Happy 40th Birthday, Lleyton Hewitt!

Enceladus

Legend
Lleyton Hewitt, who is celebrating his 40th birthday today, spent a total of 80 weeks at the beginning of the 3rd millennium as the world's number one of men's tennis. When he first reached the top of the rankings in November 2001, he was 20 years old and nine months old, a record to this day. At the time, the Australian also celebrated his greatest success in tournaments such as the 2001 US Open and Wimbledon 2002 triumphs.

The sports genes were inherited by a native of Adelaide, South Australia, from both parents, his father played Australian football, and his mother taught physical education. Lleyton first followed in his father's footsteps, but at the age of 13 he abandoned the typical Australian team game and began playing tennis.

He won his first ATP tournament in January 1998 as a teenager - on the hard surface in Adelaide he defeated Andre Agassi on the way to the final at the time - and when he raised the winner's cup over his head, he was six weeks short of seventeen. Hewitt is not only historically the youngest world leader, but also the youngest winner of the ATP Tour.

Hewitt has won a total of 30 singles tournaments in his career - twice dominating the WTF (2001 and 2002) - plus three doubles triumphs, including a Grand Slam (US Open 2000). In addition, he twice helped Australia triumph in the Davis Cup (1999 and 2003).

He officially ended his career at the home Australian Open in 2016, where he lost to David Ferrer in the last professional match. However, he did not leave tennis, led the Davis Cup team in Australia and from time to time competes in doubles tournaments.
 

Gizo

Hall of Fame
Happy birthday to Hewitt.

I was recently watching highlights of his epic, high quality battle against Agassi in the 2002 San Jose final:


I think the full match is also available on YouTube as well.
 

Dan Lobb

G.O.A.T.
Lleyton Hewitt, who is celebrating his 40th birthday today, spent a total of 80 weeks at the beginning of the 3rd millennium as the world's number one of men's tennis. When he first reached the top of the rankings in November 2001, he was 20 years old and nine months old, a record to this day. At the time, the Australian also celebrated his greatest success in tournaments such as the 2001 US Open and Wimbledon 2002 triumphs.

The sports genes were inherited by a native of Adelaide, South Australia, from both parents, his father played Australian football, and his mother taught physical education. Lleyton first followed in his father's footsteps, but at the age of 13 he abandoned the typical Australian team game and began playing tennis.

He won his first ATP tournament in January 1998 as a teenager - on the hard surface in Adelaide he defeated Andre Agassi on the way to the final at the time - and when he raised the winner's cup over his head, he was six weeks short of seventeen. Hewitt is not only historically the youngest world leader, but also the youngest winner of the ATP Tour.

Hewitt has won a total of 30 singles tournaments in his career - twice dominating the WTF (2001 and 2002) - plus three doubles triumphs, including a Grand Slam (US Open 2000). In addition, he twice helped Australia triumph in the Davis Cup (1999 and 2003).

He officially ended his career at the home Australian Open in 2016, where he lost to David Ferrer in the last professional match. However, he did not leave tennis, led the Davis Cup team in Australia and from time to time competes in doubles tournaments.
Correction....youngest world number one in the ATP era, post-1973.
Second-youngest world number one all-time.
 

Enceladus

Legend
Correction....youngest world number one in the ATP era, post-1973.
Second-youngest world number one all-time.
The world number ones before the ATP rankings are not full-fledged, they were determined by tennis journalists, who often could not agree among themselves.
 

NatF

Bionic Poster
Happy birthday to Hewitt.

I was recently watching highlights of his epic, high quality battle against Agassi in the 2002 San Jose final:


I think the full match is also available on YouTube as well.

One of the best BO3 matches I've seen, super high quality for what would be an ATO 250 tournament now.
 

Dan Lobb

G.O.A.T.
The world number ones before the ATP rankings are not full-fledged, they were determined by tennis journalists, who often could not agree among themselves.
Not always, there were point rankings similar to the current ATP rankings in 1946, 1959, 1960, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1972.
The current type of system goes back a long way.

The 1953 ranking which selected a 19-year-old youngest ever world No. 1 was a collaborative ranking by a group of journalists which examined the full season.
 
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