Gustavo Kuerten: ATP Forehand?

#10
So an ATP forehand is when racket doesn't drop early???...What IS an ATP forehand??
'ATP' forehand uses muscle stretch/extend: the kinetic chain/drive/pull/whatever happens before the wrist is laid back ie. the tip of the racquet doesn't go behind the hand until this happens. The 'WTA' style forehand the wrist is laid back all the way through the stroke.

This part is the most obvious, his wrist will lay back due to the kinetic chain, not before

 
#11
Is the "ATP forehand" considered to be better than the alternative? What do you consider Nadal? And is there any correlation to what court surface someone is best suited to? I'm not sure there is any reason to believe that laying back the wrist sooner or later has much of an impact on the results of the stroke.
 
#12
Is the "ATP forehand" considered to be better than the alternative? What do you consider Nadal? And is there any correlation to what court surface someone is best suited to? I'm not sure there is any reason to believe that laying back the wrist sooner or later has much of an impact on the results of the stroke.
Nadal is obviously ATP. One of the best versions actually.
 
#14
I watched a youtube vid with a couple of guys describing this in a lot of detail. Anyway, I don't think it was described quite right in this thread unless those 2 guys got it wrong.

After watching the video I think Guga is using an ATP forehand. Nadal as well.

 
#15
For my money, the fact that Guga is maintaining an open stance with a full unit turn makes it more of a "modern forehand" Than whatever he does with his wrist.

Notice how Murray has a fairly closed stance despite it being so called "atp"
Very little torque happening with the lower body for Sir Andy.
 
#17
Modern ATP forehands are obviously worse than the ATP forehands of Guga's era. Guga's peers are all way over the hill, but still beating up on the guys currently in their prime.
 

jga111

Hall of Fame
#19
Nadal seems to lay his wrist back early. I'm still confused on what this ATP designation actually means I think.
Yeah I know what you mean. In Nadal's case he does lock it back, but not all the way, and then you see as he does swing forward, he keeps his wrist loose introducing the racket lag.

In Guga's case, I'm not seeing a lag and his wrist appears to be more rigid.
 
#20
Nadal seems to lay his wrist back early. I'm still confused on what this ATP designation actually means I think.
He may during part of the backswing but like the pic of Murray above, it's this position that shows it. The racquet drops down to this position ('tap the dog') before the wrist gets forced back from the swing (thereby using stretch/extend unlike the 'WTA' forehand where the wrist just stays back)



http://www.**************.org/imgb/58781/atp-barcelona-peerless-rafael-nadal-tops-tsitsipas-to-defend-the-title.jpg
 
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#21
Of course the other problem with naming these strokes and asking questions about them based on the names is that every high ranked pro player has at least a few situational variations. It might be the combination of their "rally" shot and how well they vary it in pressure situations that makes them so good. Nadal is certainly one of the best at pressured situational variety, or PSV, for those that like to throw around acronyms. :)
 
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