Forehand Volley Help

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Machspeed, May 31, 2018.

  1. Machspeed

    Machspeed New User

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    Hey friends, I’m in want for some help/advise with my forehand tennis volley, which is just killing my doubles game as I frequently frame the ball. I don’t know why, but at the net I will hold the racquet in the desired continental grip for a volley, however when I have to volley forehand, I will subconsciously rotate the racquet to a forehand grip. When I do this, I also use my wrist to put power on the hit. In this mess, I not only struggle to hit the ball, I've also injured my wrist. I don't know what it is but for some reason, that continental grip just does not feel normal to me for a forehand volley. What advice would you give to help me get around this and utilize the proper grip and form? Thanks!
     
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  2. Steady Eddy

    Steady Eddy Hall of Fame

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    Use your forehand grip.

    Some very adept volleyers have been grip switchers. I never could volley with that continental grip. I switched back many years ago, and I'm glad I did.
     
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  3. Friedman Whip

    Friedman Whip Semi-Pro

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    Get the correct grip on the racket and then put duct or masking tape around your hand and the racket so that you can't shift your hand. Or you can wear a glove and glue it onto the racket using the correct grip. Practice this way until you don't have to do it any more. And stop swinging at the ball with a bunch of wrist action for crying out loud.
     
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  4. S&V-not_dead_yet

    S&V-not_dead_yet Legend

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    FH grip would be tough on low volleys, no?

    I switch to an Eastern FH grip when the ball is very close to my body and I fail to take it as a BH: it allows me to make easier contact without contorting my wrist so much.
     
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  5. S&V-not_dead_yet

    S&V-not_dead_yet Legend

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    Are you hitting the same part of the frame all of the time or does it vary?

    Hit a few hundred FH volleys with a slow feed. Before each one, check your grip and move back to Conti when needed.

    Are you using your off hand to rotate? If so, stop using your off hand on the racquet; force yourself to just use your dominant hand.

    It basically comes down to repetition.

    Check out this vid from Essential Tennis [one of many informative teachers on the internet]:

     
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  6. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly G.O.A.T.

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    The standard continental grip is something of a compromise for many/most FH volleys. It requires the wrist to be laid back quite a bit (primarily wrist extension). Many find this wrist position to be rather unnatural.

    The continental grip is quite suitable for most players for low volleys on both the Fh and Bh sides. Many player find a semi-continental grip is more suitable for high and medium-high Fh (and Bh) volleys. The semi-continental grip is a 2.5 grip -- halfway between a standard continental (a 2 grip) and an eastern Fh grip (a 3 grip).
     
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  7. Chadillac

    Chadillac Legend

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    If your aiming for the middle and hitting the bottom of the frame, imagine the top is your new sweet spot because your chopping. If your hitting the top, aim for the bottom of the frame.

    If the top of your wrist is burning, your dropping the racket head, if the bottom hurts, your flicking too much (fake power)
     
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  8. skiracer55

    skiracer55 Hall of Fame

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    Learn the Conti grip, not just on your volley. What you describe is the reason why (1) your wrist is hosed and (2) you can't
    hit a forehand volley. Find somebody who knows what they're doing, and straighten out your grip and technique. Then..commit to making the change. Don't worry about whether or not you win the next point...who cares? If you win, you're still not going to Wimbledon, and if you lose...nobody's going to shoot you, right? So do the right thing, and all things will come to you. As Dave Hodge, my former coach (and he was a great volleyer), ATP player, and coach in Team Australia used to say "The best volleyers in the world take very little backswing...and they take too much backswing...

    QUOTE="Machspeed, post: 12326629, member: 75670"]Hey friends, I’m in want for some help/advise with my forehand tennis volley, which is just killing my doubles game as I frequently frame the ball. I don’t know why, but at the net I will hold the racquet in the desired continental grip for a volley, however when I have to volley forehand, I will subconsciously rotate the racquet to a forehand grip. When I do this, I also use my wrist to put power on the hit. In this mess, I not only struggle to hit the ball, I've also injured my wrist. I don't know what it is but for some reason, that continental grip just does not feel normal to me for a forehand volley. What advice would you give to help me get around this and utilize the proper grip and form? Thanks![/QUOTE]
     
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  9. Curious

    Curious Hall of Fame

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    What is the extent of backswing your coach is happy with?!
     
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  10. S&V-not_dead_yet

    S&V-not_dead_yet Legend

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    Obviously "less than very little". ;)
     
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  11. zalive

    zalive Hall of Fame

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    This is a symptom that you contact the ball too behind with your FH. Why is this a symptom? Framing comes from inability to maintain the visual contact with the ball right before and through the contact. And this inability comes from the contact point being behind, as ball is too fast to follow it with your eyes when you have to turn your head sideways to follow the ball through. So you need to stick your racquet in front of you when volleying, both FH and BH (plus turn your shoulders too), but for FH it's less natural as your arm is being behind. This is completely unlike groundstrokes, so groundstrokes habits on volleying don't work well. Once you shift the contact position forward you'll notice you frame volleys much less. Also, don't use too much swing and big takeback for volleying, you need small takeback. Bigger takeback is only needed when incoming ball is really, really slow. In which case you have all the time needed to make it. So the conclusion is natural, volleying prep is with your racquet in front of you, holding it with your other hand by the throat.
     
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  12. samarai

    samarai Semi-Pro

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    we really need to see your volleys to offer any advice. what i used to do was use too much wrist and shoulder action and almost treated it like a ground stroke. once i corrrected that problem my forehand volleys became so much more consistent. elbows now stays bent and stays attached to my body .
     
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  13. Dou

    Dou New User

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    somewhere between C and E is fine... no need to have a pure C grip for the fh volley.

    really need to see a video to know exactly what's wrong though... back swing, wrist position, swing path, all can be the potential problem... but the most common problem I see is the swing path.

    good news is that volleys are such simple strokes, they are much easier to fix than groundies.
     
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  14. fuzz nation

    fuzz nation G.O.A.T.

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    The continental grip is something that probably only comes with repetition and it sounds like you're having difficulty with taking that leap of faith. Understandable - that's a strange grip to embrace for anybody who is much more at home with more of a forehand grip. I'm sort of spoiled in this department though, because it was the first thing I learned as a kid. Instead of talking about the grip though, I'll recommend that you get after making more power with your legs and core to drive your volleys. That should let your wrist generally stay more firm and quiet through those shots.

    One drill you can try for yourself with either a backboard or a willing partner is to hit some low-speed volleys while holding your racquet up at the top of its grip. Maybe your first two fingers will be on the throat of the racquet while your ring and pinky fingers are on the top of the grip. Get your grip position in the neighborhood of continental and then do some easy bumps against the backboard or have your partner hand feed you some balls to give you some reps. Try hitting several forehand volleys in a row and then several backhand volleys so that you can dial in your move on each side.

    Holding the racquet up at the top of the grip like this will usually restrict us from using too much arm and wrist action with a volley. Much of the drive through the ball now comes from a forward lean through contact along with just a little trunk rotation - not nearly as much as we typically use for a ground stroke. When those big muscle groups can carry the racquet through the ball in a strong, compact drive, the arm and wrist will probably feel like they're simply holding the racquet still as the lower half moves through contact.

    Ever heard the term "volley with your feet"? Here you go. Much easier to make solid and consistent contact in the sweet spot when the arm is more "holding the racquet still" instead of waving at the ball. The continental grip is a volleying essential, but if you also learn to volley with your legs and movement, that impulse to wave at the ball should disappear.
     
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  15. skiracer55

    skiracer55 Hall of Fame

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    Turn your shoulders, step forward to the ball...and watch the ball onto your racket face...do that, and the backswing will take care of itself...

     
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  16. Dou

    Dou New User

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    catch the ball and squeeze it. the harder you squeeze, the deeper the volley. too simple.
     
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  17. golden chicken

    golden chicken Semi-Pro

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    Stand with your heels against the fence. Have someone feed you volleys. If you hit the fence with your racket, you screwed up.
     
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  18. TennisCJC

    TennisCJC Legend

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    1. using a C/E hybrid is OK
    2. keep the racket head above the wrist at contact
    3. do not take the racket back beyond the hitting shoulder
    4. lay the wrist back to turn the shoulders a bit to get ready
    5. do not use wrist movement at contact instead the pivot point for the volley is the shoulder
    6. working on the concepts of catching the ball with your strings.
    7. there is some downwards motion and some outside to inside across motion on a volley, but limit the swing to a very very very very very very small movement of the hand - you can hit crisp FH volleys with decent pace and move the hand 6 to 12 inches. Remember that movement comes from the shoulder pivot point.
     
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