Golfer's Elbow

TennisCanada1

Professional
Sorry Chastennis, I just saw that you replied to the thread. I can't identify a specific part of the service motion that gives me pain. My serving technique is great actually. Before, I used way too much arm, which was one of my initial theories of how I got my injury, but I went for a few lessons with a great coach who cleaned it up quite nicely. I also never had any elbow injuries before this.

From the advice of the second surgeon, I took a 6 week break, and I just resumed to practice on Wednesday. I played lightly Wednesday, and I was full speed by Friday. I was perfectly fine with no elbow issues at all. Then, I took serves and my elbow felt terrible a few hours after practice.

This supports my theory, being that the first surgeon is right, because I predicted that it IS the pronator/lacertus fibrosis syndrome, which involves too much muscle mass in the elbow so there is pain because there is a lack of blood supply/oxygen because the fascia won't stretch to compensate, so I knew that after the 6 week break that I would most likely feel the pain again. I just took the break to satisfy the surgeon and to rule out anything else.

RogueFLIP, thank you for taking the time to read the thread. I actually did exactly what you suggested, as it is a great idea, but unfortunately it didn't work. I went for several sessions.


My follow up is on March 2nd, but at this point, I'm so frustrated on court that it's getting to me. It's bringing me stress, and I don't think it's worth it to go for surgery and risk nerve damage and go through the whole surgery process just so I can serve again. It's really sad for me, because I've played at top competitive level in Canada for 15 years now, but at this point I'm contemplating quitting. Given that I have FAI in my hip, and now this, I don't know what I could do for exercise as I need to stay away from lunges and squats, yoga, bicycle, kickboxing (because of the kicks) and more, so ANY advice is appreciated because I still want to find something new to put my effort into and keep in shape.

Thanks all.
 
Did you ever do a time line starting with the beginning of your injury? Basically, what is the longest period that you have not stressed the injured tissue?

I believe that tendons and fascia can take long times to heal. 6 weeks is too short a time for those tissues. Would 6 months do better? A year?

If you have been taking multi-breaks, each time stressing the injury afterward - what has been the longest break?

For pronator/lacertus fibrosis syndrome what is the tissue that is injured? What does your research indicate that the healing time might be for a new injury for that tissue? Have you done weight lifting to develop those forearm muscles?
 
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TennisCanada1

Professional
From my understanding, it isn't a tendon or muscle that is the issue. It's not like there's something that needs to heal. It's the fact that I've supposedly developed enough muscle mass in my elbow that the fascia won't stretch to compensate, which is why I feel pain- because there is a lack of blood flow to the area. It's like compartment syndrome to a certain extent. My forearms are strong and I've never had any tendon issues, and my MRI came back clean as well. If I stopped playing for 6 months or a year, when I started playing again I would likely just develop that muscle mass again as being inevitable by playing a lot so then I would feel the pain again.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
From my understanding, it isn't a tendon or muscle that is the issue. It's not like there's something that needs to heal. It's the fact that I've supposedly developed enough muscle mass in my elbow that the fascia won't stretch to compensate, which is why I feel pain- because there is a lack of blood flow to the area. It's like compartment syndrome to a certain extent. My forearms are strong and I've never had any tendon issues, and my MRI came back clean as well. If I stopped playing for 6 months or a year, when I started playing again I would likely just develop that muscle mass again as being inevitable by playing a lot so then I would feel the pain again.
I am confused. Can you better explain what is causing the pain.

The confusion I think comes from saying there is nothing to heal, but then saying there is no blood flow in that area, which I take to imply the need for healing.

Anyhow as I understand it, heat=blood flow. My GE is getting better. I can play matches and can serve great without a brace with maybe the exception of the hard flat serve. I use a combo of exercises (basically wrist curls both ways, and rubberbands) and everynight I wrap my elbow lightly with a neoprene WRAP and not a sleeve. Sleeves are too tight but the wrap you can adjust to allow blood flow and still heat the area.

Here is what I use and well it has a gel pack and when things were worse I would heat the gel pack:

http://www.walgreens.com/store/c/walgreens-ice-&-heat-wrap-multi-purpose/ID=prod3874199-product
 
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RogueFLIP

Professional
Is your FAI hip the same side as your injured elbow?


Was your ART therapist just treating your symptomatic areas or were they also treating your shoulder as well? And essentially everything in between?

As I mentioned in my previous post about how your shoulder is connected to your symptoms bc you mostly experience your symptoms with serving, if your therapist is only concentrating on where you're feeling your symptoms, then they are missing the big picture.

And even if you're lucky enough to find a therapist who is treating the whole system, it doesn't sound like they are holding their techniques long enough in order to effectively release the tight tissues.

Healthy fascia has a very, very high tensile strength. Your body can withstand a lot of pressure on its parts during tennis, hell just walking. That is mainly due to the elasticity of the fascial system. I'm sure if you search hard enough you'll find references that show that the fascial system can tolerate hundreds of pounds of pressure.

Now you've got an even tighter region of fascia. You think your therapist is strong enough to make worthwhile changes in length by forcing that system? Maybe....for two hours or two days....

Something to think about...
 

jga111

Hall of Fame
From my understanding, it isn't a tendon or muscle that is the issue. It's not like there's something that needs to heal. It's the fact that I've supposedly developed enough muscle mass in my elbow that the fascia won't stretch to compensate, which is why I feel pain- because there is a lack of blood flow to the area. It's like compartment syndrome to a certain extent. My forearms are strong and I've never had any tendon issues, and my MRI came back clean as well. If I stopped playing for 6 months or a year, when I started playing again I would likely just develop that muscle mass again as being inevitable by playing a lot so then I would feel the pain again.
This sounds really harsh, and I can relate to you. Before I started playing tennis I remember doing pull-ups, and every time I was doing them I'd feel some pain in the golfers-elbow section, it would ease but it would always be there. Before my shoulder injury I had a moderate case of golfers elbow, but I think that was a case of a tense arm (my forehand) and playing too much.

I STILL BELIEVE THERE IS HOPE! Say it is a muscle mass - there is no reason why that muscle mass cannot be manipulated. I took up Ashtanga 2 years ago and my body has changed, my muscles are stronger and elongated. Maybe there are stretches, yoga forms, etc that will help mould your muscle mass to a state where you will be able to play pain-free. Don't rule it out, I would suggest you look into this aspect more and give it a chance.
 

TennisCanada1

Professional
Thanks guys for your input.

Shroud, what's causing the pain is the fact that the fascia will not stretch to compensate for the size of my muscle mass. I was told it's a combination of my underlying anatomy with the fact that I play tennis. It's as if I was not meant to serve from a biological standpoint. My MRIs come back perfectly clean. There are no tears or injured tendons. It's not TE or Ge, it's in a special spot right under the elbow on the inside (I posted a picture in the thread on the last page I believe). Also if it was a tendon injury, I would have pain while hitting a forehand or backhand. I can play 3 hours if I wanted to of straight groundstrokes and not feel a thing, not even 1% pain, but the second I take 5 serves, it hurts, because I have developed muscle mass in a place that hurts when I involve pronation of the elbow while serving.

RogueFlip, thank you again for all your input. I went to a really credible guy that tremendously improved the state of my hip FAI in just one session. He didn't attempt anything on the shoulder because he felt he didn't need to. I completely get what you're saying but the surgeons and the therapist thing it's just a matter of releasing the fascia. He said he can feel how tight it is, how it feels like a cooked steak, and he tried myofascial techniques but it didn't help.

jga111, I definitely agree with you, and I actually used to do ashtanga and mysore for 1.5 years but I had to quit last year because of my hip FAI :(

mikeler- thank you again but I've seriously run out of options. I don't want to do surgery, even if it is just a 15 minute surgery, because as much as I love competing, I'm sure in the next few years I'll enter the workforce and competing will be secondary in my life.. I just always thought I could continue my passion but I guess not. If any of you have ideas though of alternative sports or activities it would be much appreciated. Thanks again.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
I STILL BELIEVE THERE IS HOPE! Say it is a muscle mass - there is no reason why that muscle mass cannot be manipulated. I took up Ashtanga 2 years ago and my body has changed, my muscles are stronger and elongated. Maybe there are stretches, yoga forms, etc that will help mould your muscle mass to a state where you will be able to play pain-free. Don't rule it out, I would suggest you look into this aspect more and give it a chance.
Yeah. I find that the stretching and recently using a foam roller on the forearm, elbow area really helped. I can see where something like yoga would really help long term.
 

TennisCanada1

Professional
I'm a natural lefty, and I have been playing lefty for the last 6 weeks and have gotten quite good. I'd say I'm a 3.5-4.0 level as a lefty. I have a wicked forehand and so-so backhand, but literally no serve. It would just take too long to switch over and It's an unsettling feeling to be inferior to everyone else when I could beat them as a right handed player.
 

TennisCanada1

Professional
Between my hip and elbow, I just don't know what I could do. I'm 21 years old, not 60..I shouldn't be this limited but I am, but I still want to be active.
 
Research as much as you can and realize with injuries that there's a lot of uncertainty. Don't assume any diagnosis is correct, just research things and see if they seem to make sense.

Research the surgery. Success rate?

Identify the muscles closest to the pain as best you can. What function do they have? It's your understanding that certain muscles need blood so they then become painful. Correct? Why do they only hurt for the serve and not ground strokes if fascia is constricting blood vessels? Why don't you have ischemia (pain from lack of blood flow) when you just exercise the forearm using the likely muscles?

The serve develops racket head speed from internal shoulder rotation from muscles in the chest and back. Your forearm pronation muscles may play a part, stiffen or lock, but that probably would not require a lot of blood. ?

Why does the fascia only affect the serve? Is there a video of you serving?
 
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What do you suggest it could be then Chas Tennis?
It takes a Dr to diagnose injuries. Often a specialist is necessary.

There may be considerations of your health care system in Canada. When you have a less common injury how difficult is it for you to see a specialist?

I found this presentation. It seems to often show very serious injuries often associated with serious accidents. Relax, your injury seems very limited compared to the examples shown. Discuss the blood flow ischemia issues with your Dr if you have not already. Ask how to avoid aggravating the condition? Reduce activities to avoid blood flow? Ask your Dr about his/her experiences treating this kind of condition.
http://www.slideshare.net/kisnakmc04/compartment-syndrome-32878551

Here is a site that has threads mostly on baseball and arm injuries. The Dr who runs it sometimes recommends sports medicine doctors in various areas at least of the US.
http://asmiforum.proboards.com/

This site has information. Generally, these are better selected research publications.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/?term=Lacertus+Fibrosus+syndrome

Listen to your Dr. Don't stress your arm. Study what your injury is and what it is not. If you feel you need a specialist for your injury start asking and looking.
--------------------------------------------
Just found this publication, it looks potentially serious. I'd try to find an experienced specialist if the diagnosis of pronator/lacertus fibrosis syndrome is correct.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3193633/
 
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RogueFLIP

Professional
Shroud, what's causing the pain is the fact that the fascia will not stretch to compensate for the size of my muscle mass. I was told it's a combination of my underlying anatomy with the fact that I play tennis. It's as if I was not meant to serve from a biological standpoint. My MRIs come back perfectly clean. There are no tears or injured tendons. It's not TE or Ge, it's in a special spot right under the elbow on the inside (I posted a picture in the thread on the last page I believe). Also if it was a tendon injury, I would have pain while hitting a forehand or backhand. I can play 3 hours if I wanted to of straight groundstrokes and not feel a thing, not even 1% pain, but the second I take 5 serves, it hurts, because I have developed muscle mass in a place that hurts when I involve pronation of the elbow while serving.
I'm curious if you get pain when you do isolated pronation of your forearm with a straight and/or bent elbow.

Also if your FAI hip is the same side as your right? symptomatic arm.

RogueFlip, thank you again for all your input. I went to a really credible guy that tremendously improved the state of my hip FAI in just one session. He didn't attempt anything on the shoulder because he felt he didn't need to. I completely get what you're saying but the surgeons and the therapist thing it's just a matter of releasing the fascia. He said he can feel how tight it is, how it feels like a cooked steak, and he tried myofascial techniques but it didn't help.
I'm not surprised that what your credible guy tried in terms of myofascial techniques didn't "work" for the reasons I mentioned in my previous post.

I'm curious if he felt like he didn't need to attempt any shoulder work bc he actually palpated your soft tissue or bc if he didn't think that it was related to your issue.

Anyways, there's still plenty of options out there for treatment.
I'm not saying this is a miracle cure, merely to bring your awareness to it, but this is the type of bodywork that I do on my patients.

http://www.myofascialrelease.com/

Of course there's probably a lot of information on the site that sounds familiar from what you might have read or heard from other therapists before, but believe me, the treatment is nothing like you've received from other myofascial therapists who have not been trained by John Barnes.

Perhaps there is a therapist near you. Of course this is not a complete list, just therapists who choose to pay to be on the directory.

http://mfrtherapists.com/listings/?state=Canada&country=CA

Good luck.
 
I am not following some details of TennisCanada1's injury, but if this describes a similar condition it sounds as if it could be serious. This reference may apply to different circumstances. This sounds like an area requiring a very well qualified specialist.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3193633/

Acute compartment syndrome of forearm and hand
T. Chandraprakasam and R. Ashok Kumar
Author information ► Copyright and License information ►
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Go to:
Abstract

The diagnosis and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome is of paramount importance. Unless the viscious cycle is intervened at an appropriately early time it will result in irreversible damage leading to disability. In this review article we are discussing the basic pathophysiological process through which the various aetiological factors causing increased compartmental pressure lead to the progressive death of muscles and nerves. We also discuss the various clinical features that aid in the diagnosis and the role of intracompartmental pressure measurements. Finally we hope to ascertain the basic principles and the surgical techniques for treating this condition effectively.

I still can't understand why this hurts only for some athletic motions. ?
 
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TennisCanada1

Professional
I'm curious if you get pain when you do isolated pronation of your forearm with a straight and/or bent elbow.

Also if your FAI hip is the same side as your right? symptomatic arm.



I'm not surprised that what your credible guy tried in terms of myofascial techniques didn't "work" for the reasons I mentioned in my previous post.

I'm curious if he felt like he didn't need to attempt any shoulder work bc he actually palpated your soft tissue or bc if he didn't think that it was related to your issue.

Anyways, there's still plenty of options out there for treatment.
I'm not saying this is a miracle cure, merely to bring your awareness to it, but this is the type of bodywork that I do on my patients.

http://www.myofascialrelease.com/

Of course there's probably a lot of information on the site that sounds familiar from what you might have read or heard from other therapists before, but believe me, the treatment is nothing like you've received from other myofascial therapists who have not been trained by John Barnes.

Perhaps there is a therapist near you. Of course this is not a complete list, just therapists who choose to pay to be on the directory.

http://mfrtherapists.com/listings/?state=Canada&country=CA

Good luck.
I found someone in Toronto that worked with John F. Barnes and she's an 'expert' on the directory you posted. I'm going to check it out, thanks.
 

smboogie

Rookie
Have had some light GE flare up lately so I got the Flexbar and have been doing forearm exercises for about a week with no playing. Feels better but planning to try hitting tonight to see how it is.
 

rufus_smith

Professional
FWIW I've had GE from tennis serving that was bad enough that I stopped (gasp) playing for three-four months. During that non-tennis time I "babied" the elbow and tried to do no movements that would irritate it. I did daily reverse Flexbar exercises but I'm not sure that it mattered. It gradually got better and better. The next big problem was to stop it from coming back when I went back to tennis. I went to a softer string, and a smaller grip, and a lighter head racquet configuration. Luckily, it worked out. I 've been hitting the serve now much harder than I used to and have no pain.
Maybe this will help. Good luck
 

TennisCanada1

Professional
Thank you RogueFlip and Chas Tennis once again, and everyone else.
I've got an MFR specialist assessment/treatment session in a few days. She is an expert and has worked with John F. Barnes. Hopefully I can get some help from this.
 

RogueFLIP

Professional
^^^If you're seeing Sara from the directory, I know her personally and you'll be in good hands. The other person I don't know.

Like I said it's not a miracle cure, it's going to take some time and work (and not just on your symptomatic sites :twisted:....can you say arm pull?...you'll understand once you get treated.....make sure you tell them it hurts when you serve!)

Just wanted to make you aware of this option.

Good luck.
 

smboogie

Rookie
Quick update the elbow feels much better after a few weeks of using the flexbar at least 3-5 days a week. Nothing too crazy usually while watching TV. Played tennis last week and felt good, planning to hit tonight as well.

I'm intentionally only playing once a week to allow some healing time.
 

speedysteve

Legend
Quick update the elbow feels much better after a few weeks of using the flexbar at least 3-5 days a week. Nothing too crazy usually while watching TV. Played tennis last week and felt good, planning to hit tonight as well.

I'm intentionally only playing once a week to allow some healing time.
Flexbar is great isn't it.
 

TennisCanada1

Professional
MFR didn't work.
Interestingly, I did bicep curls yesterday for the first time in at least a year. I used 15 pound weights and I did 3 sets of bicep curls of 12 reps. I woke up this morning and I am in agonizing pain only on my right side EXACTLY where I usually feel my elbow pain. The pain is 10 times worse than when I serve but it's in the same spot, and my left arm is fine. What I'm inferring from this is that it's not about the pronation of the serve but the fact that my elbow injury is a result of high impact activity when my elbow is straight, such as the serve or bicep curl. That being said, still nobody knows what it is..mri came back clean in November.
 

RogueFLIP

Professional
MFR didn't work.

Anyways, there's still plenty of options out there for treatment.
I'm not saying this is a miracle cure, merely to bring your awareness to it
Like I said it's not a miracle cure, it's going to take some time and work (and not just on your symptomatic sites
Please be realistic. You've had a chronic injury for what, over 6 months? And you had what, one or maybe two treatments? Sure, maybe you did the homework that you were given too, but it still hasn't even been a week.

C'mon. I'm not saying that MFR is the answer to your issues, but really. No system is able to cure chronic soft tissue injuries that quick. Because if it did, everyone would be doing it.

Interestingly, I did bicep curls yesterday for the first time in at least a year. I used 15 pound weights and I did 3 sets of bicep curls of 12 reps. I woke up this morning and I am in agonizing pain only on my right side EXACTLY where I usually feel my elbow pain. The pain is 10 times worse than when I serve but it's in the same spot, and my left arm is fine. What I'm inferring from this is that it's not about the pronation of the serve but the fact that my elbow injury is a result of high impact activity when my elbow is straight, such as the serve or bicep curl. That being said, still nobody knows what it is..mri came back clean in November.
Well I hope you recover quickly from your latest setback. Good luck.
 

TennisCanada1

Professional
Please be realistic. You've had a chronic injury for what, over 6 months? And you had what, one or maybe two treatments? Sure, maybe you did the homework that you were given too, but it still hasn't even been a week.

C'mon. I'm not saying that MFR is the answer to your issues, but really. No system is able to cure chronic soft tissue injuries that quick. Because if it did, everyone would be doing it.



Well I hope you recover quickly from your latest setback. Good luck.
No need to get mad. I found that MFR was too alternative for me. I'm all for putting in hard work and waiting long-term to see results, but it was a bit too mystical and farfetched. There wasn't even a massage component. I'm allowed my opinion.
 
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This supports my theory, being that the first surgeon is right, because I predicted that it IS the pronator/lacertus fibrosis syndrome, which involves too much muscle mass in the elbow so there is pain because there is a lack of blood supply/oxygen because the fascia won't stretch to compensate, so I knew that after the 6 week break that I would most likely feel the pain again. I just took the break to satisfy the surgeon and to rule out anything else.
................................................................................
.............................................
Has this been ruled out?

There is a show on CNN where a trauma led to compartmental pressure. It is on at 9 PM (in a few minutes) 3/10, it will be repeated tonight and later this week.
 
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TennisCanada1

Professional
Has this been ruled out.

There is a show on CNN where a trauma led to compartmental pressure. It is on at 9 PM (in a few minutes) 3/10, it will be repeated tonight and later this week.
It hasn't been ruled out, to be honest I have no idea what it is, nobody else does, and the next step now is to keep playing lefty, and let my right elbow heal for 6 months or even a year. I will reassess after 6 months. In the meantime, thanks for all of your help and efforts Chas Tennis, I really, really do appreciate it.
 
It hasn't been ruled out, to be honest I have no idea what it is, nobody else does, and the next step now is to keep playing lefty, and let my right elbow heal for 6 months or even a year. I will reassess after 6 months. In the meantime, thanks for all of your help and efforts Chas Tennis, I really, really do appreciate it.
I don't understand this injury or condition but I would discuss this with the Dr who mentioned the above and your other Drs. The thing above does not seem like anything to let take its own course. In the Canadian health system, if you can't get a firm diagnosis for a considerable time, how do you see a specialist?
I am not following some details of TennisCanada1's injury, but if this describes a similar condition it sounds as if it could be serious. This reference may apply to different circumstances. This sounds like an area requiring a very well qualified specialist.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3193633/

Acute compartment syndrome of forearm and hand
T. Chandraprakasam and R. Ashok Kumar
Author information ► Copyright and License information ►
This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.
Go to:
Abstract

The diagnosis and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome is of paramount importance. Unless the viscious cycle is intervened at an appropriately early time it will result in irreversible damage leading to disability. In this review article we are discussing the basic pathophysiological process through which the various aetiological factors causing increased compartmental pressure lead to the progressive death of muscles and nerves. We also discuss the various clinical features that aid in the diagnosis and the role of intracompartmental pressure measurements. Finally we hope to ascertain the basic principles and the surgical techniques for treating this condition effectively.

I still can't understand why this hurts only for some athletic motions. ?
 
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RogueFLIP

Professional
No need to get mad. I found that MFR was too alternative for me. I'm all for putting in hard work and waiting long-term to see results, but it was a bit too mystical and farfetched. There wasn't even a massage component. I'm allowed my opinion.
This makes a lot more sense. I don't have anything invested in your issue, so I wasn't getting mad, just trying to inject some realism into the situation sorry if it was interpreted in any other way. Really just trying to help a fellow tennis player get back to what we all on this forum love.

Too bad the principles of MFR didn't resonate with you but good on you for trying other things; I hope you find what you're looking for, and good luck with the lefty transition. Saw your video in the other thread, jeez, your lefty FH is already better than my normal FH haha. :)

I'd be curious to know if you're willing to elaborate on what you found with what Sarah said or did that was "too alternative, too mystical and farfetched". Thanks.
 
Research - Acute Compartment Syndrome

The CNN show, Dr Sanjay Gupta Reports: Miles O'Brien: A Life Lost and Found concerned the injury of Acute Compartment Syndrome which was brought on shortly after a heavy camera case fell on Miles O'Brien's forearm. It is repeated on CNN. Internet? I believe that it does not have to be caused by trauma but I don't know.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/tv-veteran-miles-obriens-case-what-is-acute-compartment-syndrome/

Acute & Chronic Compartment Syndrome
http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/compartment-syndrome/Pages/Introduction.aspx

Use for your research. Don't diagnose or treat yourself from internet information. There are probably other injuries with similar symptoms.
 
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TennisCanada1

Professional
I think I figured out what I have.
Before I wasn't able to summon the pain on it's own unless I served.
I found that by straightening my elbow completely, and by externally rotating it outwards, I feel pain.
I think I have a distal bicep tear.
 

TennisCanada1

Professional
UPDATE: It's a miracle....
after 10 months of going through this terrible time of trying to figure out what my elbow issue was, going to 3 elbow specialists in two different countries, 5 physios, a myofascial release expert and other healthcare professionals, I finally figured out what is wrong with me.

I basically gave up hope and was ready to quit tennis for good. I was developing my lefty side, but didn't have much motivation. I decided to give one last physio a try that I randomly looked up. I went to the physio for an initial assessment, and after an hour he told me that "I have a relatively apparent leg length discrepancy, and so everything on my left side is a little bit higher (hip bone, etc) Since my right side is lower, my nervous system was chronically stressed and a nerve got caught that caused deferred pain to my elbow. I went to him last week for treatment and by the time the treatment was done, the pain was GONE. 100% gone. Just like that. After 10 months of trauma to my elbow, it was just gone. We did nerve flossing techniques, rotational techniques, and a lot of different things, but I can't even mentally process how much of a relief it is to just have my problem vanish like that." My tissue in my elbow needs another week to recover after being trapped for so long, but I have taken light serves and I have absolutely no pain whatsoever..

Thanks to everyone who has helped. I really do appreciate it...
 
.................................................................................... I went to the physio for an initial assessment, and after an hour he told me that "I have a relatively apparent leg length discrepancy, and so everything on my left side is a little bit higher (hip bone, etc) Since my right side is lower, my nervous system was chronically stressed and a nerve got caught that caused deferred pain to my elbow. ....................... My tissue in my elbow needs another week to recover after being trapped for so long, but I have taken light serves and I have absolutely no pain whatsoever..

.....................................
Where was the nerve that got caught?
 

TennisCanada1

Professional
My physio said it was where the red region is in this picture, like between the shoulder and neck

http://www.hughston.com/hha/b_12_2_1a.jpg

He said it was because since I'm chronically slouching from my leg length disrespency, the shoulder is being pulled down chronically so it was ocnstant pressure on the nervous system. He did a lot of different techniques including the techniques that I mentioned in my previous posts but also this silicone thing that he rubbed on the are, and he massaged a part of my upper back (where it is supposed to have nerve supply).
 

RogueFLIP

Professional
UPDATE: It's a miracle....
after 10 months of going through this terrible time of trying to figure out what my elbow issue was, going to 3 elbow specialists in two different countries, 5 physios, a myofascial release expert and other healthcare professionals, I finally figured out what is wrong with me.

I basically gave up hope and was ready to quit tennis for good. I was developing my lefty side, but didn't have much motivation. I decided to give one last physio a try that I randomly looked up. I went to the physio for an initial assessment, and after an hour he told me that "I have a relatively apparent leg length discrepancy, and so everything on my left side is a little bit higher (hip bone, etc) Since my right side is lower, my nervous system was chronically stressed and a nerve got caught that caused deferred pain to my elbow. I went to him last week for treatment and by the time the treatment was done, the pain was GONE. 100% gone. Just like that. After 10 months of trauma to my elbow, it was just gone. We did nerve flossing techniques, rotational techniques, and a lot of different things, but I can't even mentally process how much of a relief it is to just have my problem vanish like that." My tissue in my elbow needs another week to recover after being trapped for so long, but I have taken light serves and I have absolutely no pain whatsoever..

Thanks to everyone who has helped. I really do appreciate it...
Well, I'm glad to hear that you're on your way to recovery.

"Find the pain, look elsewhere for the cause" - something I've been alluding to in my previous posts:

If things start to go chronic despite you treating the symptomatic area, you have to look elsewhere for potential "kinks in the chain" so to speak.

People understand the kinetic chain analogy for tennis, on how getting power to hit the ball starts from the ground up.....it's the same thing for injuries.

I've treated people's hips to address and correct their symptomatic elbows.....everything is all connected.
 

TennisCanada1

Professional
Well, I'm glad to hear that you're on your way to recovery.

"Find the pain, look elsewhere for the cause" - something I've been alluding to in my previous posts:
Yup never denied that! Like I said, thank you for your help, I really do appreciate it.

It's just crazy, 10 months and it's done.
 

RogueFLIP

Professional
Too bad you've discontinued training lefty. Imagine you serving righty out wide deuce side, and serving lefty out wide ad side?

Or if you had the time to hit either a righty or lefty forehand?

That'd be crazy!
 

RogueFLIP

Professional
And it's not just you. Hopefully someone else with chronic issues reading this thread will become aware that treating just symptomatic areas is not the way to go.

The system (body) needs to be balanced for things to heal optimally.
 
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