Half court tennis

diggler

Professional
Tennis is still allowed in Australia but not doubles. I'm too old and fat to play singles so I have modified rules. I draw a line from the centre mark to where the service line joins the centre service line. The opponent does the same. I serve as normal but the when rallying, the court includes the doubles alley. This makes the court size more manageable. Does anyone else do this?
 
Yes, I have a buddy who had knee surgery and his movement was just too compromised to play singles effectively, but can play half court like this great. It's actually a great way to play if you want to hit a lot of balls. I've also changed it up where the returner still gets the double alleys on returns (this changes the game a bit where the server may then decide to start off more in a doubles type serve position, but obviously doesn't have to).

My only frustration with this style of play is that coming to the net and volleying isn't as intuitive as when you play normally because you are forced to volley back to the player versus the open court. But I quickly learned that this just makes you hit better approach shots and makes you focus on hitting solid deep volleys (or drop volleys), so it can still be beneficial. Overheads are no longer easy put aways either, so you really learn more pinpoint precision on those. My buddy will also run around backhands since the court is so much smaller, but that's his choice. I try not to run around balls to be sure I'm getting to work on both wings appropriately.
 

travlerajm

G.O.A.T.
I like this game for when I’m playing on a wet court in light rain. You can still work on your shots and play points, just without the sprinting.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
It's called shadow doubles or 1v1 doubles.

It's very easy if you play doubles, or train like this to build shot tolerance and not do dumb stuff.

The only issue is overheads.

J
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
Tennis is still allowed in Australia but not doubles. I'm too old and fat to play singles so I have modified rules. I draw a line from the centre mark to where the service line joins the centre service line. The opponent does the same. I serve as normal but the when rallying, the court includes the doubles alley. This makes the court size more manageable. Does anyone else do this?
What do you mean you draw a line? A real one or an imaginary one?
 

diggler

Professional
What do you mean you draw a line? A real one or an imaginary one?
In Australia we typically play on artificial grass which has sand in the surface. I just drag my foot to make a line in the sand. Of course it is not as visible as a real line. Both players know where the line is meant to be. I've never had a dispute because we play not on a win at all costs basis.
 

diggler

Professional
I've also changed it up where the returner still gets the double alleys on returns (this changes the game a bit where the server may then decide to start off more in a doubles type serve position, but obviously doesn't have to).

My only frustration with this style of play is that coming to the net and volleying isn't as intuitive as when you play normally because you are forced to volley back to the player versus the open court. But I quickly learned that this just makes you hit better approach shots and makes you focus on hitting solid deep volleys (or drop volleys), so it can still be beneficial. Overheads are no longer easy put aways either, so you really learn more pinpoint precision on those. My buddy will also run around backhands since the court is so much smaller, but that's his choice. I try not to run around balls to be sure I'm getting to work on both wings appropriately.
I always play with the doubles alley on all shots except the serve. I actually find it similar to doubles. I volley back to the player because their partner is normally covering the other side of the court.
 
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