Great Conjunction of Jupiter & Saturn | December 21 2020 | Griffith Observatory

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.


Great Conjunction of Jupiter & Saturn | December 21 2020 | Griffith Observatory
Griffith Observatory
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Watch the Great Conjunction Webcast Live on Monday, December 21, 2020, starting at 4:30 p.m. On Monday, December 21, 2020, the Winter Solstice, planets Jupiter and Saturn will appear in the evening sky very close to each other, at about one-fifth of the Moon's diameter apart. This close approach of the two planets is called a "great conjunction" and occurs when the independent movements of Jupiter and Saturn make them appear close together in the sky. This happens once every 20 years, but they have not been seen this close together since 1226 A.D. If we have clear skies, this conjunction may be seen in the southwestern sky shortly after dark on December 21, and it should be visible from roughly 5:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Jupiter and Saturn will be very close together. Anyone will be able to see the pair with unaided eyes. No telescope or binoculars is required, but a magnified view through a Griffith Observatory telescope will be live streamed. You can also observe both planets and their moons through your own telescope. LIVE WEBCAST: Griffith Observatory will start streaming the winter solstice great conjunction to our YouTube page on Monday, December 21, 2020, at 4:30 p.m., PST. The program will begin with a live view of the sunset, which occurs at 4:48 p.m., PST. A telescopic view of Jupiter and Saturn in conjunction will be streamed live as soon as acquired, in the twilight, perhaps by 5:00 p.m., PST.
 

NonP

Hall of Fame
Haha I just happened to post this rant in a group chat:

Any of you jokers had any luck watching the Great Conjunction/Xmas Star? Gawd most of these online how-tos are almost worse than useless. It was cloudy here in the DMV today so I was gonna have to try the next few days anyway, but I would've been mighty pissed if I did have a great chance to see the thing at its peak.

Here's a useful tutorial (though it assumes you already know when/where to look):

And while I was typing that the Rebel Without a Cause scene did cross my mind, too! This level of (double) coincidence is almost scary, LOL:


Of course we can't let that reference pass without this:


Hope the Griffith reopens soon!

Just checked, I missed it. Ah well....
Today was the peak day. You'll have more chances over the next few days.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Haha I just happened to post this rant in a group chat:



And while I was typing that the Rebel Without a Cause scene did cross my mind, too! This level of (double) coincidence is almost scary, LOL:


Of course we can't let that reference pass without this:


Hope the Griffith reopens soon!



Today was the peak day. You'll have more chances over the next few days.
That's a pretty good coincidence. I used to like going up to the observatory area to clear my mind while I looked over L.A. below. The view can be fantastic on a clear winter day after winds or rain cleared the pollution.

 

NonP

Hall of Fame
That's a pretty good coincidence. I used to like going up to the observatory area to clear my mind while I looked over L.A. below. The view can be fantastic on a clear winter day after winds or rain cleared the pollution.

Hey the stargazing is even cooler! But yes, the best (over)view of LA, bar none, which makes it one of the two attractions I can heartily recommend in this most overrated of all cities.

And as you may well know nearby is Frank Lloyd Wright's magnificent Hollyhock House. It ain't free (almost nothing in LA is), but $7 for a self-guided tour of that beauty is well worth it. Wasn't a fan of the ugly fences surrounding the downhill side, though. Wonder if they ever got rid of 'em:

 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Saw this over a farm field last night, had binoculars and the family. A bit chilly, but well worth it.
It was foggy outside my house. When I started this thread, the Griffith Observatory YouTube video was live.
 
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