Fitness, key to the next level

Curious

Hall of Fame
#1
You know how much I wanted to improve my tennis. 6 years of tennis journey with some ups and downs, injuries and getting lost in details being the major setbacks.
I'm 100% sure now that it all boils down to fitness, having strong legs, feeling light and quick on the court without getting short of breath and fatigued.
I want to do something about it, something like this in the video.
What do you guys think? I know I'm getting old but never lost hope in improvement although slower than young people.
Because I had about 7 weeks without tennis my injuries seem to have gone away almost completely. And I thought now is the time to have a fitness program, say for 3-6 months. Doing something like what's shown in the video daily. Or any other suggestion?

 
#2
You know how much I wanted to improve my tennis. 6 years of tennis journey with some ups and downs, injuries and getting lost in details being the major setbacks.
I'm 100% sure now that it all boils down to fitness, having strong legs, feeling light and quick on the court without getting short of breath and fatigued.
I want to do something about it, something like this in the video.
What do you guys think? I know I'm getting old but never lost hope in improvement although slower than young people.
Because I had about 7 weeks without tennis my injuries seem to have gone away almost completely. And I thought now is the time to have a fitness program, say for 3-6 months. Doing something like what's shown in the video daily. Or any other suggestion?

It's a great place to start.

I like the 3Fs: footwork, fitness, focus [ie mental toughness], and spacing. I think these are foundational and that the great majority of players could improve their game by concentrating more on these and less on technique.

If you do get into a fitness program, I'd recommend starting slowly; make sure you stretch well. Nothing worse than being all gung-ho for getting in better shape and then injuring oneself in the process.
 

Curious

Hall of Fame
#3
If you do get into a fitness program, I'd recommend starting slowly; make sure you stretch well. Nothing worse than being all gung-ho for getting in better shape and then injuring oneself in the process.
Exactly. I have had enough of injuries. That's also one of the reasons why I want to do this fitness program, to prevent injuries.
 

Curious

Hall of Fame
#5
What is your height, weight, age, injury history of the last 12 months, ntrp level, and how many days are you playing tennis a week.
I'm 52. 6' 78kg. Never played official competitive tennis. I injured my knees, suffered long time from foot injury ( sesamoiditis to be specific ). Most of my injuries were from over doing it, playing beyond my fitness level.
 
#6
Exactly. I have had enough of injuries. That's also one of the reasons why I want to do this fitness program, to prevent injuries.
Yeah right ... if I did one of those squats Kevin did, I'm out for another 4 months. :eek:

I am doing simple squats like Megan did. It doesn't seem wise to go lower than knee level like Ian is. My right knee makes some crunchy noises doing the squats ... do you think that is a bad sign? :oops: No pain ... just crunch.

Edit:

170lbs ... that is good. I'm bouncing between 162-165lbs at 5' 8" ... would love to see 155-158lbs again by Spring.
 
#7
I'm 52. 6' 78kg. Never played official competitive tennis. I injured my knees, suffered long time from foot injury ( sesamoiditis to be specific ). Most of my injuries were from over doing it, playing beyond my fitness level.
Weight good, not that old yet (unless u played football or another high contact sport in your youth).

What kind of injury to your knees? Tendinitis?

Sorry about that foot condition, I had plantar fasciitis for a year and it was the worst year of my life.

Smart move taking the break, I would continue not playing tennis (or light hitting only, no running, 30 min max to start) and go through a 12-20 week course to strengthen and rehab to prevent your injuries from returning.

Your foot condition is outside my scope of knowledge, I’d recommend considering orthotics if that would help, and also 1 session with a physical therapist to design a fitness program to prevent these injuries from returning, good luck!
 
#9
You know how much I wanted to improve my tennis. 6 years of tennis journey with some ups and downs, injuries and getting lost in details being the major setbacks.
I'm 100% sure now that it all boils down to fitness, having strong legs, feeling light and quick on the court without getting short of breath and fatigued.
IMHO that video is nothing but them pumping out another video, the quality is very low in terms on actually doing anything for your fitness. You are better off going to the track and running a mile.

You definitely should be optimistic cause I play with some 40-50 year olds and their singles game is still quite high level, so getting older doesn't mean you have to decline. If you wanna get stronger legs, try squatting even body squats but try to touch your butt as close to the ground as you can, don't just go parallel.

Find a partner who is willing to rally with you. There are people I play games with and others who only enjoy rallying, depending on the person both can be equally beneficial. I gained my strength through playing, didn't do any extra stuff outside but if you feel like you are physically weak then you can incorporate some strength exercises.

Try doing like 100 body squats, 3-4 sets of 20-25 reps push up, and jumping rope without stopping for 4-5 minutes straight and rest 1-2 minutes and do the jumping rope again for another 2-3 times.

I think leg strength is underestimated in general and I definitely underestimated it early on but its true, you must have strong legs conditioned for play. Doesn't mean your legs have to be body building large but strong enough to carry your body weight and move with agility and power without getting fatigued.
 
#10
Exactly. I have had enough of injuries. That's also one of the reasons why I want to do this fitness program, to prevent injuries.
They did not really show a fitness program, it was only 3 very amateurish exercises. Watch a bunch of tennis fitness videos and take some inspiration from them, create your own plan according to your own body and goals.

I'm 52. 6' 78kg. Never played official competitive tennis. I injured my knees, suffered long time from foot injury ( sesamoiditis to be specific ). Most of my injuries were from over doing it, playing beyond my fitness level.
Your knees need strong muscles surrounding it to keep it stable. Leg strength will help your knees. I've seen people your age play very well.
 
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#12
I'm 52. 6' 78kg. Never played official competitive tennis. I injured my knees, suffered long time from foot injury ( sesamoiditis to be specific ). Most of my injuries were from over doing it, playing beyond my fitness level.
I have learned for me exercises have to be simple, quick and at my house or I won't stick with them. The body weight squats and calf raises are good examples.

After my hamstring injuries, I like the following 3 exercises. The one he calls the golfer stretch (Russian deadlift @8:30) is easy. The yoga ball @6:30 is great, but need to pull out the mat. :p The nordic curl @10:30 is the one most believe is the best hamstring reinjury prevention (eccentric), but you have to get creative to do it by yourself.

IMO ... we all should be doing squats of some kind after 50 (wish I had got the memo), and probably additional hamstring exercises.

 
#13
Yeah right ... if I did one of those squats Kevin did, I'm out for another 4 months. :eek:

I am doing simple squats like Megan did. It doesn't seem wise to go lower than knee level like Ian is. My right knee makes some crunchy noises doing the squats ... do you think that is a bad sign? :oops: No pain ... just crunch.
"Milk on Rice Krispies" crunch? "Chewing ice" crunch? "Eating carrots" crunch? C'mon: you gotta be more scientific than just "crunchy".

I can do the first half of Kevin's squat. Definitely not the second unless I was very warmed up.
 
#15
"Milk on Rice Krispies" crunch? "Chewing ice" crunch? "Eating carrots" crunch? C'mon: you gotta be more scientific than just "crunchy".

I can do the first half of Kevin's squat. Definitely not the second unless I was very warmed up.
I will pay closer attention and give more crunch detail... I think there might also be a pop :eek: in the mix. I could strap my iPhone to my knee and post the video/audio. My contribution to ttw knee science.
 
#16
I completely agree that fitness is the key. Being in better shape allows you to move faster, less stress on your joints and decreases your chance of injury. My goal during the winter is to drop 15-20 lbs before the the next tennis season starts.

edit: I missed the part about suggestions

I'm a huge workout at home type person. I am really into Beachbody HIIT workouts like Insanity Max 30, Asylum, etc. I think any HIIT workout that you enjoy would be beneficial to playing tennis. HIIT workouts are usually total body and require quick movements both laterally and vertically. A lot of these conditions are utilized on the tennis courts. I highly recommend these style of workouts because the are usually shorter and more effective than running or going to gym hours for hours.
 
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#17
I will pay closer attention and give more crunch detail... I think there might also be a pop :eek: in the mix. I could strap my iPhone to my knee and post the video/audio. My contribution to ttw knee science.
My professional opinion is that the "crunch" is more like a "crackle". Then all we're missing is the "snap" and mystery solved.
 

Curious

Hall of Fame
#18
IMHO that video is nothing but them pumping out another video, the quality is very low in terms on actually doing anything for your fitness. You are better off going to the track and running a mile.
That was just an example. There are quite a few similar videos, exercise programs as you say.
 

Curious

Hall of Fame
#19
Smart move taking the break, I would continue not playing tennis (or light hitting only, no running, 30 min max to start) and go through a 12-20 week course to strengthen and rehab to prevent your injuries from returning.
That's exactly what I was thinking of doing including not playing tennis.
Knee injury was quite serious, torn cartilage forming a flap that clicks at every step while walking. No surgery recommended, it seems to be smoothing itself out. The healing capacity of human body is amazing.
 

Curious

Hall of Fame
#20
I know my legs are not strong enough and need to work on it specifically but what's covered in this video is pretty good for cardio fitness/stamina.

 
#21
That's exactly what I was thinking of doing including not playing tennis.
Knee injury was quite serious, torn cartilage forming a flap that clicks at every step while walking. No surgery recommended, it seems to be smoothing itself out. The healing capacity of human body is amazing.
I have played very little winter tennis (3 months) the last several years. I have noticed it gets harder to start up again in Spring, particularly related to serving. Perhaps some ball machine hitting and serve a basket of balls occasionally.
 
#22
I know my legs are not strong enough and need to work on it specifically but what's covered in this video is pretty good for cardio fitness/stamina.

Funny accent ... Alabama? :-D:-D:-D

So you have flapping popping parts in your knee, and you are going to jog? I have decided my jogging days are over. My 50lb cheap fat tire gearless Walmart bike is now my jogging. That reminds me ... time to start riding. I got it for winters, and missed last winter because of hamstrings.
 

Curious

Hall of Fame
#23
Funny accent ... Alabama? :-D:-D:-D

So you have flapping popping parts in your knee, and you are going to jog? I have decided my jogging days are over. My 50lb cheap fat tire gearless Walmart bike is now my jogging. That reminds me ... time to start riding. I got it for winters, and missed last winter because of hamstrings.
Aussie accent may sound funny to you but I missed it so much while I was in London recently!:) Why do the British speak like that?!

I don't know if I can run again but having almost no pain at the moment after this break gives me hope.
 
#24
Aussie accent may sound funny to you but I missed it so much while I was in London recently!:) Why do the British speak like that?!

I don't know if I can run again but having almost no pain at the moment after this break gives me hope.
Tell me about it. Every time we watch a brit tv series or movie, I am replaying constantly trying to figure out wtf they just said. :cool:
 
#27
Aussie accent may sound funny to you but I missed it so much while I was in London recently!:) Why do the British speak like that?!

I don't know if I can run again but having almost no pain at the moment after this break gives me hope.
I dont think running woild be very good for tennis. Sprinting or other hiit training would work your fitness. Ideal maybe on grass for low impact? Barefoot to build your calf and foot muscles more? Sounds like fitness is one thing, and "preventive strengthening" another. Yoga would be good for that, and just life in general
 

Curious

Hall of Fame
#28
I dont think running woild be very good for tennis. Sprinting or other hiit training would work your fitness. Ideal maybe on grass for low impact? Barefoot to build your calf and foot muscles more? Sounds like fitness is one thing, and "preventive strengthening" another. Yoga would be good for that, and just life in general
I'm not sure if you can have a great anaerobic (sprinter) capacity without having a good aerobic(marathoner) cardio fitness first.
 
#32
That's exactly what I was thinking of doing including not playing tennis.
Knee injury was quite serious, torn cartilage forming a flap that clicks at every step while walking. No surgery recommended, it seems to be smoothing itself out. The healing capacity of human body is amazing.
In this case to aid in your body’s self healing, clean up your diet as much as possible. No more refined sugars, cut out processed food, eat more healthy fats, and to maximize healing try adding 8-12 oz of bone broth to your diet.

I would also recommend an intermittent fasting diet. Start with an 8 hour feeding window and 16 hour “no calorie” daily.

This could help your body’s natural “autophagy” processes to accelerate, in which case your torn cartilage may heal quicker.
 

Curious

Hall of Fame
#33
In this case to aid in your body’s self healing, clean up your diet as much as possible. No more refined sugars, cut out processed food, eat more healthy fats, and to maximize healing try adding 8-12 oz of bone broth to your diet.

I would also recommend an intermittent fasting diet. Start with an 8 hour feeding window and 16 hour “no calorie” daily.

This could help your body’s natural “autophagy” processes to accelerate, in which case your torn cartilage may heal quicker.
Trying to eat healthy. And no animal products as a matter of principle.
 
#34
Trying to eat healthy. And no animal products as a matter of principle.
Fair enough, well my wife is a vegetarian and she makes a vegan “bone broth,” basically just boils the nutrients out of different veggies such as ginger, garlic, onions, celery, kale, ect... then drinks it throughout the week.
 
#35
I'm not sure if you can have a great anaerobic (sprinter) capacity without having a good aerobic(marathoner) cardio fitness first.
Really? I think they are two seperate types of fitnesses. One is to keep going forever at a slow pace, the other is how fast you recover between points (and how fast you can move and react etc during said point).

For tennis the latter is beneficial much more so

But either way preventative strengthening stuff like yoga and walking is invaluable
 
#36
Trying to eat healthy. And no animal products as a matter of principle.
No animal products? Hows your protein intake? As an athlete you probably would optimise on 120g+ a day. Keep in mind non animal sources are only like 15% absorbable, compared to animal sources around 30%. One thing to look into could be an essential amino acid supplement. You can buy it in bulk pretty cheap online. It has over 80% absorbability
 

Curious

Hall of Fame
#37
Really? I think they are two seperate types of fitnesses. One is to keep going forever at a slow pace, the other is how fast you recover between points (and how fast you can move and react etc during said point).

For tennis the latter is beneficial much more so

But either way preventative strengthening stuff like yoga and walking is invaluable
Separate but related I would think.
 
#38
You know how much I wanted to improve my tennis. 6 years of tennis journey with some ups and downs, injuries and getting lost in details being the major setbacks.
I'm 100% sure now that it all boils down to fitness, having strong legs, feeling light and quick on the court without getting short of breath and fatigued.
I want to do something about it, something like this in the video.
What do you guys think? I know I'm getting old but never lost hope in improvement although slower than young people.
Because I had about 7 weeks without tennis my injuries seem to have gone away almost completely. And I thought now is the time to have a fitness program, say for 3-6 months. Doing something like what's shown in the video daily. Or any other suggestion?

I have a bad knee and hip so can't do squats so I do pilates instead. Really great for game and being pain free after matches but expensive to do every week
 

Curious

Hall of Fame
#39
No animal products? Hows your protein intake? As an athlete you probably would optimise on 120g+ a day. Keep in mind non animal sources are only like 15% absorbable, compared to animal sources around 30%. One thing to look into could be an essential amino acid supplement. You can buy it in bulk pretty cheap online. It has over 80% absorbability
I think I'm getting enough protein from plant sources but being vegan to me is more important than playing tennis anyway.
 

IowaGuy

Hall of Fame
#40
I have played very little winter tennis (3 months) the last several years. I have noticed it gets harder to start up again in Spring, particularly related to serving. Perhaps some ball machine hitting and serve a basket of balls occasionally.
Federer says that he practices his serve even when he's on family vacation, in order to stay dialed in.

He said that Edberg did the same.
 
#42
Really? I think they are two seperate types of fitnesses. One is to keep going forever at a slow pace, the other is how fast you recover between points (and how fast you can move and react etc during said point).

For tennis the latter is beneficial much more so

But either way preventative strengthening stuff like yoga and walking is invaluable
Separate but related I would think.
If I could only pick one for tennis, it would be the sprints ... but have seen good/different results with both.

I have never been a good distance runner, but very fast at sprints. In elementary and high school, one of the fastest in 50 and 100 yard dash, but terrible trying to run a mile.

Same when I started playing tennis tournaments mid-20s ... probably could barely jog 2 miles. But I played a ton of singles in the heat, and on occasion would run sprints at a school track. I could play a 2.5 hr singles match in 95+ degrees high humidity... often two in same day. STILL ... would have struggled with 2 mile jog.

Flash forward to age 55 ... got back to mid-20s tournament weight and decided I would try and run/jog enough to "not suck". Took over a month to get past jogging to the 2 mile mark ... but got to where I could run the 3.3 mile/5k running path 2-3 times a week. Still not a good jogger ... took me a long time to finally get under 30 minutes. But it's the best condition I think I was ever in. The difference on the tennis court was amazing. I went from the guy gassed after an hour singles in the heat, to literally feeling great after 3 hours of mid-day summer tennis. The kicker was my yearly blood tests. Doc looked at it ... looked at me and asked what I had done. Told him ... tuna fish, almonds, tomatoes, eggs ... 5k twice a week. His response ... keep doing it. I did not. :cry:

So for me, recovering between points was not about how much I was jogging. How much I suffered/sweat for two hours of tennis ... yeah ... jogging.
 
#43
You know how much I wanted to improve my tennis. 6 years of tennis journey with some ups and downs, injuries and getting lost in details being the major setbacks.
I'm 100% sure now that it all boils down to fitness, having strong legs, feeling light and quick on the court without getting short of breath and fatigued.
Right there with you and 100% agree.

Interestingly, back in 2016 I was doing a lot of playing and good, consistent training. The irony is, I ended up herniating a disc in my neck trying to do squats 'like I used to', which has healed for the most part but still limites some momvement. My suggestion for the over 50 crowd is not to push too much or over train, but also to have at least half your training forcus on dynmaic stretching and felxibility. Adding yoga or such will be key for me this year.
 
#44
Separate but related I would think.
My stringer was a very good high school and tournament tennis player when he was young. His girlfriend competes in triathlons, so he does some training (mainly bike) with her. We were talking about tennis conditioning, and he made the comment that a triathlete would be wiped out in a hard 2 hour tennis match because the stopping and cutting. Different kind of conditioning.
 
#45
Right there with you and 100% agree.

Interestingly, back in 2016 I was doing a lot of playing and good, consistent training. The irony is, I ended up herniating a disc in my neck trying to do squats 'like I used to', which has healed for the most part but still limites some momvement. My suggestion for the over 50 crowd is not to push too much or over train, but also to have at least half your training forcus on dynmaic stretching and felxibility. Adding yoga or such will be key for me this year.
I didn't see many tennis injuries in the under 50 age group. After 50 ... it was mainly knees, hips and backs that took players out of tennis. Not many of my past USTA teammates and club members still playing. Many of those still playing are only playing because of knee replacements. I have had friends quit tennis and just live with worn out knee that was still good enough for golf. :p I have seen some get shoulder surgery, but those never seem to knock anyone permanently out of tennis. Backs get many ... and that does end their tennis. I know one that had to quit because of wrist. The knee replacement guys all come back running like they did before ... or better. Hips ... not so much ... not much movement/range. I would think the number one thing to do if you wanted to play tennis as a senior is keep the weight off all those years. But I have a friend that has been at ideal weight his entire life ... ex-college baseball player ... both knees have been replaced. I was 15-25lbs heavy for a long stretch of middle age tennis (ByeByeSingles ... HelloDoubles:mad:) ... and not had any knee, hip or back issues (probably will jinx myself typing that). No gym leg work ... figured legs were getting enough from all the running on the tennis court. For me ... still think that was true. The only thing I would have changed in hindsight is add body weight squats from 50 on ... and maybe glute bridges. I think that @$$ muscle is more important than I realized.

Edit: I would do back extensions for all of tennis years
 
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#49
One of the best videos posted on the forums!:giggle:
You would have enjoyed the attaching creativity. What I won't do for ttw knee science. I would attach the phone to my other knee that I don't think makes any noise to see if most of those sounds are normal ... but then ... maybe the second knee ain't normal either. Then you have to ask ... what is normal for a 60 year old knee that has been on the tennis court for 45 of those years. 8-B
 
#50
Snap 53 YO and the knees r going. Just general inflammation. My bloody tennis partner makes us play on hard court. I d say add Superman's for back. Clamshells r good for hips.
 
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