Guess how much my emergency appendectomy cost? *invoice*

How much was my emergency appendectomy?

  • $14,826

  • $28,826

  • $44,826

  • Slightly less than the new Wilson Clash


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movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Does "salary" factor in their pensions and benefits?

Without looking to deep, i would look at private schools with more than 1000 students (or whatever is a good number). Some private schools are basically home schooling with 5-7 kids, i could see how they would lower the average

Salary doesn't include benefits. But public school teachers generally get generous pension and healthcare benefits, better than private school teachers.

I wasn't able to find the methodology for the NCES data so I don't have their precise definition as to what they consider a private school and I am not inclined to dig into this. However, everything that I did see, including articles from Monster.com and Payscale, indicate that salaries offered, and salaries reported, are higher for public schools than private schools. I could find no research evidence to support your case that private school teachers are paid more than public school teachers. And that's true whether you're talking salaries or salaries and benefits.

Do you have any research to make your case?

There's abundant research for my side.

I could probably get the data on very small private schools in my state as that is recorded a the State DOE. I'd guess that the total number of students at very small schools is pretty small as these schools have difficult economies of scale. We homeschooled for 15 years and I was pretty well plugged into the community during that time and I didn't see these small, private schools as a factor. I heard that they were daycare operations that operated like this but not small, private schools.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I've never been admitted to hospital. I hope I'll never be.

That was true for me two years ago and I was 57 at the time.

But there are far more procedures to fix things that can be done on an outpatient basis or even in a doctors office today than in the past.
 

speedysteve

Legend
The NHS has been systematically destroyed over the years and that's the stragegy.

Take a public service and both starve it of funds and let private operators milk it to death.

In the end, everyone no longer thinks the public service is worth the expense and get resentful about it.
Perhaps I've been lucky in the postcode lotteries you hear about..
It could be better yes.. go to a system like US have? No way.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Insurance didn't cover all costs so got over $1K out of pocket. Here's an article about someone going to the ER in Taiwan. https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/he...-of-socialized-medicine/ar-BBUeeK1?li=BBnb7Kz

Here's the story of a lady (I've chatted with her and her husband) with Metastatic cancer cured by a new procedure at the National Cancer Institute (no costs as it was a clinical trial). This wasn't available anywhere else in the world at that time. I don't think that it is even today. Though some hospitals have or are building the labs to do it.

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1609279

Singapore's system was very good while we were there. I haven't studied Taiwan's system.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Michelle Lowry was a healthy baby until a pea-sized lump appeared on her neck when she was two. Within weeks it had swelled into a life-threatening tumor obstructing her breathing and she was hospitalized at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles.

A test showed her tumor was caused by a so-called NTRK fusion, which happens when a gene known as NTRK fuses with another unrelated gene. Such fusions are found in about 1% of solid tumors and can cause cancer in virtually any tissue type in the body. Her doctors got her enrolled in a clinical trial where she was able to take an experimental drug called larotrectinib.

Within days the tumor shrank; within weeks it wasn’t even visible. Today, Michelle is a happy 3-year-old who loves Disney princesses and belting out Vampirina songs, doing puzzles, and helping her parents cook. The most recent MRI and CT scans show no residual disease in her neck or chest, say her father, Joseph Lowry, and doctors.


https://www.wsj.com/articles/new-ca...lternatives-to-chemo-11551284726?mod=djemHL_t

This drug was developed by a company in Stamford, CT. Bayer has full licensing rights and is producing and selling the drug. So foreign pharma companies, of course, like to get into drugs which make profits as much as US companies. This is targeted treatment where your tumor is tested and treatment is based on your mutation. It is far less invasive and damaging to the body than chemo, radiation and surgery. But patients have to take a Genomic Tumor Test to determine whether or not their tumor can be cured with the new targeted therapies. In Germany, this test costs $5,000 and isn't covered by their national healthcare system. I actually don't know any national healthcare systems that cover this test though Canada is doing a clinical trial to determine whether or not it is worthwhile. In the United States, it's not standard of care so most insurance won't cover it unless the oncologist makes a case for it. I think that they do it routinely at Dana Farber Cancer Institute as I know someone that receives a targeted treatment for lung cancer and they would have had to do this test to determine the mutation. I know that they do this at Mass General Hospital as they did it for me. I asked my oncologist to do the test two years ago and he blew me off.

I personally think that it should be standard of care as it can mean the difference between life and death or between conventional treatment and something a lot easier with far fewer permanent side-effects. If we keep making more of these targeted treatments, it will likely become standard of care. I expect that the price of the testing will decline with time too.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
For Michelle, after blood tests and an ultrasound yielded no clues she got a biopsy and took a test to analyze the biological markers of her tumor. Results showed Michelle had a rare type of cancer, low-grade spindle cell sarcoma with an NTRK fusion.
On Dec. 2 she had her first dose of larotrectinib. By the next day her parents say she was back to sitting up and talking.
“Michelle was near death,” says Dr. Mascarenhas, who was hired by Bayer in October to be in their speaker’s bureau but terminated that relationship this month. “And she turned around and left the ICU in 24 hours. She was discharged from the hospital three days after we started the medicine.”


The drug costs $11,000 to $32,800 per month. It appears that some people are cured by short-term treatment and others have to take it on an ongoing basis. I would suspect that the profits from this drug will result in the development of drugs to cure or allow people to survive for other mutations.

Do you want these kinds of drugs available in your country?
 

Zardoz7/12

Hall of Fame
USA needs a National Health Service but I'm guessing that would cost a fortune to implement in America, maybe it's the softy in me but you shouldn't be paying that much money for an appendectomy.
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
Strangely enough, some people actually cite data as opposed to claiming they've researched the matter.

My guess is that public schools are more uniform in their pay scales, whereas private schools vary wildly due to the diverse nature of the schools contained under that rubric.

What usually is compared where I come from is the Anglican, Catholic, and public systems.

My guess is that in America private schools pay more when you focus the criteria to make them more comparable to the public system.

This guess is based on the fact that big private school systems poach good staff from the public system and Catholics even have their own training systems for teacher entry.

These guesses may be wrong, but they hold true where I come from and, as always with statistics, you need to find a way to compare like with like.

I wasn't able to find the methodology for the NCES data so I don't have their precise definition as to what they consider a private school and I am not inclined to dig into this. However, everything that I did see, including articles from Monster.com and Payscale, indicate that salaries offered, and salaries reported, are higher for public schools than private schools. I could find no research evidence to support your case that private school teachers are paid more than public school teachers. And that's true whether you're talking salaries or salaries and benefits.

Do you have any research to make your case?

There's abundant research for my side.

 

Sander001

Hall of Fame
I got it right.

We have a very messed up medical system. I hope you live in a state which prohibits balance billing which should obviously be illegal everywhere but isn’t because it sounds “socialist.” Anytime you can’t scr$w people it’s “socialist.”

I hope it all worked out well for you.
:-D Reminds me of this

2grvjcbq16m21.jpg


Kind of a bad joke at this point, whenever a plutocrat refuses to improve the lives of their constituency, they’ll defend it by saying it would be socialism to do so :laughing:
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
They were being very cautious. A CT scan for Norovirus is a bit surprising. Also, she had a private room when normally a semiprivate room is covered but it is understandable for something contagious.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
They were being very cautious. A CT scan for Norovirus is a bit surprising. Also, she had a private room when normally a semiprivate room is covered but it is understandable for something contagious.

Hi Mr Mov ... yeah, they had the yellow tape and gloves and masks flying. Somehow she managed to get e coli at the same time ... primary doc said he had never seen that happen (both noro and e coli). Make it a Trifecta ... got a UTI. Hard on a 83 year old, but she is ex-tennis USTA 3.5 player jock ... so tough for a 100 pounder.

Oh ... CT Scan, she had a previous bowel blockage and surgery before. That was when I was freaking out waiting for that result to come back. The ambulance took her in around 2 am, and CT was around 6 am.
 
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