Give us a blazing fast indoor hardcourt!

Kralingen

Hall of Fame
It would initially be an awful product and players would complain a lot.

But if it was made a permanent fixture on the tour it could be something interesting.
 

LOBALOT

Hall of Fame
There are a lot of old indoor clubs here in the "middle of the west" that have not resurfaced their indoor courts since they were built in the 50s. The courts are lightening fast...

I play once a week during the winter on one with a group of friends and it takes us at least a month to get used to them. Shots stay low and just fly past people while they are still taking their racquet back to hit a forehand. It is really funny to watch all the late shots going way wide.
 

Rosstour

Legend
There are a lot of old indoor clubs here in the "middle of the west" that have not resurfaced their indoor courts since they were built in the 50s. The courts are lightening fast...

I play once a week during the winter on one with a group of friends and it takes us at least a month to get used to them. Shots stay low and just fly past people while they are still taking their racquet back to hit a forehand. It is really funny to watch all the late shots going way wide.
This sounds awesome.
 

LOBALOT

Hall of Fame
This sounds awesome.
That club I am speaking of has a junior academy and they always seem to produce advanced 10-14 year old kids before the other kids eventually catch up and I believe not only is it the coaches but also the kids have to get ready so dang early for the ball.

Can you imagine what it is like for those kids to head outside in the Spring to play some tournament on some municipal courts?

It must feel like they are waiting forever for the ball to get them.
 

initialize

Rookie
That club I am speaking of has a junior academy and they always seem to produce advanced 10-14 year old kids before the other kids eventually catch up and I believe not only is it the coaches but also the kids have to get ready so dang early for the ball.

Can you imagine what it is like for those kids to head outside in the Spring to play some tournament on some municipal courts?

It must feel like they are waiting forever for the ball to get them.
what's the name of the club?
 

Third Serve

G.O.A.T.
Should have just left conditions the way they were in the 90s. That way you get a steady mix of surfaces. Slow, fast, medium And you don’t have the same 2-3 guys dominate for 10-15 years straight. While everyone else may as well not even show up
90's grass courts 100% needed to be slowed down because the upgrading racket technology was making the game more conducive to servebotting. The 90's game with its graphite rackets was already more serve-dominant than the 80's as matches like the 1994 Wimbledon final demonstrate, and that shift was only going to continue with the advent of even more groundbreaking technology in the late-90's/early-00's. I think it was absolutely a good idea to halt that change by slowing the grass down. Ideally, the 2001/2003-2004 Wimbledon courts are what grass should look like in this era. Quick-paced and low-bouncing, but not nearly as fast as the pre-2001 courts. Starting from 2005, imo, the courts became a bit slower and higher-bouncing, and that's when they started to go too far the other direction imo.

I don't think genuinely fast surfaces would be completely feasible these days (but maybe it could work). But I would certainly like to see more medium-fast courts.
 

Villain

Professional
yeah but he hasn’t won a single match on a fast court. Probably hasn’t lost one either but still
Sure, courts aren’t as fast as they once were but we still have a variance of speeds. The fastest courts just don’t play as fast as the fastest courts used to and the speed window is smaller. But if Novak tends to play far better than his opponents on today’s fastest courts, why wouldn’t he win on even faster courts against the same opponents? Your logic doesn’t follow.
 
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ibbi

Legend
With the stuff they play with today it'd be absolutely awful. The evolution of racquets and strings is likely as much reason as any other that things have gone the way they have. Counterbalance. Not to say there wouldn't be a degree of upside from having a tournament or two that way. Variety is always good, though lower bounce is more important simply than speed to make a real difference.
 
Anyone here ever play on a hardcourt in the rain? The balls just skip off the water. It doesn't slow them down at all. Not to mention they end up heavy as hell when they get wet. I grew up playing in a place where it rained almost every day in the summer so if we wanted to play, we'd have to deal with wet courts.
 

skip1969

G.O.A.T.
90's grass courts 100% needed to be slowed down because the upgrading racket technology was making the game more conducive to servebotting. The 90's game with its graphite rackets was already more serve-dominant than the 80's as matches like the 1994 Wimbledon final demonstrate, and that shift was only going to continue with the advent of even more groundbreaking technology in the late-90's/early-00's. I think it was absolutely a good idea to halt that change by slowing the grass down. Ideally, the 2001/2003-2004 Wimbledon courts are what grass should look like in this era. Quick-paced and low-bouncing, but not nearly as fast as the pre-2001 courts. Starting from 2005, imo, the courts became a bit slower and higher-bouncing, and that's when they started to go too far the other direction imo.

I don't think genuinely fast surfaces would be completely feasible these days (but maybe it could work). But I would certainly like to see more medium-fast courts.
I disagree. In my view, slowing down the courts was the biggest mistake this sport has made. Those fast, low bouncing courts gave the advantage to servers, sure. But those same servers were at a disadvantage for months of the clay court season. To give them an edge for the short grass court season was hardly a tragedy. Plus, if you look at those Wimbledons from the '90s-00's, plenty of baseliners still got through to the second week. For them, the onus was on shorter strokes, shorter points, and playing an all court game, which was an awesome break after weeks and weeks of baselining on clay.

We went from a calendar that had variety back then - the short winter AO/hard court swing (neutral surface) to the clay court/RG swing (advantage baseliners) to the short grass/Wimbledon swing (advantage serve and volleyers) to the fall hard court/USO swing (neutral surface). What we have now is a joke compared to that.

We're the only major sport going against the trend for more offense and quicker outcomes. Most every other professional sport has made rules changes in order to speed up play and raise scoring, or at least give the advantage to offense. Hockey, basketball, baseball, soccer, American football, even volleyball. In tennis, we've killed offense and turned pro tennis into a slogfest grind-a-thon.
 

Ultra 2

Professional
At one time we had 3 grass slams and 1 clay. Now they slowed down all the surfaces to replicate the one oddball surface.. the French Open. Only a clay specialist can find success on it with some very limited outliers. Mind boggling.
 
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