Full body cramps?

antony

Professional
I see plenty of threads on localized cramps. Today after winning the first two matches in the 3.5 singles division of my first tournament, I had beginning cramps in my calves as the first match of my doubles division was starting. I pushed through it, and went down to the ground in the second set after the cramps spread through my entire legs. Very painful. They gave me a 15 minute reprieve, I came back pretty strong mentally minding the physical limitations and held my service game, but then went down again, this time much worse. Full body cramps. Abdominal muscles, foot muscles, every muscle that was inadvertently activated or otherwise started cramping. Eventually even my jaw muscles started cramping. Can’t think of a time my body was in worse physical pain. Laid on the court writhing in pain and screaming for like 20 minutes without being to move. Everyone tried to help and were wonderful. Had to withdraw out of both divisions after that (was a finalist in singles 3.5).

Never had cramps like this before. Anyone?
Electrolyte loss? My muscles were not sore or anything.

 

megamind

Legend
Usually for cramps for like one part of your body, I'd say make sure to drink water with electrolytes during changeovers. This seems a little more intense though

Since this is full body, I am not a doctor, but perhaps it would help to get bloodwork done to see if you have any nutritient deficiencies, or even consult with a doctor!

Hope you feel better!
 

antony

Professional
Usually for cramps for like one part of your body, I'd say make sure to drink water with electrolytes during changeovers. This seems a little more intense though

Since this is full body, I am not a doctor, but perhaps it would help to get bloodwork done to see if you have any nutritient deficiencies, or even consult with a doctor!

Hope you feel better!
I do now, thank you. My mom drove me and my car back to her house (I actually cramped out again during the drive, so good I didn’t drive), made me an epsom salt bath, and then made me food. Bless her heart

Re: nutrient deficiency, that’s a really good idea. I eat pretty well but I’ve also been playing a good amount and using those nutrients up.
One of my coaches who currently plays in college has had cramps and told me last week that he was going to do a sweat test. I never thought much of it because I didn’t really have cramps myself, but now I understand
 
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S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
I see plenty of threads on localized cramps. Today after winning the first two matches in the 3.5 singles division of my first tournament, I had beginning cramps in my calves as the first match of my doubles division was starting. I pushed through it, and went down to the ground in the second set after the cramps spread through my entire legs. Very painful. They gave me a 15 minute reprieve, I came back pretty strong mentally minding the physical limitations and held my service game, but then went down again, this time much worse. Full body cramps. Abdominal muscles, foot muscles, every muscle that was inadvertently activated or otherwise started cramping. Eventually even my jaw muscles started cramping. Can’t think of a time my body was in worse physical pain. Laid on the court writhing in pain and screaming for like 20 minutes without being to move. Everyone tried to help and were wonderful. Had to withdraw out of both divisions after that (was a finalist in singles 3.5).

Never had cramps like this before. Anyone?
Electrolyte loss? My muscles were not sore or anything.

Not full body but I have had the "cascade" cramp where a cramp in one place causes me to contort my body to compensate which then causes a cramp somewhere else.

I've heard anecdotes that pickle juice short circuits cramps but there's no comprehensive data.

How were the weather conditions? Specifically, the humidity? And was this the first time you've played in this condition this year?
 

antony

Professional
Not full body but I have had the "cascade" cramp where a cramp in one place causes me to contort my body to compensate which then causes a cramp somewhere else.

I've heard anecdotes that pickle juice short circuits cramps but there's no comprehensive data.

How were the weather conditions? Specifically, the humidity? And was this the first time you've played in this condition this year?
that cascade cramp is what happened.

Hot and humid. I’ve been playing in these conditions this summer, however I usually don’t play matches back to back to back in this weather. I usually get food and a nap in between my playing sessions. A lady gave me pickle juice but it was so gross haha. I had a few tiny sips. I didn’t finish it but I’ll keep it in case it ever happens again.

i asked my trainer about how to prevent these cramps in the future and he said, “Pedialyte”
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
Vinegar and water as the Romans did it BITD. I do not know if lemon juice will also work. I use about 5 drops/0.5 teaspoon of white vinegar per pint of water. I only do this is I know the weather will be hot.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
I see plenty of threads on localized cramps. Today after winning the first two matches in the 3.5 singles division of my first tournament, I had beginning cramps in my calves as the first match of my doubles division was starting. I pushed through it, and went down to the ground in the second set after the cramps spread through my entire legs. Very painful. They gave me a 15 minute reprieve, I came back pretty strong mentally minding the physical limitations and held my service game, but then went down again, this time much worse. Full body cramps. Abdominal muscles, foot muscles, every muscle that was inadvertently activated or otherwise started cramping. Eventually even my jaw muscles started cramping. Can’t think of a time my body was in worse physical pain. Laid on the court writhing in pain and screaming for like 20 minutes without being to move. Everyone tried to help and were wonderful. Had to withdraw out of both divisions after that (was a finalist in singles 3.5).

Never had cramps like this before. Anyone?
Electrolyte loss? My muscles were not sore or anything.

Are you heavily hydrating the day before? Day of match and changeovers is often too late for hot humid singles tournaments. I am a 7 or 8 on the 10 point sweat meter 8-B … which actually I think is good for cooling during a match IF YOU DON’T RUN OUT of coolant.

I always brought a big jug of ice water … and a smaller container of Gatorade. I did not like to drink a lot of Gatorade, but as needed … like at start of 3rd set.

For me … it also mattered what I ate for dinner the night before. Spaghetti and meatballs was good next morning singles prep … but best for me on big matches was steak and baked potato. I can’t remember ever running out of energy with steak and baked potato the night before.
 

antony

Professional
Are you heavily hydrating the day before? Day of match and changeovers is often too late for hot humid singles tournaments. I am a 7 or 8 on the 10 point sweat meter 8-B … which actually I think is good for cooling during a match IF YOU DON’T RUN OUT of coolant.

I always brought a big jug of ice water … and a smaller container of Gatorade. I did not like to drink a lot of Gatorade, but as needed … like at start of 3rd set.

For me … it also mattered what I ate for dinner the night before. Spaghetti and meatballs was good next morning singles prep … but best for me on big matches was steak and baked potato. I can’t remember ever running out of energy with steak and baked potato the night before.
I actually stayed up late for karaoke with my family and our visiting family friends the night before haha.

Yeah I remembered I stayed cool and felt great all day, until I ran out of coolant!!! I will do what you do next time! I’ve been eating all day and resting yesterday and today. Have one match tonight, hopefully my body had enough time to recuperate.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
I actually stayed up late for karaoke with my family and our visiting family friends the night before haha.

Yeah I remembered I stayed cool and felt great all day, until I ran out of coolant!!! I will do what you do next time! I’ve been eating all day and resting yesterday and today. Have one match tonight, hopefully my body had enough time to recuperate.
Drink all the water you can stand the day before. I never crave water ... except on on those hot day changeovers, but I made myself drink a lot of water the day before. 8-B I went through a lot of water in typical summer singles match. If I remember correctly, I took a 2 gallon jug to tournament singles matches ... sometimes ran out and filled up again. That wasn't all drinking ... ice water over the back of the neck on changeovers both cooled you off and shocked you back to life. :p
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Had never heard anyone speak of full-body cramps. It could be a sign of a food allergy, a lack of electrolytes, a neurological disorder or an inadequate blood flow. Blood pressure issues? Dehydration can be a major factor. Or and unusually high consumption of water or other liquids interfere with your electrolyte levels.

Best to seek medical analysis.

 

mikeler

Moderator
A guy I play every 2 weeks told me a story of a hot tournament he played 10 years ago where he got full body cramps at the end of his 2nd match. I had never heard of that. So naturally I made fun of him for a few years...until it happened to me.

I played 2 matches of singles in the Florida heat. For whatever reason, I was not diligent with my electrolyte intake in the first match and was already cramping in my calves before I even started the 2nd match. By the end of the 2nd match, I couldn't drive for an hour. Cramps all over.

I finally made it home after bombarding myself with electrolytes. Obviously too much intake because after an hour of misery laying in bed, I threw up. Not sure why but that ended the cramps. Awful experience.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
A guy I play every 2 weeks told me a story of a hot tournament he played 10 years ago where he got full body cramps at the end of his 2nd match. I had never heard of that. So naturally I made fun of him for a few years...until it happened to me.

I played 2 matches of singles in the Florida heat. For whatever reason, I was not diligent with my electrolyte intake in the first match and was already cramping in my calves before I even started the 2nd match. By the end of the 2nd match, I couldn't drive for an hour. Cramps all over.

I finally made it home after bombarding myself with electrolytes. Obviously too much intake because after an hour of misery laying in bed, I threw up. Not sure why but that ended the cramps. Awful experience.
We need a definition for "full body". I had both calves locked up and quivering ... and at same time using left hand to keep right hand fingers from closing. When I let go of fingers to grab my calves, the fingers rolled closed which triggered the arm to roll up (lower arm folded at elbow and locked against upper arm. But my stomach, back and ears were not cramping ... did I have full body cramping. :p

I did throw up ... mom offered me a banana (not kidding ... mom thought I would eat a banana on the verge of heat stroke :love: ) and girlfriend drove me home. I got in a cold shower for a long time and lived to fight another day. Can be dangerous ... we had a couple go to hospital to get IV.
 

antony

Professional
Had never heard anyone speak of full-body cramps. It could be a sign of a food allergy, a lack of electrolytes, a neurological disorder or an inadequate blood flow. Blood pressure issues? Dehydration can be a major factor. Or and unusually high consumption of water or other liquids interfere with your electrolyte levels.

Best to seek medical analysis.

I’m pretty positive it was lack of electrolytes. I was drenched in sweat but i had to pee when I got to my mom’s. I think I just sweat all my salt out. I had a craving for sodium afterwards. Damn near every muscle cramped.
 

happyandbob

Hall of Fame
I’m pretty positive it was lack of electrolytes. I was drenched in sweat but i had to pee when I got to my mom’s. I think I just sweat all my salt out. I had a craving for sodium afterwards. Damn near every muscle cramped.
Add a 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of low sodium salt into your water. Low sodium salt uses potassium in place of some of the sodium and works really well to replenish electrolytes. Had full body cramps at sectionals one year when it was full sun, 100F, and 80% humidity. Have never had them again after I started adding low sodium salt and glucose into my water for matches.
 

Turbo-87

Legend
I think OP is rather lucky that the symptoms didn't get worse than full-body cramps. You were severely dehydrated and probably getting close to the point where you should have been hospitalized on IV fluids to replenish electrolytes. Ask me how I know. :) Any time you are getting cramps from dehydration, you will get short periods where you feel completely ok and think, yep, I can make it. No, you won't. It's too late. In most cases, you have lost too much sodium in your sweat and you are so far off in your electrolyte balance that it can only be replenished through IV or oral electrolytes over time. There is a misconception with deyhdration. You can continue to sweat and pee and still be considered dehydrated due to electrolytes being out of whack. When you stop sweating for no reason, you are in real trouble. A sweat test is a good thing to do since some people are known to lose more salt in sweat than others. We are not all made the same. There is a condition called cystic fibrosis where, among other things, patients lose a ton of salt in sweat because the body can't effectively use it, therefore sweating it out at rapid rate. Just using that as an example ... you'd already know if you had cf.

I have used a couple of products to help me out. Salt Sticks tablets or Thermotabs, both on Amazon, are a real help. I always keep pickle juice shots on hand as well. Just don't overdo the sodium intake and take as directed. More is not always better.
 
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Hoya

New User
I’ve also experienced these cascading cramps after playing extended periods in a high temp/high humidity environment. I can relate to the extraordinary pain.

Check out nuun sports tablets for electrolyte replenishment. Since taking these the cramps have been greatly reduced. It’s not perfect, ie in the past cascading cramps for 60 min through my body may now be for 10-15 mins in just my shoulders/upper back. Surely it’s still my lack of proper nutrition/hydration causing it but it’s at least an improvement.
 

antony

Professional
Yeah thinking about my dietary intake there's no way I get enough grams of sodium per day. I just stopped by for a basket of McDonald's fries and the whole basket only has like 530mg of sodium
 

happyandbob

Hall of Fame
Unless you're purposely avoiding salt, I'm sure you're getting plenty. That basket of fries would account for 20-25% of your recommended salt intake for a whole day. Most Americans eat 50-100% more salt than the recommendation.
 

Turbo-87

Legend
Yeah thinking about my dietary intake there's no way I get enough grams of sodium per day. I just stopped by for a basket of McDonald's fries and the whole basket only has like 530mg of sodium
I wouldn't worry about that. As happyandbob said, we all get more than enough sodium. Your problem was you lost a ton of it in a short period and threw your body off kilter. Don't load up on sodium on the daily to try and remedy the situation. By using supplements during times of hot exercise stress, you are trying to replace what you lost in the moment.
 

mikeler

Moderator
We need a definition for "full body". I had both calves locked up and quivering ... and at same time using left hand to keep right hand fingers from closing. When I let go of fingers to grab my calves, the fingers rolled closed which triggered the arm to roll up (lower arm folded at elbow and locked against upper arm. But my stomach, back and ears were not cramping ... did I have full body cramping. :p

I did throw up ... mom offered me a banana (not kidding ... mom thought I would eat a banana on the verge of heat stroke :love: ) and girlfriend drove me home. I got in a cold shower for a long time and lived to fight another day. Can be dangerous ... we had a couple go to hospital to get IV.
Sure, you feel a cramp in your stomach muscle, so you switch positions. Then something in your leg locks.up. After grabbing your leg in pain with your arm, now that arms get a cramp. My friend actually got cramps in his nether regions, thank goodness that didn't happen to me. It's whack-a-mole of cramps, every time you get one to calm down another one pops up.
 

antony

Professional
Sure, you feel a cramp in your stomach muscle, so you switch positions. Then something in your leg locks.up. After grabbing your leg in pain with your arm, now that arms get a cramp. My friend actually got cramps in his nether regions, thank goodness that didn't happen to me. It's whack-a-mole of cramps, every time you get one to calm down another one pops up.
Yep, my groin area was cramping too. Awful
 

FiddlerDog

Professional
Eat more salt.

What were you eating and drinking during the first 2 matches ?
Was it particularly hot outside ? Lots of sweat ?
 

antony

Professional
Eat more salt.

What were you eating and drinking during the first 2 matches ?
Was it particularly hot outside ? Lots of sweat ?
I drank a lot of coco water and water and had a few pieces of water melon. I was sweating a lot because it was hot and humid.
 

ChaelAZ

G.O.A.T.
Just dealt with this for our playoffs in Tucson, which you might already have seen mentioned in the other thread.

But one of our players ended up with full body cramps on his last match of the last day. He had finished the match, but it was a struggle for him He was sitting and watching the last singles and went over to lay down on the trainers table with a few leg cramps, then the whole body seized. He had been drinking water, had done mustard packs which are supposed to help, and they gave him electrolytes and salts, but still ended up taking him to ER and getting him bagged. He ended up there over night and had 4.5 bags of fluids. Pretty serious dydration, even with thinking he was drinking enough water. I had said though, even just pre-match warm up I felt like the water was being sucked out of my body, so I was slamming water constantly. I lost 8 lbs in just 2 days of play, so you can image that is a lot of liquid.
 

antony

Professional
Just dealt with this for our playoffs in Tucson, which you might already have seen mentioned in the other thread.

But one of our players ended up with full body cramps on his last match of the last day. He had finished the match, but it was a struggle for him He was sitting and watching the last singles and went over to lay down on the trainers table with a few leg cramps, then the whole body seized. He had been drinking water, had done mustard packs which are supposed to help, and they gave him electrolytes and salts, but still ended up taking him to ER and getting him bagged. He ended up there over night and had 4.5 bags of fluids. Pretty serious dydration, even with thinking he was drinking enough water. I had said though, even just pre-match warm up I felt like the water was being sucked out of my body, so I was slamming water constantly. I lost 8 lbs in just 2 days of play, so you can image that is a lot of liquid.
it’s awful. I recommend drinking enough water and to supplement with those salt stick caps or some pedialyte sport too on high endurance days. I just played light doubles today for 1.5 hours and I feel like I lost a lot of electrolytes and water. If I played more I’d probably have taken a salt stick cap. I went home and ate instead.
 

happyandbob

Hall of Fame
I drank a lot of coco water and water and had a few pieces of water melon. I was sweating a lot because it was hot and humid.
that could be a contributing factor right there. It's true that coconut water and watermelon both have electrolyes in them, but it's also true that both are diuretics and make you pee more than you otherwise would.

You might not be gaining much if any net electrolytes from coco water and watermelon
 
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happyandbob

Hall of Fame
Just dealt with this for our playoffs in Tucson, which you might already have seen mentioned in the other thread.

But one of our players ended up with full body cramps on his last match of the last day. He had finished the match, but it was a struggle for him He was sitting and watching the last singles and went over to lay down on the trainers table with a few leg cramps, then the whole body seized. He had been drinking water, had done mustard packs which are supposed to help, and they gave him electrolytes and salts, but still ended up taking him to ER and getting him bagged. He ended up there over night and had 4.5 bags of fluids. Pretty serious dydration, even with thinking he was drinking enough water. I had said though, even just pre-match warm up I felt like the water was being sucked out of my body, so I was slamming water constantly. I lost 8 lbs in just 2 days of play, so you can image that is a lot of liquid.
one of the ironies is that if you're already low on electrolytes, pounding water can actually pull more electrolytes out of your body making your electrolyte imbalance worse. If you're low on electrolytes, the liquid you drink has to have more electrolytes than your body's salinity at that time.
 
Started making my own electrolyte supplement for training.

Some B vitamin, Potassium and Lime (all liquid form)
Vitamin C and Pink Himalayan Salt (all Powder form)

Blend with either Pure Pomogranate, Grapefruit or Cranberry and free as a concentrated batch in ice cube trays. When ready for training, pop a few cubes, add water and you are set. All without the excess sugar from Gatorade/Powerade and those other drinks.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I've had cramps in my abs (after strenuous abs workouts) and calves at different times. The fix for cramps in the calves is to flex the foot and hold the leg at an acute angle to the foot until it subsides.

I once saw a guy on the ground with cramps so he was in pretty bad shape. I gave him my bottle of Gatorade and he was better in about twenty minutes. If you have cramps on a regular basis, you need better hydration (both fluids and electrolytes). Unless there is some other cause.
 
I've had cramps in my abs (after strenuous abs workouts) and calves at different times. The fix for cramps in the calves is to flex the foot and hold the leg at an acute angle to the foot until it subsides.

I once saw a guy on the ground with cramps so he was in pretty bad shape. I gave him my bottle of Gatorade and he was better in about twenty minutes. If you have cramps on a regular basis, you need better hydration (both fluids and electrolytes). Unless there is some other cause.
Hydration for h20 and the electrolytes should start at least 12-24hrs in advance? That's something I've done to be sure it doesn't exit the body too fast. What are your thoughts on that?
 

Rosstour

Legend
I’m pretty positive it was lack of electrolytes. I was drenched in sweat but i had to pee when I got to my mom’s. I think I just sweat all my salt out. I had a craving for sodium afterwards. Damn near every muscle cramped.
Pedialyte, now
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Hydration for h20 and the electrolytes should start at least 12-24hrs in advance? That's something I've done to be sure it doesn't exit the body too fast. What are your thoughts on that?
I take 400 mg of Magnesium daily and increase salt intake if that isn't enough. I buy the big bottles of 365 brand tablets at Whole Foods. I will bring a 32-ounce bottle of Gatorade to the courts with me when it is warmer out.

Dehydration is serious stuff. I once had to go to the ER for dehydration. I couldn't get my heartrate down (it was running at 215 for 45 minutes). They gave me a drug to reset the heart rate which they'd never used before. I would have died without that drug.
 

justRick

Rookie
Magnesium and potassium deficiency. Eat more organic veggies. Don't drink the popular sugar drinks (i.e. Gatorade), that'll spike your blood sugars, unleash insulin, and make you fat.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Magnesium and potassium deficiency. Eat more organic veggies. Don't drink the popular sugar drinks (i.e. Gatorade), that'll spike your blood sugars, unleash insulin, and make you fat.
The Mg deficiency, leading to other deficiencies, is a result of platinum-based chemo drugs.

Platinum chemotherapy, particularly cisplatin, is commonly associated with electrolyte imbalances, including hypomagnesemia, hypokalemia, hypophosphatemia, hypocalcemia and hyponatremia. The corpus of literature on these dyselectrolytemias is large; the objective of this review is to synthesize the literature and summarize the mechanisms responsible for these particular electrolyte disturbances in the context of platinum-based treatment as well as to present the clinical manifestations and current management strategies for oncologists and primary care physicians, since the latter are increasingly called on to provide care for cancer patients with medical comorbidities. Correct diagnosis and effective treatment are essential to improved patient outcomes.


My oncologist gave me IV Mg during chemo. But it looks like the side-effects of electrolyte depletion last for several years after treatment.

I used to increase table salt intake when I had cramps. But the oncologist picked IV Mg. He didn't tell me why but I looked at the research after treatment and came up with a number of papers explaining the reason for the electrolyte imbalances.
 

antony

Professional
I bought salt stick capsules and keep the bottle in my bag in case I’m out playing longer than expected
 
Don't drink the popular sugar drinks (i.e. Gatorade), that'll spike your blood sugars, unleash insulin, and make you fat.
I wish everyone understood this..... absolutely dislike these drinks and never suggest it to any students I teach.

Nuun is a much better alternative. With some sparkling water it tastes like a soda alternative too.
 

FIRETennis

Professional
Full body cramps with dehydration can be dangerous maybe lethal if your heart cramps ....You should never get to that point.
You need to make your own sports drink.
The commercially available ones do not contain enough sodium.
Buy the powders (the triathlon ones are great like IsoStar) and add salt!

My general rules during a tournament:
Sweat ~1.25L/hr (42 fl oz.) -~1.50L/hr (50 fl oz.) @ 27C/35C (80-95F ~50-60% humidity) during match intensity
1200mg sodium/L of sweat = 1500mg/h tennis @27C = 2/3 of a tsp. salt note as salt doesn't contain 100% sodium so 5.8g of salt in a teaspoon = ~2300mg of sodium.
160mg potassium/L of sweat = 200mg/h tennis @27C = 1/2 medium banana

I drink ~1.5L of water during a 3h tournament plus 1.5L of my own sports drink plus 3 bananas.
My sports drink contains 5600mg of sodium, that's 2.5 teaspoons and tastes disgusting.
The idea of the carb ratio in a sports drink helps the body absorb the water faster than plain water.
You should also pre-hydrate the day before make sure you get a gallon in of water over the course of the day (Never drink a ton of water at a time without salt as it can cause hyponatremia).
You can also look into the HotShot cramp drink which arguably might or might not work, but can alternatively use a bit of pickle juice with habanero peppers as a cramp emergency happens.
 
I know dates have a very good nutritional factor for dehydration as well in such a small portion. I started making my own homemade energy bites out of them.

Mix dates, figs, coconut oil, walnuts, cashews, flax, chia seed and cocoa powder all in a good processor. While it's chunky press it into a glass storage container and put in fridge. Then slice of small bites and take to your match/training.

Dates have a ton of potassium and some B-6 and magnesium. Figs also have a good bit of B-6.

I prefer this over a supplement gel/sugary drink. Though this item does have a good bit of sugar, if eaten in small bites throughout a match along with a homemade electrolyte supplement, can be awesome to prevent cramps and know you are getting healthy electrolytes back into your system.

No added sugars, mystery ingredients, etc... homemade and doesn't take long at all.
 

FIRETennis

Professional
I know dates have a very good nutritional factor for dehydration as well in such a small portion. I started making my own homemade energy bites out of them.

Mix dates, figs, coconut oil, walnuts, cashews, flax, chia seed and cocoa powder all in a good processor. While it's chunky press it into a glass storage container and put in fridge. Then slice of small bites and take to your match/training.

Dates have a ton of potassium and some B-6 and magnesium. Figs also have a good bit of B-6.

I prefer this over a supplement gel/sugary drink. Though this item does have a good bit of sugar, if eaten in small bites throughout a match along with a homemade electrolyte supplement, can be awesome to prevent cramps and know you are getting healthy electrolytes back into your system.

No added sugars, mystery ingredients, etc... homemade and doesn't take long at all.
Great tip. I think Djoko eats those in change overs :)
The food/drink industry has made a great smoke and mirror show to mythicize the word "electrolytes".
Sodium, potassium, calcium, chloride, phosphate, and magnesium... the first being lost in massive amounts during sweat and the others in much smaller proportion.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I wish everyone understood this..... absolutely dislike these drinks and never suggest it to any students I teach.

Nuun is a much better alternative. With some sparkling water it tastes like a soda alternative too.
Gatorade is fine.

I used to use Nuun but I found that I needed calories on the court.

Gatorade is more convenient as you don't have to mix the Nuun and it could even save a life, or at least reduce pain, on the court.
 
Gatorade is fine.

I used to use Nuun but I found that I needed calories on the court.

Gatorade is more convenient as you don't have to mix the Nuun and it could even save a life, or at least reduce pain, on the court.
Why do you think Gatorade is fine?

The sugar content is insane....
 

FIRETennis

Professional
The bottled EU edition of Gatorade is not the best sports drink. 380mg of sodium per 500ml / 17 oz. bottle.
The carbs in sports drinks are not meant to replenish energy, they are meant to help absorb water faster. Something to do with molecule size (I skipped Chem)... ideal in 6-8% concentration.
I've been told the US based Gatorade Gatorlyte Electrolyte Powder is much better with 780 milligrams of sodium and 400 milligrams of potassium.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
One minor note: I often food fast for 12-24 hours before playing tennis. I sometimes food fast 48-72 hours for appointments though that fortunately isn't that often. Gatorade or lemonade is really helpful or else there's nothing in the tank. Most of what I drink has no calories.
 
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