Has a director/supervisor ever overruled an umpire?

mightyrick

Legend
I'm really curious if anyone knows this? I was thinking about this after the call the umpire made on Djokovic's illegal shot.

I just realized in all my years of watching tennis, I have never once seen (live or on video) a tournament director or supervisor reverse a chair umpire's call. Yet players always want to call out the supervisor to plead their case.

Has anyone else seen this? Or does anyone have a youtube video of a tourney director/supervisor reversing a call made by a chair ump? I'd love to see it.
 

Tenez101

Banned
I know there's a famous McEnroe-Nastase match (at the US Open I think?) where the umpire got replaced mid-match by the supervisor. Can't think of an example of what you're thinking of though.
 

Beacon Hill

Hall of Fame
I'm really curious if anyone knows this? I was thinking about this after the call the umpire made on Djokovic's illegal shot.

I just realized in all my years of watching tennis, I have never once seen (live or on video) a tournament director or supervisor reverse a chair umpire's call. Yet players always want to call out the supervisor to plead their case.

Has anyone else seen this? Or does anyone have a youtube video of a tourney director/supervisor reversing a call made by a chair ump? I'd love to see it.
It would only happen if a chair umpire didn't know a rule. It can't happen if an umpire sees something incorrectly. That is just unlikely to happen.
 

tennis_pro

Bionic Poster
It would only happen if a chair umpire didn't know a rule. It can't happen if an umpire sees something incorrectly. That is just unlikely to happen.
If the supervisor's only job is to tell the player when he's asking for him that he "can't change the umpire's decision" then make me one! The easiest job in the world.
 
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Moose Malloy

G.O.A.T.
NEW YORK — After top-seeded Stefan Edberg's abrupt first-round departure, the U.S. Open was plodding along. Until Andre Agassi opened his mouth.

Agassi's temper display and alleged spitting at the umpire in last night's 7-5, 5-7, 6-0, 6-4 second-round victory over Petr Korda was vintage John McEnroe. Agassi's language, while mild by today's public standards, was as off-color as his new basic-lime green outfit.

He temporarily lost his grip in the 11th game of the second set on the National Tennis Center's Louis Armstrong Stadium Court, and yelled at chair umpire Wayne McKewen, of Australia, after he overruled a linesman's call in Korda's favor.

Although Agassi later denied swearing, "son of a *****" was heard clearly on the live television feed. The Open's No. 4 seed received a warning for an audible obscenity.

Korda won the game to lead, 6-5, and, during the changeover, Agassi suddenly jumped from his chair, walked toward McKewen and, with the panicked expression of someone who knows he has bent the rules too far, said, "You can't do that to me! What the hell's going on here?"

The Open's highest seeded American man had just learned he had been assessed a code violation and point penalty for spitting at McKewen, which meant he would begin the critical 12th game trailing, 0-15. He also would be one more violation away from the humiliation of being defaulted out of the Open.

The point penalty was rescinded after tournament referee Keith V. Johnson and Grand Prix supervisor Ken Farrar met with McKewen at the chair. Farrar said McKewen had misunderstood and should not have assessed the point penalty.
http://articles.philly.com/1990-08-31/sports/25932629_1_fire-agassi-umpire-grand-prix-supervisor
 

jrs

Professional
That was great Umpire

I remember that match - was the Umpire Frank Hammond? I thought the Supervisor replaced him. The umpire gave the match to McEnroe as Nastase refused play with the crowd noise.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1350&dat=19790830&id=LzFPAAAAIBAJ&sjid=jAIEAAAAIBAJ&pg=6897,6045725

I believe later on there was Amex commercial where Mac went apologize to the guy....hmmm will have to youtube it. (Edit: Youtube Mac apologizes to another umpire!)

With regards to the OP - I don't think a supervisor can over rule on a judgement call.
 
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tacou

G.O.A.T.
It would only happen if a chair umpire didn't know a rule. It can't happen if an umpire sees something incorrectly. That is just unlikely to happen.
Yeah the supervisor always comes out with a shrug, basically saying I didn't see it, nothing can be done. Yet every time a supervisor is called its ~10 minutes stop in play. I don't know why they even indulge the players, can't the supervisor use his/her awesome walkie talkie?
 

Bartelby

Bionic Poster
I think the supervisor is there for an appeal based on tennis law and can't alter a decision as such if it is lawful.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
Say the chair umpire made a mistake, calling the score as 30-all instead of 15-40. Server isn't sure; returner goes ballistic.

If the returner called for the supervisor, could the supervisor correct the mistake, perhaps by asking the replay crew, asking linespersons?
 

Moose Malloy

G.O.A.T.
^sort of similar situation:

Confusion about the score came with Gaudio serving at 5-2 in the tiebreaker. He erroneously served from the deuce side of the court, and neither Nalbandian nor chair umpire Andreas Egli noticed the mistake until after the point, which Gaudio won for a 6-2 lead.

The point counted, and Egli told Gaudio to serve again from the deuce side. Nalbandian, frustrated that the set was slipping away, briefly argued.

"So now he's going to serve two points to the same side?" Nalbandian said. "Maybe you have to change to another umpire."

Gaudio was amused by his mistake.

"I made history," he said. "It's the first time something like that happened in the French Open."

With the situation resolved, Nalbandian overcame three consecutive set points to reach 6-5, but Gaudio then closed out the set with an overhead slam.

Regarding the confusion about the score in the tiebreaker, Nalbandian faulted Egli.

"He did a very big mistake, like both of us," Nalbandian said. "The umpire has to be concentrating on the game. I think that kind of mistake is so big, they have to have a fine or something."
http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/sports/tennis/french/2004-06-04-day-12_x.htm
 

Fifth Set

Professional
This happened at Stanford a couple years ago, in a fascinating match where I was in attendance. It was one of the most pathetic displays of all around officiating ever. Cirstea had many bad calls in the first set alone and finally had enough.

I need not say much about the actual incident because the video (and Cirstea's solid arguments) explains it all. Girl could be a great trial lawyer after her tour days!

Also, I love Sorana's expression at 1:05! Hot.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lAZ9JtLHes8
 

Beacon Hill

Hall of Fame
Yeah the supervisor always comes out with a shrug, basically saying I didn't see it, nothing can be done. Yet every time a supervisor is called its ~10 minutes stop in play. I don't know why they even indulge the players, can't the supervisor use his/her awesome walkie talkie?
It has nothing to do with the supervisor not seeing the incident. The chair umpire is the final arbiter of determining matters like whether a ball was in or out, whether a player made contact with or reached over the net etc. The supervisor can't overrule any of these things. But if the umpire incorrectly gave a point penalty on a time violation instead of a loss of first serve, or told a player that medical time outs are not allowed, or otherwise did not know the rules, then the supervisor could intervene.
 
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