Gamma Progression II ELS VS Alpha Revo 4000 Stringing Machine

Which stringer do you think would be better


  • Total voters
    8

Calebdominc

New User
Tell me your thoughts on this.

Gamma Progression II ELS or Alpha Revo 4000 with Wise 2086 Electronic Pro. Head Tensioner.

I will probably be stringing for just myself a lot and maybe a some other people.

And tell me if you think there's a better stringer than these two that's under 1,400 dollars.
 

shadow01

Professional
I was in the same boat as you - went with the gamma x-stringer / wise. I hear good things on alpha as well. Alpha & wise is my vote. Plus, you will have back up lockout if electronic needs service.
 

Calebdominc

New User
I was in the same boat as you - went with the gamma x-stringer / wise. I hear good things on alpha as well. Alpha & wise is my vote. Plus, you will have back up lockout if electronic needs service.
That's what I was thinking because it would be amazing to have a backup. I just don't know which ones built stronger because I want one that's going to last me a while.
 

shadow01

Professional
That's what I was thinking because it would be amazing to have a backup. I just don't know which ones built stronger because I want one that's going to last me a while.
If your target is sub $1400 - I think this will last you a while. Wise has strong reputation, user base, customer service. Same with Alpha. Other options come into play of course if you have a bigger budget. Just my opinions though and I’ve only been self stringing for a little over a year. Others here have more experience and will chime in I’m sure!

But my thoughts after a bunch of reading and posting here - if not stringing high volume professionally and if mainly stringing as a hobby for self or friends and family than this setup is more than enough. Might not even need the wise tbh. You can/ should just use the alpha and then buy the wise if you still think you need it.
 

Calebdominc

New User
If your target is sub $1400 - I think this will last you a while. Wise has strong reputation, user base, customer service. Same with Alpha. Other options come into play of course if you have a bigger budget. Just my opinions though and I’ve only been self stringing for a little over a year. Others here have more experience and will chime in I’m sure!

But my thoughts after a bunch of reading and posting here - if not stringing high volume professionally and if mainly stringing as a hobby for self or friends and family than this setup is more than enough. Might not even need the wise tbh. You can/ should just use the alpha and then buy the wise if you still think you need it.
The one reason why I want to spend a bit more for that is I want to give my friends a consistent string job. But for night right now I am definitely leaning towards the alpha. Thanks for the help as well.
 
Last edited:

Wes

Hall of Fame
Tell me your thoughts on this.

Gamma Progression II ELS or Alpha Revo 4000 with Wise 2086 Electronic Pro. Head Tensioner.

I will probably be stringing for just myself a lot and maybe a some other people.

And tell me if you think there's a better stringer than these two that's under 1,400 dollars.


@Calebdominc,

If I have to choose between only the 2 you've listed... the Revo 4000 w/ Wise.


However, since you're going to add a Wise anyway, I think there are other options you may want to think about.
$1364 ($739 + $625) is a lot to spend - just to have a crank back-up tensioner on hand (if/when needed) for a tabletop machine.

The same thing can be accomplished, for about $210 less, by adding the Wise to an Alpha Pioneer DC+ ($529 + $625)
Same turntable, same mounting, same string clamps, same base clamps (and you'd still have a back-up tensioner - it would just be the drop weight, rather than the crank).
After all, the stock tensioner is going to merely be back-up anyway, so why spend an extra $200+ to have a crank tensioner sitting in a box, rather than a drop-weight tensioner sitting in a box?

Along these same lines, you could add the Wise 2086 to a Gamma Prog. 602FC or Gamma X-6FC ($580 or $600)

Any of the above combinations would yield you a perfectly decent fixed clamp, electronic constant-pull machine (with a diabolo and an adjustable linear gripper) - for between $1154 and $1225.

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If you really want to add the Wise to a tabletop crank machine (like the Revo 4000), you might also consider the following choices as well...
- Gamma Progression ST II ($870 tabletop crank)
- Gamma X-ST ($900 tabletop crank, same machine as the Prog. ST II but has 2 storage drawers within the blue metal base)
- Tourna 300-CS ($945 upright crank)

All 3 of the above have very similar/comparable features (aside from the 300-CS upright coming with a stand).

One thing to mention about the Revo 4000, Gamma Prog. ST II and the Gamma X-ST...
If you put these machines on any table of normal/typical height, the mounted racquet will then be at a height much higher than you'd likely want it (unless you are very tall).
This peculiarity is due to the height differential (between where the bottom of the base is, and where the mounted racquet is).
So, the only real remedy for this situation is to (a) find a table that is a very unusual height (like roughly the height of your knees) or (b) buy a dedicated stand (Gamma makes one for their machines, it's $140).
Otherwise, you may be working at a height other than you'd prefer.
Note: In case you aren't already aware - most stringers like to have the mounted racquet to be around the height of their elbows.

-------------------------------------------------

Regarding 360 degree rotation (after adding a Wise)...
You will have 360 degree rotation after adding a Wise onto a Revo 4000, Gamma Prog. ST II or Gamma X-ST.
However, I don't think you'll have 360 degree rotation with a Wise added to a Pioneer DC+, Prog. 602FC or X-6FC.

Just trying to give you as many "little" insights as possible.

-------------------------------------------------

You may want to read more of my thoughts, in similar conversations...

Posts #5 and #11

Posts #2, #4 and #11

and...

and...

and...

and...

and here is @Andl's epic Gamma X-ELS/Prog. II ELS write-up/review...

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Lastly...
The "best bang for your buck" (as far as tabletop eCP machines go) may very well be the Pro's Pro Tomcat.
It has many features found on various high end machines.
- linear gripper w/ diabolo (very similar to a Wise)
- variable speeds, lb./kg. & pre-stretch options (very similar to a Wise), knot function, brake function
- solid turntable with self-centering feature
- diamond dusted swivel clamps
- nice button release/gravity release base clamps
- "C" shaped side mounts
- side mounts adjust in/out simultaneously by turning one knob

Not bad for just $1160 (plus shipping).

BTW, a separate Tomcat stand is also available, if desired (for about $120)

Now... the only reason that I'm not jumping up & down, screaming "get a Tomcat!", is because I haven't actually seen/handled one in the flesh yet (and, therefore, I can't attest to exactly how good the QC is on it).
It certainly appears to be very good.

These videos should give you a fairly good idea of the Tomcat's build and features...

Overview...

and...

In use (pay no attention to the incorrect use of the diabolo)
 

shadow01

Professional
So, the only real remedy for this situation is to (a) find a table that is a very unusual height (like roughly the height of your knees) or (b) buy a dedicated stand (Gamma makes one for their machines, it's $140).

Great post Wes.

one thing on the height of table top machines. Adjustable height desks are very popular these days especially since many people are working from home and there are benefits to standing desks. Not sure if they will go low enough for the elbow position you mentioned for everyone though. Some may want to consider that as an alternative to getting an OEM stand. The Swedish furniture store has some for around 250.
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
The one reason why I want to spend a bit more for that is I want to give my friends a consistent string job. But for night right now I am definitely leaning towards the alpha. Thanks for the help as well.

I started out on a table top drop-weight machine with only two-point mounting and floating clamps. It was a LaserFibre machine, which was a US version of Stringway and I rather appreciated that it had constant pull. But after switching to a machine with six-point mounting and fixed clamps, it's easy to recognize how much these features contribute to producing more consistent string jobs.

Full disclosure: My newer machine is a Gamma Prog. II ELS. So I also have constant pull with this machine and the electric tensioner is definitely less tedious for me when I get busy with stringing in the warmer months. If I only had to string one or two racquets every now and then, the only things I'd probably really want in a machine are fixed clamps, six-point mounting, and a well calibrated tensioner. Constant pull isn't even at the top of my personal list, but it's pretty nice - I suppose I'd miss it if I had a machine without it.

I was initially nervous about the idea of an electric machine, but I got to use a Gamma 5800 ELS for a couple months after my old machine broke down. That trial run showed me the upside of that sort of rig and I also wanted a table top setup that I could keep on a spare desk instead of occupying its own piece of floor space. I've had my Prog. II ELS for at least seven years and I can say that it's been completely trouble free after who-knows-how-many hundred string jobs.

Gamma's customer service has a fantastic reputation. That gave me extra confidence with buying my machine... but I haven't needed to call them once.

So I can recommend my machine for sure, but I think that if you're getting any solid rig that includes six-point mounting and fixed clamps, you'll be in pretty good shape. Those Alpha machines look pretty nice. I also think that no matter what you get, you won't be taking a huge risk if it turns out that the specific machine you buy turns out to be not right for you. There's always somebody out there shopping for a machine, so you can always get a lot of your money back if you decide to flip it for something else.
 
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