Head on the Cover of Tennis Magazine

themitchmann

Hall of Fame
I'm sorry, but apparently Tennis Magazine has completely sold out. This is the second issue in a row that utilizes the entire cover to advertise Head racquets. What's up with that?

I know it brings in ad revenue, but selling a cover as ad space...come on!
 

rich s

Hall of Fame
tear the entire front and back cover off like I did..... no big deal....


.... this should probably be in "odds and ends" instead of "racquets"
 

corners

Legend
I'm sorry, but apparently Tennis Magazine has completely sold out. This is the second issue in a row that utilizes the entire cover to advertise Head racquets. What's up with that?

I know it brings in ad revenue, but selling a cover as ad space...come on!
Tennis Magazine very nearly went bankrupt a couple years ago. Consequently, they let go of nearly their entire staff. I believe they were down to two or three people at one point. They have since hired a couple new people but it's my understanding that it is a very bare-bones outfit at this point. I think much of what they do is smoke and mirrors - just a few people creating actual content with a lot of advertorial filler stuff provided by their "partners". And yeah, they have completely sold out. The advertising revenue, nearly all from equipment manufacturers, is the only thing that keeps them going. They aren't making money selling magazines, that's for sure. It's basically a glorified trade magazine at this point, the trade being the tennis equipment industry.

Their bloggers, Steve Tignor and Peter Bodo, who were recently re-branded as "columnists", are really the only real assets the magazine has, IMHO, Tignor in particular.
 
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nyc

Hall of Fame
I think Tennis Magazine has slipped into irrelevance about 3-4 years ago when it became a thin, superficial advertorial.
 

nyc

Hall of Fame
Tennis Magazine very nearly went bankrupt a couple years ago. Consequently, they let go of nearly their entire staff. I believe they were down to two or three people at one point. They have since hired a couple new people but it's my understanding that it is a very bare-bones outfit at this point. I think much of what they do is smoke and mirrors - just a few people creating actual content with a lot of advertorial filler stuff provided by their "partners". And yeah, they have completely sold out. The advertising revenue, nearly all from equipment manufacturers, is the only thing that keeps them going. They aren't making money selling magazines, that's for sure. It's basically a glorified trade magazine at this point, the trade being the tennis equipment industry.

Their bloggers, Steve Tignor and Peter Bodo, who were recently re-branded as "columnists", are really the only real assets the magazine has, IMHO, Tignor in particular.
Beat me to it!
 

themitchmann

Hall of Fame
The ad is mocked up to look exactly like a cover, so I consider it a cover.

When I get a Tennis Pro magazine with a "wrapper," it is obvious (usually using a different finish on the paper.
 

big ted

Hall of Fame
the magazine is pretty much irrelevant now and alot of it has to do with the internet, cable, and the tennis channel. they have to make the magazine at least a month in advance and by that time it comes out the news stories are old by then. i think they could be better off making a weekly newspaper type of publication
 

corners

Legend
the magazine is pretty much irrelevant now and alot of it has to do with the internet, cable, and the tennis channel. they have to make the magazine at least a month in advance and by that time it comes out the news stories are old by then. i think they could be better off making a weekly newspaper type of publication
I think their new website is pretty good, but aside form the blogs/commentary by Tignor and Bodo, most of the rest of their content is thinly veiled advertisements. But yeah, it's all due to other media taking attention from traditional print. All magazines are struggling now.
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
^^ exactly. As of the start of 2013, Newsweek no longer exists on paper in the US. As with newspapers, the attrition has begun.
 

JGads

Legend
Tennis Magazine very nearly went bankrupt a couple years ago. Consequently, they let go of nearly their entire staff. I believe they were down to two or three people at one point. They have since hired a couple new people but it's my understanding that it is a very bare-bones outfit at this point. I think much of what they do is smoke and mirrors - just a few people creating actual content with a lot of advertorial filler stuff provided by their "partners". And yeah, they have completely sold out. The advertising revenue, nearly all from equipment manufacturers, is the only thing that keeps them going. They aren't making money selling magazines, that's for sure. It's basically a glorified trade magazine at this point, the trade being the tennis equipment industry.

Their bloggers, Steve Tignor and Peter Bodo, who were recently re-branded as "columnists", are really the only real assets the magazine has, IMHO, Tignor in particular.
Tignor is a very solid writer and the mag's website is much improved now. Bodo, though, is not what I would call an asset.
 

babar

Professional
I've been getting Tennis Magazine for 20 years. When I first began to play, the content was new, fresh, informative, and welcome. As I progressed as a tennis player, I found the content to be repetitive, uninteresting, out-of-date, and not worth my time.

I enjoy reading magazines, but good ones are hard to come by these days. I have found web content to replace most of what Tennis Magazine has to offer. I believe mine goes straight to the trash these days. I assume I still get a copy as part of my USTA subscription, but not sure about that either.

My kids like to hang out in the library and at local bookstores, but I have never seen Tennis Magazine there and I've looked for it.

I am glad that sites like TW are doing well and that we can share news, insights, inquiries, and commercial issues. Thanks TW!
 

redbirdone

New User
I've been getting Tennis Magazine for 20 years. When I first began to play, the content was new, fresh, informative, and welcome. As I progressed as a tennis player, I found the content to be repetitive, uninteresting, out-of-date, and not worth my time.
I don't read Tennis Magazine, but was a big Golf Magazine reader for years and know exactly what you're saying. It seemed like every other issue was "gain 20 yards" or "make more putts." It became so redundant. And the equipment reviews started to become a joke. Seemed they loved everything and anything that advertisers-I mean manufacturers brought to them.
 

Turbo-87

Legend
I think Tennis Magazine has slipped into irrelevance about 3-4 years ago when it became a thin, superficial advertorial.
Funny that you say that. When I was a kid I remember it was a thick magazine full of good stuff. When I signed up for USTA 20 years later, I got this pamphlet in the mail that turned out to be Tennis magazine. :|
 

corners

Legend
Tignor is a very solid writer and the mag's website is much improved now. Bodo, though, is not what I would call an asset.
Yeah, I remember a poster ripping Bodo on the boards awhile back, calling him an old woman who would do better writing for the likes of People magazine. I still read sometimes him though. Tignor, on the other hand, is the world's best tennis writer, IMHO. Especially when you consider he's writing 4-5 columns a week. That's a lot of writing; it's tough to keep the quality high with that volume. But I almost always finish reading his pieces simply because he's such a good natural writer and doesn't make an idiotic comment more than once or twice a year. He's the reason Tennis magazine still exists, IMHO.

Like all the others, though, Tignor is very soft on the PED issue, which is disappointing. (But it's not easy for him, I'm sure, given how cozy in bed his magazine is with the money behind tennis, who of course would rather not see any mention of PED's in the publication they essentially own.) Not one of the mainstream tennis journalists has properly educated themselves on this issue. So even though they are paying attention to it after the Armstrong disgrace, their comments still read like they are way behind the curve. If the dopers are one or two steps ahead of the testers, they are ten or twelve steps ahead of the writers.
 

JGads

Legend
Bill Simmons of Inside Tennis magazine (a west coast outfit but available online): fantastic writer that you should check out if you haven't already.
 
i would buy a quality tennis magazine if there were a good one, but Tennis is about ten pages long... funny how the uk seems to support about ten thousand obscure, hefty magazines and in america they all seem to go out of business.
 

Don't Let It Bounce

Hall of Fame
Funny that you say that. When I was a kid I remember it was a thick magazine full of good stuff. When I signed up for USTA 20 years later, I got this pamphlet in the mail that turned out to be Tennis magazine. :|
Same here, as a high school kid. When it came in the mail, I'd read it cover to cover that very day. There was no other source of information on all that stuff that fascinated me – some of which still does.

Print magazines are just another archaic story we'll bore our grandchildren with someday. It's good for the trees, I guess.
 

SFrazeur

Legend
tear the entire front and back cover off like I did..... no big deal....


.... this should probably be in "odds and ends" instead of "racquets"
And then tear out 70% of the other pages as well as anying "articles" on fashion. You should have 3 pages and a renewal card left.

-SF
 

Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.
tear the entire front and back cover off like I did..... no big deal....


.... this should probably be in "odds and ends" instead of "racquets"
Just keep the covers; the inside content is trash so you did the right thing! The front cover of the Head Racket is priceless!
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
It's not a big deal to me. If Tennis magazine can stay viable by doing it, more power to them.
 
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