Fist pumping

halbrikj

Rookie
I believe the father of the fist pump is none other than Jimmy Connors, however, it now seems to be ubiquitous in virtually every sport. Regardless, I think fist pumping is a very bad idea, for a number of reasons:

1) it puts added pressure. After the fist pump, the fist pumper invariably realizes he will look like an idiot if he loses the next point (this is especially true if there are spectators). As a result, he puts added pressure on himself the next point, and maybe even the next several points. In doing so, he will in all likelihood play those points "not to lose," rather than to win - which means he will probably lose the next point(s).

2) the fist pump pumps your opponent. Ever get a boost of motivation after your opponent fist pumps? Yeah, we all have. Also, rest assured, the fist pumper's opponent will play the next point(s) to win, and not "not to lose," which means he will probably win the next point(s).

3) it doesn't do any good. Fist pumping doesn't give the pumper any added motivation, i.e. if he cares enough to fist pump, it follows that he cares enough to try his hardest without the fist pump...
 

Ihatetennis

Hall of Fame
Fist pumping is just a way to motivate yourself more I think

I'm no saint and after a tough point of a match that can really go either way I'll let out a let's go or something like that.

It's a way of asserting dominance if we look to primitive roots.

Just a way to show your opponent you're better. Even if that's not your conscious intention
 

halbrikj

Rookie
What if you pump your fist after you win a game? or a set? You don't have any pressure to win the next point.
I think you would. For example, if you fist pumped after breaking it would look funny to get broken back the very next game. How often do we see that very scenario played out in the pros?
Fist pumping is just a way to motivate yourself more I think

I'm no saint and after a tough point of a match that can really go either way I'll let out a let's go or something like that.

It's a way of asserting dominance if we look to primitive roots.

Just a way to show your opponent you're better. Even if that's not your conscious intention
I think it might show the opponent a lack of confidence, e.g. if a player knows he can/should beat his opponent, he'll unlikely feel a need to fist pump.
 

Ihatetennis

Hall of Fame
I think you would. For example, if you fist pumped after breaking it would look funny to get broken back the very next game. How often do we see that very scenario played out in the pros?


I think it might show the opponent a lack of confidence, e.g. if a player knows he can/should beat his opponent, he'll unlikely feel a need to fist pump.
Could do that, but in a tough 3 set match fist pumps and primal chest beating will come out.
 

Ihatetennis

Hall of Fame
but they don't have to. Look at all the greats of the past - Ashe, Laver, Borg, etc
It was more about skill back then though compared to straight up strength.

And many players don't need to, but some do and some don't

Different strokes for different folks
 

halbrikj

Rookie
It was more about skill back then though compared to straight up strength.

And many players don't need to, but some do and some don't

Different strokes for different folks
I just think as competitive as the sport is, whether you're playing 4.5 or professionally, you don't want to do anything to give your opponent any extra motivation, or throw any added pressure on yourself unnecessarily. "cooler heads (usually) prevail."
 

dlk

Hall of Fame
I admit, I occasionally do a fist pump after a big game winner, or say "yes." But I never, no never, say "come on."
 

dlk

Hall of Fame
I've been guilty of all of the above. not so much lately however, although admittedly, that partially because I'm seldom hitting winners....
For me "come on" is said when I miss an easy shot (of course the accent is on "on" with my name shorty following).

For you: The Good: you say "yes"; The Bad: you say "come on"; and The Ugly: you seldom hit winners:D
 

halbrikj

Rookie
For me "come on" is said when I miss an easy shot (of course the accent is on "on" with my name shorty following).

For you: The Good: you say "yes"; The Bad: you say "come on"; and The Ugly: you seldom hit winners:D
well played.
 
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navigator

Hall of Fame
I find fist-pumping and other exclamations in tennis bizarre unless there's money at stake (and even then I find it somewhat strange). It's a game...
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Fist pumping can sometimes motivate your opponent into playing a higher level of tennis.
 

penpal

Semi-Pro
I find the self-cheering bizarre as well, but that's probably because I'm old and grew up being taught that after you score a touchdown/a goal/or what have you, you should act like you've done it before and fully expect to do it again. In other words, no big display of excitement. Just walk to wherever you need to be to restart the game.

To this day, the opponents who intimidate me the most are those who don't display much emotion after hitting a really good shot. If they're pumping themselves up, I tend to assume they aren't as good as their last good shot would indicate.
 

sovertennis

Professional
I find the self-cheering bizarre as well, but that's probably because I'm old and grew up being taught that after you score a touchdown/a goal/or what have you, you should act like you've done it before and fully expect to do it again. In other words, no big display of excitement. Just walk to wherever you need to be to restart the game.

To this day, the opponents who intimidate me the most are those who don't display much emotion after hitting a really good shot. If they're pumping themselves up, I tend to assume they aren't as good as their last good shot would indicate.
I agree completely--gladiatorial self-congratulation strikes me as inherently weak, especially among ostensibly mature adults. (And when I play against someone who does it, it only makes me more determined).
 
I try to keep it classy. I spin my racket around and place the head of the racket against my groin. Then begin rocking the shaft and use the explosive dove being thrown motion at my opponents.
 

Captain Ron

Professional
I believe the father of the fist pump is none other than Jimmy Connors, however, it now seems to be ubiquitous in virtually every sport. Regardless, I think fist pumping is a very bad idea, for a number of reasons:

1) it puts added pressure. After the fist pump, the fist pumper invariably realizes he will look like an idiot if he loses the next point (this is especially true if there are spectators). As a result, he puts added pressure on himself the next point, and maybe even the next several points. In doing so, he will in all likelihood play those points "not to lose," rather than to win - which means he will probably lose the next point(s).

2) the fist pump pumps your opponent. Ever get a boost of motivation after your opponent fist pumps? Yeah, we all have. Also, rest assured, the fist pumper's opponent will play the next point(s) to win, and not "not to lose," which means he will probably win the next point(s).

3) it doesn't do any good. Fist pumping doesn't give the pumper any added motivation, i.e. if he cares enough to fist pump, it follows that he cares enough to try his hardest without the fist pump...
If only Jimmy could have had your insight ;)
Everyone is different, what puts pressure on you may pump me up and vice versa.
 

ZirkusAffe

Semi-Pro
what about the 'walk away fist pump' that's into your chest and not obvious to your opponent? that's the same thing? Connors father of the fist pump, but Jeter top of the dugout stairs of any 'said' game fist pump always annoyed me it was a fist pump from him on someone else's hit or play.. top of stairs for everyone to see fist pump.. pure awesomeness.

BTW my opponent executing and doing a fist pump after a winner might encourage me to get a little more motivated but the thing that really motivates me is a loud yell from an opponent after a shot, the fist pump could be a trigger for some to get fired up, my opponent yelling is the catalyst for me hungry to reel off some points.

If there is a fist pump for a shot going out or double faulting ok now your just a 100% ****** unless it's the end of the match and you just won.. then only 85% ******.. just kidding. long rally, back n forth, both with nice shots = I'm ok with the fist pump, but if you're fist pumping up a set and a break you're probably a d-bag.
 

dlk

Hall of Fame
what about the 'walk away fist pump' that's into your chest and not obvious to your opponent? that's the same thing? Connors father of the fist pump, but Jeter top of the dugout stairs of any 'said' game fist pump always annoyed me it was a fist pump from him on someone else's hit or play.. top of stairs for everyone to see fist pump.. pure awesomeness.

BTW my opponent executing and doing a fist pump after a winner might encourage me to get a little more motivated but the thing that really motivates me is a loud yell from an opponent after a shot, the fist pump could be a trigger for some to get fired up, my opponent yelling is the catalyst for me hungry to reel off some points.

If there is a fist pump for a shot going out or double faulting ok now your just a 100% ****** unless it's the end of the match and you just won.. then only 85% ******.. just kidding. long rally, back n forth, both with nice shots = I'm ok with the fist pump, but if you're fist pumping up a set and a break you're probably a d-bag.
IKR. The old "come-on" with a fist pump after a double fault is classic. I'm like "dude, you're a 3.5":eek::mad::confused:
 

Enga

Hall of Fame
I've rarely fist pumped... to me it seems like an instinct reaction. When I win what I thought was a tough and important point, I feel like I need to clench my fist.

I'm usually composed and silent on court, but sometimes, on those rare occasions I cant help myself.
 

TennisCJC

Legend
There used to be a guy who yelled and first pumped like Connors at USO in local league matches. He was hated by all.
 

ZirkusAffe

Semi-Pro
I've rarely fist pumped... to me it seems like an instinct reaction. When I win what I thought was a tough and important point, I feel like I need to clench my fist.

I'm usually composed and silent on court, but sometimes, on those rare occasions I cant help myself.
Exactly.. late in a match, held everything in finally go on top a break or hit a hard fought clean winner.. a tiny fist pump couldn't hurt, walk away close to the chest, subtle.
 

RVAtennisaddict

Professional
I don't fist pump, I walk over to their tennis bag or dominate leg and mark it with my urine.

TBH rarely celebrate/fist pump good shots or winning a point. I do fuss/grumble/lambaste myself after a bad/stupid shot.
 

cha cha

Professional
I remember taking my mother to see the Davis cup rubber against Kazakhstan back in the day.
We saw Berdych play Kukushkin, I believe, who is an epic level fist pumper.
I'll never forget what she said that day.: "If the guy pumps one more time, he will pop a vein."

As for me, fist pumping or any form of ostentatious celebrating is beneath me, and I will only resort to it in obvious irony. I expect respect from my opponents and that is what I treat them with.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
I've raised my arms in celebration of a fantastic shot. It's a celebration of a rare occurrence. i wouldn't fist pump or celebrate a mundane winning point. But if you make a sprinting, around the net post, scorching DTL winner, a little exclamation of joy should be allowed.

When to celebrate:
1) successfully executing a really high risk shot at a pivotal moment
2) Winning a super long rally with control of the point going back and forth
3) Winning an important match
4) Anytime your doubles partner makes a great shot

When not to celebrate:
1) After hitting an overhead on a sitter
2) winning a point from an unforced error or double fault (even if it was a big point)
3) hitting a winner on a short ball

When to apologize
1) Winning a point from a bad clay bounce or a net cord
2) winning a point by hitting the opponent
3) Winning a point by hitting an overhead near an opposing woman in mixed
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
I believe the father of the fist pump is none other than Jimmy Connors, however, it now seems to be ubiquitous in virtually every sport. Regardless, I think fist pumping is a very bad idea, for a number of reasons:

1) it puts added pressure. After the fist pump, the fist pumper invariably realizes he will look like an idiot if he loses the next point (this is especially true if there are spectators). As a result, he puts added pressure on himself the next point, and maybe even the next several points. In doing so, he will in all likelihood play those points "not to lose," rather than to win - which means he will probably lose the next point(s).

2) the fist pump pumps your opponent. Ever get a boost of motivation after your opponent fist pumps? Yeah, we all have. Also, rest assured, the fist pumper's opponent will play the next point(s) to win, and not "not to lose," which means he will probably win the next point(s).

3) it doesn't do any good. Fist pumping doesn't give the pumper any added motivation, i.e. if he cares enough to fist pump, it follows that he cares enough to try his hardest without the fist pump...
I love pumping my fist when my opponent looks totally sad or when he makes a easy mistake.
 
I've raised my arms in celebration of a fantastic shot. It's a celebration of a rare occurrence. i wouldn't fist pump or celebrate a mundane winning point. But if you make a sprinting, around the net post, scorching DTL winner, a little exclamation of joy should be allowed.

When to celebrate:
1) successfully executing a really high risk shot at a pivotal moment
2) Winning a super long rally with control of the point going back and forth
3) Winning an important match
4) Anytime your doubles partner makes a great shot

When not to celebrate:
1) After hitting an overhead on a sitter
2) winning a point from an unforced error or double fault (even if it was a big point)
3) hitting a winner on a short ball

When to apologize
1) Winning a point from a bad clay bounce or a net cord
2) winning a point by hitting the opponent
3) Winning a point by hitting an overhead near an opposing woman in mixed
Generally agree with this, although it's funny, when I used to hit with my father he never understood the tennis etiquette of apologizing for a won net cord point. He always felt like if the rules dictated that you can win the point all the same whether it hits the net first or not, why should you have to say sorry for it? Guess he sorta had a point. Do volleyball players apologize for winning points off the net?
 

cha cha

Professional
Of course we apologise. When the ball comes to a dead stop at the cord or completely changes the trajectory, we do. As any decent human being shoud.
But the level of over-motivation is incomparable in volleyball. Frenzy is in numbers.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Generally agree with this, although it's funny, when I used to hit with my father he never understood the tennis etiquette of apologizing for a won net cord point. He always felt like if the rules dictated that you can win the point all the same whether it hits the net first or not, why should you have to say sorry for it? Guess he sorta had a point. Do volleyball players apologize for winning points off the net?
I think it's less an apology than an acknowledgement that you won the point by fluke rather than skill. That being said, no one apologizes when they won a point by hitting the very outside of the line and that is most assuredly just as fluky.
 

Purestriker

Semi-Pro
I believe the father of the fist pump is none other than Jimmy Connors, however, it now seems to be ubiquitous in virtually every sport. Regardless, I think fist pumping is a very bad idea, for a number of reasons:

1) it puts added pressure. After the fist pump, the fist pumper invariably realizes he will look like an idiot if he loses the next point (this is especially true if there are spectators). As a result, he puts added pressure on himself the next point, and maybe even the next several points. In doing so, he will in all likelihood play those points "not to lose," rather than to win - which means he will probably lose the next point(s).

2) the fist pump pumps your opponent. Ever get a boost of motivation after your opponent fist pumps? Yeah, we all have. Also, rest assured, the fist pumper's opponent will play the next point(s) to win, and not "not to lose," which means he will probably win the next point(s).

3) it doesn't do any good. Fist pumping doesn't give the pumper any added motivation, i.e. if he cares enough to fist pump, it follows that he cares enough to try his hardest without the fist pump...
Seemed to work pretty well for Jordan, Tiger, Kobe and Serena.
 
I think it's less an apology than an acknowledgement that you won the point by fluke rather than skill. That being said, no one apologizes when they won a point by hitting the very outside of the line and that is most assuredly just as fluky.
True. And if you ask my dad, he might even say that he thinks winning a point on a net cord is actually the ultimate mark of skill lol.
 

CHillTennis

Semi-Pro
I personally don't have a problem with the opponent fist pumping.

After-all, it's fairly uncommon for me to go through an entire match without doing it at least one time.
 

Chalkdust

Rookie
When someone does a fist pump while playing against me I just find it amusing that winning a point against me in a rec match has any importance to them.
 

shamaho

Professional
I believe the father of the fist pump is none other than Jimmy Connors, however, it now seems to be ubiquitous in virtually every sport. Regardless, I think fist pumping is a very bad idea, for a number of reasons:

1) it puts added pressure. After the fist pump, the fist pumper invariably realizes he will look like an idiot if he loses the next point (this is especially true if there are spectators). As a result, he puts added pressure on himself the next point, and maybe even the next several points. In doing so, he will in all likelihood play those points "not to lose," rather than to win - which means he will probably lose the next point(s).

2) the fist pump pumps your opponent. Ever get a boost of motivation after your opponent fist pumps? Yeah, we all have. Also, rest assured, the fist pumper's opponent will play the next point(s) to win, and not "not to lose," which means he will probably win the next point(s).

3) it doesn't do any good. Fist pumping doesn't give the pumper any added motivation, i.e. if he cares enough to fist pump, it follows that he cares enough to try his hardest without the fist pump...
I'd agree only in one particular situation - if the first pump is done in the opponents face and done efusively ! then yes, I agree

if OTOH, it's done quietly with your back turned to the opponent and done to yourself as motivation , then I feel it's perfectly fine and recommended to get/keep you in a positive frame of mind! errrm... if done judiciously...not at every point like hummmm Kevin Anderson (although even that given particulars is open for debate).
 

socallefty

Hall of Fame
It seems like juniors and young adults in their twenties are the types who fist pump a lot or yell ‘Come ons’. The older rec players have long ago realized that winning or losing a point in a rec match doesn’t mean much in the bigger scheme of life.
 

jdawgg

Rookie
It seems like juniors and young adults in their twenties are the types who fist pump a lot or yell ‘Come ons’. The older rec players have long ago realized that winning or losing a point in a rec match doesn’t mean much in the bigger scheme of life.
Interesting, so you're saying someone who fist pumps or yells "Come on" thinks winning or losing a point in a rec match means a lot in the bigger scheme of life? You're overthinking all this.

Tennis is a sport. Some of us play to let out our competitive juices and that's fun for us. We start by talking trash to each other, then we fight to the death on the court and, finally, enjoy some beers and laughs afterwards, and that's just a practice match!
 
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