Graphenes Are Cracking

Graphene is sort of an emperor's new clothes on Head racquets. It's super expensive, and just about invisible to human eyes. Has anyone actually even found a bit of d3O in their Head racquets? :shock:
 

corners

Legend
It seems like the head graphene frames have been cracking more than usual for rackets. I have already seen one crack while playing. Maybe graphene isn't all that it claims to be.

http://gizmodo.com/5995046/graphene-has-a-fatal-flaw
The takeaways from that linked article are that graphene is probably half as strong as is usually advertised, and that it will form microcracks over time, which will reduce it's stiffness. But graphene is ridiculously stiff, so even if it softens over time you'd be unlikely to notice.

The more important question is how much graphene is Head actually putting in these frames. Given how expensive it is I would guess very little.
 

Slitch

Rookie
My guess is Head only puts a thin sheets of graphene in each racket as a marketing gimmick. Graphene is just too expensive to replace graphite.
 

Automatix

Hall of Fame
First of we all know the techs, even if true and pretty much real in other departments, are marketing gimmicks in tennis racquets.

There was nothing special about racquets which were supposedly built with the use of materials such as D3O or graphene.

Additionally the cost of these materials is big enough to make you think about the way it's supposedly used as well as how much of it is really there, if any - we assume there is some just to hold of a potential law suit.
 

The Meat

Hall of Fame
From all of the pictures of broken graphene speeds, they seem to be made of balsa wood or something. :)
 

corners

Legend
Two frames. Could be bad string jobs causing that. Not sure I'd write off that frame just because of a handful of such reports. (But I probably won't be rushing out to buy them either. :)
 
This thread is making a lot of people **** bricks. The mere mention of these new space-age and innovative material as doing nothing for their game is blasphemy.
 

ricki

Hall of Fame
graphene is just a gimmick, you dont actually believe, that they are using one atom thick layer of graphite to form racquet construction? Not talking about crazy price for such a thin foil
 
Graphene is sort of an emperor's new clothes on Head racquets. It's super expensive, and just about invisible to human eyes. Has anyone actually even found a bit of d3O in their Head racquets? :shock:
I actually tried sawing through a cracked YT Speed to see if there was anything, but my hacksaw was too dull to make a cross-section. However, I didn't spot any orange d3o. I'm just hoping my new Speed doesn't crack now. However that's unlikely because I don't play that much and haven't used it for (relatively short) ages.
 

chaddles

Semi-Pro
Graphene is supposed to be used in the thoat to increase strength, and allowing the distribution of weight to the ends of the racquet. Where those photos show the cracks through the shared holes, they are just defective sticks.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
Defective material is an issue only if it is present in any significant amount. How much of the racket is graphene? I have seen the 2 strips in the throat. Does anybody know the ratio of graphene/graphite in the frame?
 

West Coast Ace

G.O.A.T.
The takeaways from that linked article are that graphene is probably half as strong as is usually advertised, and that it will form microcracks over time, which will reduce it's stiffness. But graphene is ridiculously stiff, so even if it softens over time you'd be unlikely to notice.

The more important question is how much graphene is Head actually putting in these frames. Given how expensive it is I would guess very little.
Great post. Gizmodo is one of the Tech sites I visit; knew someone on this site would take this story and run crazy with it....

Two frames. Could be bad string jobs causing that. Not sure I'd write off that frame just because of a handful of such reports. (But I probably won't be rushing out to buy them either. :)
Thank you. Two data points and someone thinks they can draw the curve through them to explain the behavior.

Graphite that isn't fabbed properly - there can be problems laying the plies, leaving it in the autoclave for the right amount of time, taking it out to cool in the right conditions - not too hot/cold and at the right humidity - can also be prone to crack. Bottom line: all these new materials are not slam dunks to use. I respect Head enough to believe they did plenty of testing. When the Prestige Mid comes out next yr with Graphene I'll have no problem buying it.
 

eidolonshinobi

Professional
So does this mean that head will try and fix this issue or just make another model like they did with the Extremes last year?
 

AlfaAce

Rookie
Regardless of breakage, I like the way they feel. Impressive as far as playability goes. You kids gotta stop throwing your racquets ;)
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
These blogs area about the only source of information for consumers about durability, so one hopes people are reporting non-user attributable faults.
 

Newbie81

New User
Regardless of breakage, I like the way they feel. Impressive as far as playability goes. You kids gotta stop throwing your racquets ;)
I agree on the feel and playability side, but it is definitely not a racket for people with an anger management problem. I threw my racket once and it cracked. So as a word of advice, if you are this kind of player this is not a racket for you!
 
Awesome poast!
Yeah, I will never doubt Head again! Though obviously some weaknesses of Graphene have been discovered; My informant tells me that Head is already planning on releasing the next technological breakthrough, Dark Matter Technology (tm), incorporated in the hoop of the racquet. You can't see it, but your opponent will definitely feel it. It increases the power and dwell time... and optimizes a whole bunch of other things I've never heard of. Oh I just can't wait! :)
 
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There was a recent study on graphene by some scientists at Rice University that actually showed that the compound isn't as stable and strong as previously thought, and instead near the edges of a sheet of graphene there are carbon rings with five or sometimes seven carbon atoms instead of the normal 6. That sort of error in the conventional array can lead to cracks which travel through the whole layer of graphene, which i think might be what you're experiencing. Heres the link to article http://news.rice.edu/2013/03/28/even-graphene-has-weak-spots/
 

droliver

Professional
There was a recent study on graphene by some scientists at Rice University that actually showed that the compound isn't as stable and strong as previously thought, and instead near the edges of a sheet of graphene there are carbon rings with five or sometimes seven carbon atoms instead of the normal 6. That sort of error in the conventional array can lead to cracks which travel through the whole layer of graphene, which i think might be what you're experiencing. Heres the link to article http://news.rice.edu/2013/03/28/even-graphene-has-weak-spots/
Which makes it only 6x as strong as steel per weight. The area those frames are cracked on the hoop is not where that material is applied (to the throat/shaft) apparently.
 

LuchoVena

Rookie
Generous amount of graphene wrapped d3O was found inside my racquet. Thank you Head! :)
holy cow! smart materials looks smart (brain) lmao

Was this from a broken Graphene speed? and is it located actually inside the handle? is d3o around the frame too?
 

tuonino

New User
There is no graphene in in head graphene.
A Graphene sheet is about 10-20 nm and it would take a few dozen of sheets to get the flex rate of a normal racket.
The racket would be 0.001 mm thick or less. You should also consider that a single grephen sheet cost more than 1000$/m² .
 
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