Half Dozen Game

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
6. The Clash is an obvious choice, but it was my first favorite band back when I was in high school. I got to see them in high school, and eventually met Joe Strummer long after the band broke up.


Descendents are a more obscure band from the early Orange County punk scene. I got to hang out with Milo Aukerman a few times when I was in college.


Suburban Homes:

1. Mira Mesa, California
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Note also that Açores = Azores (Eng & Spanish)
I can’t tell why Brazil is written with z in English while in its original Portuguese is written with s, which derives from the pau brasil tree.
For the same reason that
United States of America =>

Estados Unidos da America (Port.)
Estados Unidos de América (Spanish)
Les états-unis d'Amérique .. (French)

I believe that the English, Brazil, is also pronounced a bit differently from the Portuguese, Brasil.

Additionally, American English uses a Z where British English often uses an S: realize, apologize, cozy, monetize, idealize, legalize, penalize, etc

Note that my own surname is Portuguese. We spell it as Rapoza whereas the more common Portuguese spelling is Raposa
 
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SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
I can’t tell why Brazil is written with z in English while in its original Portuguese is written with s, which derives from the pau brasil tree.
Mas Que Nada

2+ years ago, I noticed that this phrase was pronounced a bit differently in Portuguese than it is in Spanish. (Sometimes it is spelled as Mais Que Nada). Strangely, it means nearly the opposite in Portuguese than it does in Spanish. The lyrics, in the song below, makes a lot more sense when you realize that the meaning of the phrase, Mas Que Nada, means something quite different in Portuguese than in Spanish:

 

happyandbob

Hall of Fame
I can’t tell why Brazil is written with z in English while in its original Portuguese is written with s, which derives from the pau brasil tree.
At least that's close to what Brazilians call their own country. Finland calls itself Suomi!

Germany = Deutschland
Hungary = Magyarország
Croatia = Hrvatska
Greece = Hellas
Sweden = Sverige
Canada = 51st state ;)
 
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Sudacafan

Bionic Poster
Mas Que Nada

2+ years ago, I noticed that this phrase was pronounced a bit differently in Portuguese than it is in Spanish. (Sometimes it is spelled as Mais Que Nada). Strangely, it means nearly the opposite in Portuguese than it does in Spanish. The lyrics, in the song below, makes a lot more sense when you realize that the meaning of the phrase, Mas Que Nada, means something quite different in Portuguese than in Spanish:

I think this originates in the confusion that many people have about the name of that song.

There are two different words in Portuguese:
Mas: equivalent to but in English
Mais: equivalent to more in English

The correct spelling of the title of the song in Portuguese is Mas Que Nada.
Therefore, the translation to English More Than Anything would be incorrect. The translation to English of the expression mas que nada is very difficult, as there is no literal equivalent.

In Spanish, there’s also two different words. Those would be:
Mas: equivalent to but in English
Más: equivalent to more in English
It doesn’t help that in Spanish both words are pronounced exactly the same though they have different meanings.

I think there was a discussion about this some time ago.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
I think this originates in the confusion that many people have about the name of that song.

There are two different words in Portuguese:
Mas: equivalent to but in English
Mais: equivalent to more in English

The correct spelling of the title of the song in Portuguese is Mas Que Nada.
Therefore, the translation to English More Than Anything would be incorrect. The translation to English of the expression mas que nada is very difficult, as there is no literal equivalent.

In Spanish, there’s also two different words. Those would be:
Mas: equivalent to but in English
Más: equivalent to more in English
It doesn’t help that in Spanish both words are pronounced exactly the same though they have different meanings.

I think there was a discussion about this some time ago.
Sometimes the song title has been spelled using Mais. However quite a few sources indicate that this was a spelling error (and does not convey the intended meaning).

Many sources indicate that the phrase, "mas que nada" is sarcastic expression often used in Brasil. Most English translations of the title & lyrics often have it as a sarcastic "Whatever!". Also translated as a "Say no more".

From the following version from Sergio Mendes with Tom Jones, it appears that this meaning / sentiment is expressed. However, the phrase "More than Anything" is also used. A few other versions also do the same. This would appear to give a dual meaning to the phrase, "Mas que nada"

 
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