Gamma Progression II ELS or Gamma X-Stringer XLT

#1
Hey All,

I’m brand new to stringing and am in the market for a “spend once” type of purchase. I’ve done some research and narrowed it down between the two in the title (open to other suggestions). Main question - Is the XLT worth justifying an extra $600?

Background: Novice stringer. Would be stringing for myself and some close tennis buddies.

Thank you!
 
#2
One of my machines is an X-Els that I use for travel and I have been quite happy with it. Since you are talking about only stringing for yourself and buddies, I wouldn't spend another $600. I assume you want a constant pull machine and 6 point mount judging from the two machines, so I won't suggest saving more with a crank machine. If you aren't a string breaker it takes a fair number of string jobs to pay off a machine. If you are open to a crank machine consider the X-ST or ST II as both would still give you the 6 point mount. I wouldn't consider a drop weight though.
 
#3
Not worth the extra $600. You are better off with the Progression ELS (I have had one for years and never had a problem) and adding a stand.
 
#4
ELS for the win! Waiting for @graycrait to chime in though he owns a NEOS.

If your question had been between a Baiardo vs Sensor, then I would look long and hard; but then your daily volume would have to be high to justify getting those.
 

graycrait

Hall of Fame
#5
ELS for the win! Waiting for @graycrait to chime in though he owns a NEOS.
OK. Look at the NEOS 1000, especially a used one because you would have to work at it to break one. Mine came used from Tennis machines. One day when I was stoked on coffee I strung 4 rackets in like 65 minutes, but I can usually do up one at a not hurried pace of 25 minutes including cutting out the string and taking a look at grommets. If you are going to string you will need to repair or replace grommets, so take a look at that end of the business as well. If someone asks me to do a squash or racketball racket or T2000 I just laugh. I have yet to damage a racket on the NEOS 1000 mounting system.
 
N

Nashvegas

Guest
#6
OK. Look at the NEOS 1000, especially a used one because you would have to work at it to break one. Mine came used from Tennis machines. One day when I was stoked on coffee I strung 4 rackets in like 65 minutes, but I can usually do up one at a not hurried pace of 25 minutes including cutting out the string and taking a look at grommets. If you are going to string you will need to repair or replace grommets, so take a look at that end of the business as well. If someone asks me to do a squash or racketball racket or T2000 I just laugh. I have yet to damage a racket on the NEOS 1000 mounting system.
Considering getting into stringing, and posts like this one are steering me toward the NEOS 1000 or something like it. I would mainly be stringing for myself and trying different set ups... might string for a few friends... and I know if it took 45 minutes or more per job I would not stick with it. I think 35 minutes will be the magic number. That or less and I’ll be able to commit.

Maybe other machines would fit the bill. I do like what I’ve read about the NEOS. Would love to find one used but I’m sure that will be a challenge.
 
#7
Great feedback. Thanks all.

Isn’t the NEOS 1000 the same price as the ELS and not electric? What’s the benefit of that one over the ELS at the same price point?

Thanks!
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
#8
Maybe other machines would fit the bill. I do like what I’ve read about the NEOS. Would love to find one used but I’m sure that will be a challenge.
I guess that depends on where you are. I looked on Facebook Marketplace today and there are 2 NEOS 1000s for $800 each. There is also a Star 5 for $1,500. All 3 of those machines look to be in good shape. Having used Prince glidebar machines (lockout and electronic / glidebar and swivel clamps) and a Star 5, if it were me looking for a machine I wouldn’t consider the NEOSs over a Star 5 at half the price.

As far as considering a NEOS or something like it forget it. There is nothing like a NEOS it’s in a class all by itself. If you want a lockout with glidebars get the NEOS and don’t even look at the others.
 
N

Nashvegas

Guest
#9
I guess that depends on where you are. I looked on Facebook Marketplace today and there are 2 NEOS 1000s for $800 each. There is also a Star 5 for $1,500. All 3 of those machines look to be in good shape. Having used Prince glidebar machines (lockout and electronic / glidebar and swivel clamps) and a Star 5, if it were me looking for a machine I wouldn’t consider the NEOSs over a Star 5 at half the price.

As far as considering a NEOS or something like it forget it. There is nothing like a NEOS it’s in a class all by itself. If you want a lockout with glidebars get the NEOS and don’t even look at the others.
Appreciate the comments.
 
#10
6 months ago I had never strung a racket and bought a progression ELS. I'm loving it. The learning curve wasn't too bad with all the videos on youtube and this site. I did pick up a good alpha starting clamp and a stand since my purchase which are both useful in my opinion. I string for my self and family only. Love being able to string my own rackets any time I please. And when it's warmer and I'm playing a lot it's pretty frequent.
 
#11
Great feedback. Thanks all.

Isn’t the NEOS 1000 the same price as the ELS and not electric? What’s the benefit of that one over the ELS at the same price point?

Thanks!
I have the same question — wouldn’t electric constant pull outweigh whatever advantages the Neos 1000 lockout has? What am I missing?
 
#12
The only thing your getting from the NEOS is speed as you can tension the string much faster. Other than that, ELS is the way to go considering the price and the amount of benefits it has over the NEOS.
 
#14
The only thing your getting from the NEOS is speed as you can tension the string much faster. Other than that, ELS is the way to go considering the price and the amount of benefits it has over the NEOS.
Thanks, just what I needed to know.

Only real downfall of the ELS is the baseclamps. Can't figure out why they don't just put switch action clamps
on all of their fixed clamp machines.
OK -- and the switch action clamps are expensive it looks like, $340 and not readily available either. What is superior about the switch actions?
 
#15
Thanks, just what I needed to know.


OK -- and the switch action clamps are expensive it looks like, $340 and not readily available either. What is superior about the switch actions?
Well, if you're coming from flying clamps, the "quick action" base clamps on the ELS will be a huge upgrade. After that, the "switch
action" (i think that's the term) clamps are just easier, smoother, nicer to use as it's just one throw of the lever (if adjusted nicely) vs cranking down a lever
(essentially turning a coarse nut) to snug the base clamp.

Having said that, I have a Gamma 6004 and the baseclamps on a neos 1500 are nicer to use in my opinion. Just more solid feeling in
their throw/lock. The Gammas are fine though....
 
#16
A very detailed video on youtube, with a review of this new machine. Quite interesting (it turned out, my German is not quite as rusty as I thought - I could understand pretty much everything :)). I kept on wondering, is it noisy or is it just location of the camera/microphone that makes it sound so loud?

Seems to be a nice machine, overall. Appears to be longer and heavier than X-ELS.

 
#17
Great info from everyone. @Herb Did a great job taking time to answer some questions on the side for me. I ended up pulling the trigger on a Gamma Progression II ELS, based on his recommendations.
 
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