Health Benefits of Drinking in the Afternoon (source: 午後に飲むことの健康上の利点)

What Are the Health Benefits of Drinking in the Afternoon?


  • Total voters
    7
  • Poll closed .

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Just came across an article and would like to know your opinion.
Osamu Dazai responds:


“I drink out of desperation. Life is too dreary to endure. The misery, loneliness, crampedness — they're heartbreaking.[...] What feelings do you suppose a man has when he realizes that he will never know happiness or glory as long as he lives? Hard work. All that amounts to is food for the wild beasts of hunger.”
― Osamu Dazai,
The Setting Sun

“I am convinced that human life is filled with many pure, happy, serene examples of insincerity, truly splendid of their kind-of people deceiving one another without (strangely enough) any wounds being inflicted, of people who seem unaware even that they are deceiving one another.”
― Osamu Dazai, No Longer Human

“I soon came to understand that drink, tobacco and prostitutes were all great means if dissipating (even for a few moments) my dread for human beings. I came even to feel that if I had to sell every last possession to obtain these means of escape, it would be well worth it.”
--
Osamu Dazai




Health Tips:

Alcohol is healthy because it is low in fats.



If you have started your day with a healthy breakfast like vodka and tomato, orange, or other fruit juices, you might want to get some protein for lunch. A White Russian is a healthy option.



Beer is good in the afternoon because it is full of nutrients. Wine is good for the heart and might be a nice way to move through the night.

 
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SoBad

G.O.A.T.
Osamu Dazai responds:


“I drink out of desperation. Life is too dreary to endure. The misery, loneliness, crampedness — they're heartbreaking.[...] What feelings do you suppose a man has when he realizes that he will never know happiness or glory as long as he lives? Hard work. All that amounts to is food for the wild beasts of hunger.”
― Osamu Dazai,
The Setting Sun

“I am convinced that human life is filled with many pure, happy, serene examples of insincerity, truly splendid of their kind-of people deceiving one another without (strangely enough) any wounds being inflicted, of people who seem unaware even that they are deceiving one another.”
― Osamu Dazai, No Longer Human

“I soon came to understand that drink, tobacco and prostitutes were all great means if dissipating (even for a few moments) my dread for human beings. I came even to feel that if I had to sell every last possession to obtain these means of escape, it would be well worth it.”
--
Osamu Dazai




Health Tips:

Alcohol is healthy because it is low in fats.



If you have started your day with a healthy breakfast like vodka and tomato, orange, or other fruit juices, you might want to get some protein for lunch. A White Russian is a healthy option.



Beer is good in the afternoon because it is full of nutrients. Wine is good for the heart and might be a nice way to move through the night.

I really like this Dazai chap, although at times he appears to be stating the obvious. I mean, if you're not spending all your cash on booze, smokes, and hookers, then what are you spending it on? Food and shelter lol...? Family (LMAO)?
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
What percentage of water is water? I’d say less than 50%
The percentage of water is usually around 90-95% in beer and 60% in vodka, so beer and vodka are great substitutes for water. Showering in beer will leave you sticky, so it's best to shower with vodka
 

Sudacafan

G.O.A.T.
The percentage of water is usually around 90-95% in beer and 60% in vodka, so beer and vodka are great substitutes for water. Showering in beer will leave you sticky, so it's best to shower with vodka
Among other qualities, vodka does not show in your breath.
 

Sysyphus

Talk Tennis Guru
Osamu Dazai responds:


“I drink out of desperation. Life is too dreary to endure. The misery, loneliness, crampedness — they're heartbreaking.[...] What feelings do you suppose a man has when he realizes that he will never know happiness or glory as long as he lives? Hard work. All that amounts to is food for the wild beasts of hunger.”
― Osamu Dazai,
The Setting Sun

“I am convinced that human life is filled with many pure, happy, serene examples of insincerity, truly splendid of their kind-of people deceiving one another without (strangely enough) any wounds being inflicted, of people who seem unaware even that they are deceiving one another.”
― Osamu Dazai, No Longer Human

“I soon came to understand that drink, tobacco and prostitutes were all great means if dissipating (even for a few moments) my dread for human beings. I came even to feel that if I had to sell every last possession to obtain these means of escape, it would be well worth it.”
--
Osamu Dazai




Health Tips:

Alcohol is healthy because it is low in fats.



If you have started your day with a healthy breakfast like vodka and tomato, orange, or other fruit juices, you might want to get some protein for lunch. A White Russian is a healthy option.



Beer is good in the afternoon because it is full of nutrients. Wine is good for the heart and might be a nice way to move through the night.

I think Dazai makes some excellent points w/r/t the health-bringing virtues of alcohol and prostitution.

John Williams also writes discerningly of alcohol as a fountain of personal growth:

“They talked late into the night, as if they were old friends. And Stoner came to realize that she was, as she had said, almost happy with her despair; she would live her days out quietly, drinking a little more, year by year, numbing herself against the nothingness her life had become. He was glad that she had that, at least; he was grateful that she could drink.”
― John Williams, Stoner
 
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SoBad

G.O.A.T.
Osamu Dazai responds:


“I drink out of desperation. Life is too dreary to endure. The misery, loneliness, crampedness — they're heartbreaking.[...] What feelings do you suppose a man has when he realizes that he will never know happiness or glory as long as he lives? Hard work. All that amounts to is food for the wild beasts of hunger.”
― Osamu Dazai,
The Setting Sun

“I am convinced that human life is filled with many pure, happy, serene examples of insincerity, truly splendid of their kind-of people deceiving one another without (strangely enough) any wounds being inflicted, of people who seem unaware even that they are deceiving one another.”
― Osamu Dazai, No Longer Human

“I soon came to understand that drink, tobacco and prostitutes were all great means if dissipating (even for a few moments) my dread for human beings. I came even to feel that if I had to sell every last possession to obtain these means of escape, it would be well worth it.”
--
Osamu Dazai




Health Tips:

Alcohol is healthy because it is low in fats.



If you have started your day with a healthy breakfast like vodka and tomato, orange, or other fruit juices, you might want to get some protein for lunch. A White Russian is a healthy option.



Beer is good in the afternoon because it is full of nutrients. Wine is good for the heart and might be a nice way to move through the night.

So much inspiration, thank you! I am going for a White Russian now (vodka, coffee, honey, 1/2-1/2). Should be posting tasting notes in short order.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Is Russia the world’s heaviest-drinking country?
LIFESTYLE
MAY 22 2017
BORIS EGOROV
RBTH

Improved living standards, growing health consciousness and an active campaign by the state has led to reduced per capita alcohol consumption in the country. Residents of some of Russia’s neighbors tend to consumer more alcohol on average than Russians.

There are a number of stereotypes about Russia such as cold climate, harsh manners of Russians, and rampant alcoholism. Russia is widely portrayed as the most alcohol-dependent country in the world.

Critics of the country say that drinking is almost an inherent trait of the Russian people. However, this is an absolute myth.

A land without vodka
It may be hard to believe, but the consumption of alcoholic beverages was absolutely unusual in Russia in ancient times.

Before the adoption of Christianity in Russia (10th century), there was apparently no drunkenness at all. There were no vineyards and therefore no wine. People only drank beverages with low alcohol content such as mead, beer and braga.

Vodka, contrary to popular beliefs, was not a Russian invention. It was brought to Russia by Genovese merchants in the late 14th century. In fact, the drink that was brought to Russia tasted nothing like the vodka that is available in the country now.

The Genovese introduced Russians to ‘aqua vita’ – a pure grape spirit from southern France. Russians didn’t like it, and initially it was used for medicinal purposes.

Imported product
In the 15th century, Russian monasteries started vodka production. The beverage was initially imported along with wine.

There is contradicting information about the inclination of Russian people towards alcohol in the notes of the foreigners from the 15th and 16th centuries.

Austrian Envoy Sigismund von Herberstein wrote in ‘Notes on Muscovy’ (1549), that the Russians “indulge in excessive drinking whenever the occasion arises.”

However, scientist Sebastian Munster in his ‘Cosmography’ (1544) argued that Russians “rarely drink wine, and only then, when satisfied with a generous festive feast.”

Still the heaviest drinkers in medieval Europe were not Russians, but Germans. There were many sayings about their desire to consume alcohol, such as, “drunk as a German.”

The Russian state actually played a role in the spread of alcohol addiction in the country. A monopoly on the sale of alcohol filled the state treasury with huge revenues.

The situation became catastrophic in the 19th century, when the industrial production of vodka began in the country. By 1911, vodka comprised of 89.3 per cent of the total alcohol produced in the country.

Anti-alcohol movement
On the other hand, a powerful and unique anti-alcohol movement started in the Russian Empire in the 19th century. Many public communities were established to prevent the growth of alcoholism in the country. In 1859, many bars and taverns were ravaged and destroyed by anti-alcohol activists.


The struggle against alcoholism continued during the Soviet days. With harsh measures the Soviet authorities closed liquor stores, stopped the functioning of breweries, initiated an anti-alcohol campaign among the population, and restricted the sale of alcohol.

The USSR was not the world's leader in alcohol consumption. At the peak of alcohol consumption in the country in 1984, an average person consumed 8.4 liters of alcohol per year. At that time an average person in Luxembourg consumed 18 liters, while it was 13.5 liters in France and 12.5 liters in Portugal.

Due to the collapse of the Soviet Union, unemployment, rampant crime and difficult living conditions, the consumption of alcohol in Russia reached enormous proportions in the 1990s. This was also the era of the proliferation of substandard, counterfeit alcohol.

In the 2000s, Russia began to actively deal with this problem at the state level.

Russian state intervention in the 2000s
In 2009, the Russian government adopted an anti-alcohol state policy that lasts until 2020. It aims to “reduce the level of alcohol consumption per capita by 55 percent.”

Following the goals and objectives of this policy, Russia has banned the consumption of alcohol in public places, restricted advertising of alcohol products on television and completely banned alcohol advertisements in the printed media.

The country has also limited the sale of alcoholic beverages in the evening and at night and increased fines for selling alcohol to minors. As a deterrent, the government has also increased the rate of excise duties on alcohol.

In May 2017, there was an initiative to ban the demonstration of alcohol in television programs, documentaries and feature films, however, experts say that this is impossible.

State interventions played a more significant role in the reduction of alcohol consumption in Russia than what shows up in official statistics.

Who is the world’s largest per capita alcohol consumer?
According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the heaviest-drinking country in the world in 2016 was not Russia, but tiny Lithuania.

Gauden Galea, Director of the Division of Noncommunicable Diseases and Life-course at WHO/Europe, told the Delfi portal that an average Lithuanian consumed 16 liters of alcohol in 2016.

Belarus is in the second place (15 liters per capita per year) with Latvia in third place (13 liters). Russia and Poland shared fourth place with 12 liters.
2016 was not an exception for Russia in this regard. The country has not been the heaviest-drinking country for many years. In 2013, Russia ranked fifth, in the 2014 – fourth, 2015 – sixth.

Galea noted that Russia and Belarus observed a significant decrease in alcohol consumption. According to Russia's Federal State Statistics Service, consumption of alcohol in Russia has dropped from 18 liters per person in 2009 to 12 liters in 2016.

This marked progress in the fight against alcoholism is associated with many factors including improved living standards, a growing health consciousness and a deliberate policy of the state.

However, alcoholism continues to be a problem in the country. Although Russia does not occupy first place when it comes to consumption of alcoholic beverages per capita, it is still close to the top.

If using any of Russia Beyond's content, partly or in full, always provide an active hyperlink to the original material.
https://www.rbth.com/politics_and_society/2017/05/22/is-russia-the-worlds-heaviest-drinking-country_767914



 

SoBad

G.O.A.T.
WHITE RUSSIAN TASTING NOTES

Better late than never, right? So I poured cold Syrian coffee into a tumbler, added KY vodka and half-and-half. The first impression was -- "wow, this is different". I was immediately in the mood to listen to "Pop Out" on Youtube, and here it is for easy reference (parental discretion advised):
The natural bitterness of the coffee complimented the honey notes and kept the vodka from overwhelming the senses. The cream creates a sense of dessert -- smoother finish.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Or you can just bring your own 1.75L bottle of vodka to Starbucks in a bag. Order a glass of ice, fill it up in the bathroom, and just sit back and watch the suits do their busy thing.
It will draw less attention if you just bring a book.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
I’m a Viking
Only drink blood


This is me, so Ill remove it soon.

I LOVE VAMPIRES!
Considering the price of alcohol in Norway, this is a smart way to get drunk. You need to find people leaving bars late at night.





I've met people in both Norway and Sweden that have said their father or grandfather distills alcohol because it is so expensive, I've never heard of people doing this in Denmark, but I am sure some do this.
 

TheGhostOfAgassi

Talk Tennis Guru
Considering the price of alcohol in Norway, this is a smart way to get drunk. You need to find people leaving bars late at night.





I've met people in both Norway and Sweden that have said their father or grandfather distills alcohol because it is so expensive, I've never heard of people doing this in Denmark, but I am sure some do this.
We are also a rich country and we can afford it ;)
I hope we never become like the Danes... They drink too much!! We are more sporty up in the fjords here.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
The Danes drink the most in Scandinavia, more than the Swedes, and quite much more. Danes drink more than the Fins too. Norwegians drink the less of them all.


The statistics are flawed because everyone in Norway and Sweden illegally distills their own vodka at home. This illegal alcohol consumption is not counted in the official stats. :)

Denmark is an honest and law-abiding country where people pay their alcohol taxes. Also, Danes will tell you that all the drunk people you see in Copenhagen are Swedes who have come over to party.


The Norwegian women I knew really liked to drink. This may have clouded their judgement and explained why they were with me. I partied with a girl and her friends in Oslo who had Coke bottles half-filled with vodka from home. They explained to me that whenever you see a young Norwegian with a Coke, it probably has vodka in it.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru


The statistics are flawed because everyone in Norway and Sweden illegally distills their own vodka at home. This illegal alcohol consumption is not counted in the official stats. :)

Denmark is an honest and law-abiding country where people pay their alcohol taxes. Also, Danes will tell you that all the drunk people you see in Copenhagen are Swedes who have come over to party.


The Norwegian women I knew really liked to drink. This may have clouded their judgement and explained why they were with me. I partied with a girl and her friends in Oslo who had Coke bottles half-filled with vodka from home. They explained to me that whenever you see a young Norwegian with a Coke, it probably has vodka in it.
On my way.

J
 

TheGhostOfAgassi

Talk Tennis Guru


The statistics are flawed because everyone in Norway and Sweden illegally distills their own vodka at home. This illegal alcohol consumption is not counted in the official stats. :)

Denmark is an honest and law-abiding country where people pay their alcohol taxes. Also, Danes will tell you that all the drunk people you see in Copenhagen are Swedes who have come over to party.


The Norwegian women I knew really liked to drink. This may have clouded their judgement and explained why they were with me. I partied with a girl and her friends in Oslo who had Coke bottles half-filled with vodka from home. They explained to me that whenever you see a young Norwegian with a Coke, it probably has vodka in it.
I have never had a distilled home made drink before or been a place people drinking it. You are trolling.
My god I hate internet sometimes.
Of course we like to drink, but not as much as the Danes.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
I have never had a distilled home made drink before or been a place people drinking it. You are trolling.
My god I hate internet sometimes.
Of course we like to drink, but not as much as the Danes.
Calm down, Ghost. Of course I was joking about everyone in Norway distilling vodka at home, and I didn't think anyone would miss my attempt at humour.
 
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Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
We are also a rich country and we can afford it ;)
I hope we never become like the Danes... They drink too much!! We are more sporty up in the fjords here.
Do you have 2.5 times the GDP per capita of Germany and 5 times the GDP per capita of the Czech Republic? If not, as per that graph you are ..... poorer. And by a lot. Same compared to Switzerland, Netherlands, Austria, Belgium. On par with France, Spain and Sweden.

You are in front of ..... Greece, Turkey and Russia.

:cool:
 

TheGhostOfAgassi

Talk Tennis Guru
Do you have 2.5 times the GDP per capita of Germany and 5 times the GDP per capita of the Czech Republic? If not, as per that graph you are ..... poorer. And by a lot. Same compared to Switzerland, Netherlands, Austria, Belgium. On par with France, Spain and Sweden.

You are in front of ..... Greece, Turkey and Russia.

:cool:
Its about average income smartass.

Be still, watch Rafa now. He is gonna kick some butt and win a slam.
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru


The statistics are flawed because everyone in Norway and Sweden illegally distills their own vodka at home. This illegal alcohol consumption is not counted in the official stats. :)

Denmark is an honest and law-abiding country where people pay their alcohol taxes. Also, Danes will tell you that all the drunk people you see in Copenhagen are Swedes who have come over to party.


The Norwegian women I knew really liked to drink. This may have clouded their judgement and explained why they were with me. I partied with a girl and her friends in Oslo who had Coke bottles half-filled with vodka from home. They explained to me that whenever you see a young Norwegian with a Coke, it probably has vodka in it.
In fact, it is much more than that.

Anyone who has seen the ferries that bring Scandinavians in droves to Denmark and Germany and also seen them being carried back to the same ferries on the way home, knows the truth. Same for literally every flight to a tourist destination where the Scandinavians are drunken beyond belief before they even get off the plane (that applies to all: from Business to Economy).

:cool:
 

TheGhostOfAgassi

Talk Tennis Guru
In fact, it is much more than that.

Anyone who has seen the ferries that bring Scandinavians in droves to Denmark and Germany and also seen them being carried back to the same ferries on the way home, knows the truth. Same for literally every flight to a tourist destination where the Scandinavians are drunken beyond belief before they even get off the plane (that applies to all: from Business to Economy).

:cool:
Its not your business what we do here. You are on google all day trying to find faults about others.

I take flights all the time you fantatic negative judgemental man. Ive NEVER seen that before, about have to take the flight back home again because being drunk. When that happens it actually gets on the front newspapers here, its that rare.

Get lost. stop your quarreling and spreading fake news. You are like poison full of venom.

We dont go to Germany, Germans come to Norway to holiday, loads of them coming here. WTF should we do in Germany? NOTHING!
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
Its not your business what we do here.

Ive NEVER seen that before, about have to take the flight back home again because being drunk. When that happens it actually gets on the front newspapers here, its that rare.

We dont go to Germany, Germans come to Norway to holiday, loads of them coming here. WTF should we do in Germany? NOTHING!
Scandinavians regularly do weekend trips to Germany and Denmark on ferries to drink, precisely because the spirits are so outrageously expensive in their own countries. To be fair they go a lot more to Danemark as their overall attitude towards that sort of thing is a lot more relaxed, and it is closer, but they do both.

You also don't read what I wrote. I wrote that they get drunk when flying TO tourist destinations on a plane. They are notorious for that.

Germans go everywhere. They have to be in the top 5 as tourist expenditures per nation. If I remember correctly they spend around 95 bn EUR/year for tourism as a whole (175 bn for USA).

I just found your bragging (for what? a billionth time) about how great Norway is a bit too on the false side. The truth is that Norwegians can't drink, compared to traditional drinking nations and due to problems with alcohol abuse and tax reasons the spirits are so expensive there.

:cool:
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
Norwegians are on the 65th place overall (behind all countries in the graph) in alcohol consumption (2010) and also behind almost all mentioned above nations in spirits consumption as a separate category.

:cool:
 

SoBad

G.O.A.T.
I love drinking on ferries. I remember when I lived in Mid-levels I spent many weekends in Cheung Chau. The breeze, the salty drops from the heart of the ocean, the Chinese beer in my mouth, hanging with the boys, and then the seafood on the little island.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
I love drinking on ferries. I remember when I lived in Mid-levels I spent many weekends in Cheung Chau. The breeze, the salty drops from the heart of the ocean, the Chinese beer in my mouth, hanging with the boys, and then the seafood on the little island.
Northern China has some decent breweries and the Chinese beer is quite cheap in bars. Is the Chinese beer much cheaper than the international brands sold in Hong Kong? Any good?
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Scandinavians regularly do weekend trips to Germany and Denmark on ferries to drink, precisely because the spirits are so outrageously expensive in their own countries. To be fair they go a lot more to Danemark as their overall attitude towards that sort of thing is a lot more relaxed, and it is closer, but they do both.

:cool:
Alcohol is cheaper in Denmark than Sweden, and the attitude towards drinking is much more relaxed. In Sweden you have to go to government Systembolaget for anything stronger than 3.5%. Grocery stores only have weak beers.

Swedes sometimes take ferries to Finland just for the cheap food and alcohol, and bring back alcohol from the duty-free shop. Many don't even get off the ship to look around Turku or Helsinki.


In the summer, Copenhagen's Nyhavn is full of Swedes getting drunk.


There are ferries to Helsingør from Helsingborg full of Swedes coming to Denmark just to load up on alcohol. There are many alcohol shops in Helsingør for the Swedes.

 

SoBad

G.O.A.T.
Northern China has some decent breweries and the Chinese beer is quite cheap in bars. Is the Chinese beer much cheaper than the international brands sold in Hong Kong? Any good?
Yes, Tsingtao is absolutely world-class. As for my selection in Hong Kong, I tended to grab what was readily available / familiar locally, not necessarily the best or the cheapest or the best value. I was a young and stupid recent college grad and had an obscenely generous expat package for my age.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
Yes, Tsingtao is absolutely world-class. As for my selection in Hong Kong, I tended to grab what was readily available / familiar locally, not necessarily the best or the cheapest or the best value. I was a young and stupid recent college grad and had an obscenely generous expat package for my age.
Most of the major Chinese breweries were set up in Harbin and northern China by Europeans around 1900. Tsingtao is pretty good and their major export beer. The most sold beer in China is Snow, which is more watery than Swedish grocery beer, and tastes terrible.


Most of my experience with Chinese beer was in Beijing. I stayed in the apartments for foreign journalists and diplomats (PSB strategy for monitoring) and would often go out at night. The apartment was a short walk to Ritan Park, and the Golden Mango Russian Restaurant was close.

The Mango was stuck in a time warp of nostalgic decrepitude, full of guys from the Russian Embassy and criminals from Eastern Russia, as well as riffraff like me. I don't know what went on up at the balcony tables, but I liked the sleazy bar and cheesy entertainment. The Moscow Restaurant was also interesting.

Most of the bars I went to were on Sanlitun. Harbin beer was a little week and not very good, and Beijing Gold was cheap, a little stronger and not too bad. I usually ordered European beers, Guinness, and vodka drinks.
 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
It is early afternoon in Tokyo and there is a strong scent of alcohol on your breath. You aren't in the mood for disapproving looks from store clerks, and it's too early for the bars. The sun is too bright and the afternoon is only getting hotter, but Tokyo beer vending machines are nearby and the beer is cold.


 

Mike Bulgakov

G.O.A.T.
In the 1990s/early 2000s, I enjoyed the occasional afternoon drinking at Barney's Beanery on Santa Monica Blvd, just off of La Cienega Blvd. I knew one of the bartenders, and she would let me pick the juke box (yes, they had one) songs. There were many varieties of beer on tap, and I would run into the occasional actor like Keifer Sutherland, and some other interesting people.
 
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