Vitamin C tablet could just be 2000).

If you are taking supplements, make sure you are taking them with food so that they are properly absorbed into your system.
 
I would also agree that it might be best to get your fish oil (if you decide to take some) from a source other than your multivitamin. Fish oil should be molecularly distilled to remove any possible mercury or heavy metals from it. Nordic Naturals make great quality fish oil. You should also make sure that your multivitamin is of a good quality, since some of them just mass right through you completely undigested. Rainbow Light makes a great multivitamin that is food-based, which makes it absorb into the body more easily.
 
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