Good videos

I think that was likely the intent of the video, a legit 5.0 v 3.5 and the honest outcome. Kind of a reality check for 3.5 players. I thought the 3.5 had a decent serve, 5.0 not troubled at all.
Reality check is a good way to put it. I thought I was hot stuff going undefeated in the regular season in 3.5, and then he demolished me. I think it's put me on the road to improvement faster though!
 
Reality check is a good way to put it. I thought I was hot stuff going undefeated in the regular season in 3.5, and then he demolished me. I think it's put me on the road to improvement faster though!
I did exactly the same recently against a 4.5 player. Killed the 3.5 Flex league last year and I had been playing very well in 4.0 matches, so had a guy that is a solid 4.5 wanna play. Needless to say the score line was 6/0, 6/3, 6/2, but learned a lot and have a guy I can hit with that really pushes me. You've been doing great and it is good to get access to better players like that. I think you make more improvement playing up than competing at level all the time.

Cheers.
 
I've posted the Bailey YT channel and videos a bunch, but footwork is something I think really separates players in progression and play. A bit crazy, but the principle patterns they yse are excellent for load, balance and pivot points, and recovery through shots. I TRY to use this, but only using a basic subset of everything to focus on plant, pivot, and recover in shots. Watching the pro tournament this week again reinforced how import this is to me.

Anyway, maybe you can find something out of it too.

 
YES, but while the player who is commentating keeps talking about strokes, I am looking at footwork. When the two frames are up, it is so clear that he is flatfooted and perhaps need to look more at footwork, position than strokes. Just my observations.

Cheers, Toby
Very true, being honest I did not even look at other aspects since they were talking about strokes and so, but now ive watched it carefully when you mentioned it, and its true.
There is a big difference in strokes but there is an even more massive difference in footwork, the good player's footwork is miles better and on a whole different planet.
This kind of footwork is automatic for him and it looks very easy and simple, but its not so simple, it takes alot of work to achieve it.
 

IowaGuy

Hall of Fame
Good ideas in that video!

I recently found a new hitting partner who is trying to improve his S&V. I'm also trying to improve my volleys, so perfect! Last weekend we did 2.5 hours of mostly volleying and S&V practice :)

@Curious - how are your volleys coming along? Do you have any hitting partners who are willing to focus on volley practice for an hour or two?
 
I recently found a new hitting partner who is trying to improve his S&V. I'm also trying to improve my volleys, so perfect! Last weekend we did 2.5 hours of mostly volleying and S&V practice
Sounds great. I don't have a hitting partner to practice like that. Ball machine has been the most helpful to improve my volleys. It's the shot that I enjoy hitting most in tennis I think so I get better and better at it. In practice I hardly miss any but in matches ( as you've seen and pointed out a few times) I still struggle at times, mostly because of lunging/reaching too much ie bad footwork, positioning. So in terms of how to hit a volley technically/form-wise I feel quite confident but that is not enough as usual.
 

IowaGuy

Hall of Fame
Sounds great. I don't have a hitting partner to practice like that. Ball machine has been the most helpful to improve my volleys. It's the shot that I enjoy hitting most in tennis I think so I get better and better at it. In practice I hardly miss any but in matches ( as you've seen and pointed out a few times) I still struggle at times, mostly because of lunging/reaching too much ie bad footwork, positioning. So in terms of how to hit a volley technically/form-wise I feel quite confident but that is not enough as usual.
I also have used my ball machine to practice volleys.

IMHO, one thing to be careful/aware of with the ball machine - since you "know" where the shot is coming (i.e. you're set up to hit BH volleys CC, etc.), it can potentially mess with your grip and/or ready position/split step. You have to be extra sure that you're truly using a neutral grip and a neutral ready position so that you're not "cheating" in any way towards the side you know the shot it coming to.

It's so different when you don't know which side you're going to have to volley on! Make sure that you're working enough of this "unknown" into your volley practice, otherwise volleys in matches will be very different than volleys in practice.

Anyway, just wanted to throw that out there as it's something I've noticed myself when using the ball machine for volleys...
 
I also have used my ball machine to practice volleys.

IMHO, one thing to be careful/aware of with the ball machine - since you "know" where the shot is coming (i.e. you're set up to hit BH volleys CC, etc.), it can potentially mess with your grip and/or ready position/split step. You have to be extra sure that you're truly using a neutral grip and a neutral ready position so that you're not "cheating" in any way towards the side you know the shot it coming to.

It's so different when you don't know which side you're going to have to volley on! Make sure that you're working enough of this "unknown" into your volley practice, otherwise volleys in matches will be very different than volleys in practice.

Anyway, just wanted to throw that out there as it's something I've noticed myself when using the ball machine for volleys...
The ball machine has a random feed setting to vary the angle and height of balls but it’s still not like hitting with a player.
 
What's a good speed, spin setting range. I've tried moving in on my ground stroke setting, 45-50 mph 3/4 of max topspin and I couldn't control most of the volleys? Maybe an opponent wouldn't usually rifle it 2-3 ft over net?
 

IowaGuy

Hall of Fame
What's a good speed, spin setting range. I've tried moving in on my ground stroke setting, 45-50 mph 3/4 of max topspin and I couldn't control most of the volleys? Maybe an opponent wouldn't usually rifle it 2-3 ft over net?
Depends how good your opponents are :)

45-50 mph with a good amount of topspin would be a very reasonable passing shot for 4.5-5.0 tennis. (ATP pros hit avg 70-85 MPH, for reference.)

If you can't control a volley against 45mph, you either need to practice a lot more, or only rush the net when you expect a very weak reply (i.e. opponent is in very vulnerable position).

Food for thought...
 
Depends how good your opponents are :)

45-50 mph with a good amount of topspin would be a very reasonable passing shot for 4.5-5.0 tennis. (ATP pros hit avg 70-85 MPH, for reference.)

If you can't control a volley against 45mph, you either need to practice a lot more, or only rush the net when you expect a very weak reply (i.e. opponent is in very vulnerable position).

Food for thought...
Definitely need to practice a lot more, in my 4.0 clinic i'm fed flat/slice which I catch and drive or at shoe top can place back at corners, they're fast feeds but are all between waist/chest height over net.
I'll have more time outside soon with the machine:D
 

IowaGuy

Hall of Fame
Definitely need to practice a lot more, in my 4.0 clinic i'm fed flat/slice which I catch and drive or at shoe top can place back at corners, they're fast feeds but are all between waist/chest height over net.
I'll have more time outside soon with the machine:D
Could be a reaction time issue (you're not used to facing faster shots).

It could also be that your volley is not compact enough against the faster shots (where you don't really need to provide any pace, just redirect the opponent's pace).

Here is one of the best volleyers in the world, Tecau (has won 2 doubles GS). Look how compact his volleys are against some pretty fast shots! (starting ~2:15)

 
Could be a reaction time issue (you're not used to facing faster shots).

It could also be that your volley is not compact enough against the faster shots (where you don't really need to provide any pace, just redirect the opponent's pace).

Here is one of the best volleyers in the world, Tecau (has won 2 doubles GS). Look how compact his volleys are against some pretty fast shots! (starting ~2:15)

Good vid, I probably sometimes just not able to time it from ball machine, need to shorten the time between shots to be more realistic. This will help me keep the core tight and time split step better.
 
found this lately, somehow didnt pop up for me till now. again a beatiful sight from behind court level, with 60fps.
tip: turn the slowmotion on and watch the crazy wrist relaxation =)
All of this guys uploads are great. He has tons of court side practice video. He's just uploaded a lot of new videos.
 
Could be a reaction time issue (you're not used to facing faster shots).

It could also be that your volley is not compact enough against the faster shots (where you don't really need to provide any pace, just redirect the opponent's pace).

Here is one of the best volleyers in the world, Tecau (has won 2 doubles GS). Look how compact his volleys are against some pretty fast shots! (starting ~2:15)

Nice video. He ‘simply’ moves the racket quickly towards the ball’s anticipated trajectory and nicely guides/blocks it towards where he wants it to go. If you think about it that way, volley is probably the easiest shot in tennis.
 

IowaGuy

Hall of Fame
Nice video. He ‘simply’ moves the racket quickly towards the ball’s anticipated trajectory and nicely guides/blocks it towards where he wants it to go. If you think about it that way, volley is probably the easiest shot in tennis.
That is probably true to some extent.

Problem with volleys is that there are so many permutations of the incoming ball - high and slow, low and slow at your feet, low and topspin dipping, fast pace right at you, etc. For S&V, also differences in your court position when volleying (1st volley near service line or 2nd volley closer to net). Plus BH vs. FH volleys are quite different mechanically (kind of like having to learn how to hit both a FH and BH groundstroke just to be able to hit either one of them). Plus need a good overhead otherwise you'll never even see a volley once opponent figures out they can just lob you to death.

All of these combined means lots of reps and skills to learn how to volley well.

Than add the fact that most players only practice volleys for a couple of minutes during warmup and that's why you don't see many good volleys in rec tennis, IMHO.
 
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