healthy diet and daily work out for teenagers?

borna coric

Semi-Pro
son just turned 16 years old last week and daughter just turned 15 a month ago, been playing tennis since they were 8 years old. Take private lesson twice a week and practice 10 hours on weekends. They work out 90 minutes everyday Monday through Friday. Work out routine consists of skiping rope, pushup, hanging on the bar, lunges, sprint and Yoga. They both can run 1 mile in 5 minutes and 20 seconds. Both are home school by "tiger" mom :-(

Breakfast consists of whole grain oats mixed with dried cranberries, sun flower seed, walnut and almond with whole milk; two boiled eggs, half an apple, a banana and a teaspoon of pure honey. In the afternoon, steam chicken with brocoli and cauliflower with a 20oz. glass of milk. In the evening, a bowl of salad, either steak or salmon and a bowl of tomato soup. Also drink 20oz of glass of milk in the evening. No junk food.

Wife thinks that they should be in public school for final year and compete in varsity tennis.

Thoughts?
 
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Deleted member 23235

Guest
son just turned 16 years old last week and daughter just turned 15 a month ago, been playing tennis since they were 8 years old. Take private lesson twice a week and practice 10 hours on weekends. They work out 90 minutes everyday Monday through Friday. Work out routine consists of skiping rope, pushup, hanging on the bar, lunges, sprint and Yoga. They both can run 1 mile in 5 minutes and 20 seconds. Both are home school by "tiger" mom :-(

Breakfast consists of whole grain oats mixed with dried cranberries, sun flower seed, walnut and almond with whole milk; two boiled eggs, half an apple, a banana and a teaspoon of pure honey. In the afternoon, steam chicken with brocoli and cauliflower with a 20oz. glass of milk. In the evening, a bowl of salad, either steak or salmon and a bowl of tomato soup. Also drink 20oz of glass of milk in the evening. No junk food.o

Wife thinks that they should be in public school for final year and compete in varsity tennis.

Thoughts?
great job!

i know one kid that was home schooled, and did exactly what you're proposing (though i think they started in junior year), specifically for the social aspect (of hs) and camaraderie of competing on a team.

realistically, hs tennis did nothing for her game (she was mostly winning 1,1 or better). her tournament results were good enough to get her into a d1 program.

but from a life (and precollege) standpoint, was critical.

good luck!
 

MathGeek

Hall of Fame
Wife thinks that they should be in public school for final year and compete in varsity tennis.

Thoughts?
I'd have a close look at a few things before putting them in public school: quality of academics, school discipline and order, quality of varsity tennis, time management, etc.

In my neighborhood, the quality of most public high school tennis coaching is pretty poor, and the level of play is far lower than in USTA and other non-school affiliated leagues and tournaments.

The public high schools are also a huge time waster: taking up from 7:30 AM to 3:30 PM. By contrast, our students usually complete their home school efforts by 1 PM so they have a lot more time for athletics and other extracurriculars.

The local public schools also have frighteningly low discipline and order. Teachers and admins are overlooking lots of behavior issues: bullying, drugs, sex, porn, cigarettes, etc. The public schools are a great place for teens to pick up bad habits not conducive to success in sports, academics, or life.

Finally, the local public schools are horrible in academics. Ours will likely all qualify for full ride academic scholarships, which would be much less likely in the public high school. Their senior years are dominated with dual enrollment college coursework which provides a high level of academic challenge while gaining socialization and exposure to lots of different teachers, but in a setting that aids the transition to college rather than the herd mentality and folly of high school culture.

It seems like your teens have pretty good diets. It's hard to go wrong avoiding junk food, but that is much harder to impact once you put them in public schools. Be aware that people have varying body chemistries and there may be room to tweak a diet to work better for a given individual. Those diets above are pretty high in fat which many teens will just burn off, but it may give rise to acne or body fat gains in others.

For workouts, I would identify strengths and weaknesses. My son has fairly good cardio and mobility compared with most teen tennis players, so his coach has him working on his upper body strength, which is his area of comparable weaknesses. But many of his opponents would definitely benefit from improved cardio and endurance. My son's vertical leap is pretty poor compared with most teens. But your teens' strengths and weaknesses might be completely different.
 

borna coric

Semi-Pro
The local public schools also have frighteningly low discipline and order. Teachers and admins are overlooking lots of behavior issues: bullying, drugs, sex, porn, cigarettes, etc. The public schools are a great place for teens to pick up bad habits not conducive to success in sports, academics, or life.

Finally, the local public schools are horrible in academics. Ours will likely all qualify for full ride academic scholarships, which would be much less likely in the public high school. Their senior years are dominated with dual enrollment college coursework which provides a high level of academic challenge while gaining socialization and exposure to lots of different teachers, but in a setting that aids the transition to college rather than the herd mentality and folly of high school culture.
thank you so much for the advice.

Those diets above are pretty high in fat which many teens will just burn off, but it may give rise to acne or body fat gains in others.
don't they need lot of fat and milk to help with growing muscle and height? I would think that with 17.5 hours of intense working out and tennis a week, those diets are reasonable, right?

Thank you again.
 

MathGeek

Hall of Fame
thank you so much for the advice.

don't they need lot of fat and milk to help with growing muscle and height? I would think that with 17.5 hours of intense working out and tennis a week, those diets are reasonable, right?

Thank you again.
Your "a lot" may be different from my " a lot." The thing we did with our teens is keep an eye on their BMI to make sure they were in a healthy range. The CDC has a calculator for teens and parents:

https://nccd.cdc.gov/dnpabmi/calculator.aspx

I see plenty of local teen players who are fit and healthy. But I also see plenty whose total calorie intake is much higher than they are burning off leading to lots of excess body fat.
 

borna coric

Semi-Pro
Your "a lot" may be different from my " a lot." The thing we did with our teens is keep an eye on their BMI to make sure they were in a healthy range. The CDC has a calculator for teens and parents: https://nccd.cdc.gov/dnpabmi/calculator.aspx
Thank you for the link. My son is 5'9 in height and weigh at 145lbs so, according to the BMI, he is in the healthy weigh. Same goes for daughter, 5'3 in height and 115lbs.

His goal is when he takes of his shirt, he wants to look like Borna Coric :)

have a great day.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
@MathGeek @borna coric

Note that BMI can't distinguish between fat and muscle. For this reason, BMI is not a good indicator of health for some/many athletes. Body fat percentages might be a better indicator of health. But even this is not a perfect measurement since some types of body fat are less healthy than others.

http://healthland.time.com/2013/08/26/why-bmi-isnt-the-best-measure-for-weight-or-health/

Note that the whole milk might be ok but keep in mind that milk from cows is not exactly ideal for humans. Cow's milk is high in casein protein and relatively low in whey protein. Human breast milk OTOH is very high in whey protein and relatively low in casein protein. You might want to add some whey protein powder to the milk or add whey protein sources to their diet. Ricotta cheese is one excellent source of whey protein. Some yogurts and cheeses Might have some (moderate) levels of whey protein.

Not sure if the milk sugars in human milk differs significantly from cow's milk. They both contain lactose (along with lesser amounts of other sugars). After early childhood, not everyone can easily digest lactose. If your kids have been drinking a lot of milk with any intolerance issues, they may be ok with the lactose. Yogurt, I believe, is relatively low in lactose and is tolerate better by some individuals.

Probably best to avoid milk that have been produced with hormones. Look for milk that does not contain rBST (or rBGH).

Human breast milk also contain DHA (an omega-3 fatty acid). Some cow's milk have DHA (check the label) but most, if not explicitly stated, do not. Either buy milk with DHA or have your kids get their omega 3 fatty acids from other sources. Salmon and sardines are excellent sources of DHA and other omega-3 fatty acids. Avoid tilipia fish. It has an undesirable fatty acid profile.

http://americanpregnancy.org/first-year-of-life/whats-in-breastmilk/
 
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borna coric

Semi-Pro
@MathGeek @borna coric
Note that the whole milk might be ok but keep in mind that milk from cows is not exactly ideal for humans. Cow's milk is high in casein protein and relatively low in whey protein. Human breast milk OTOH is very high in whey protein and relatively low in casein protein. You might want to add some whey protein powder to the milk or add whey protein sources to their diet. Ricotta cheese is one excellent source of whey protein. Some yogurts and cheeses Might have some (moderate) levels of whey protein.

Not sure if the milk sugars in human milk differs significantly from cow's milk. They both contain lactose (along with lesser amounts of other sugars). After early childhood, not everyone can easily digest lactose. If your kids have been drinking a lot of milk with any intolerance issues, they may be ok with the lactose. Yogurt, I believe, is relatively low in lactose and is tolerate better by some individuals.

Probably best to avoid milk that have been produced with hormones. Look for milk that does not contain rBST (or rBGH).

Human breast milk also contain DHA (an omega-3 fatty acid). Some cow's milk have DHA (check the label) but most, if not explicitly stated, do not. Either buy milk with DHA or have your kids get their omega 3 fatty acids from other sources. Salmon and sardines are excellent sources of DHA and other omega-3 fatty acids. Avoid tilipia fish. It has an undesirable fatty acid profile.

http://americanpregnancy.org/first-year-of-life/whats-in-breastmilk/
Thank you very much for the information. my kids drink this milk brand below so based on what you described, it is ok, right:



thanks again
 

SoaD

New User
they have maniacally obsessive parents; will be seeing psychotherapists eventually
Lol I was thinking the same thing. Their lifestyle is more controlled than kids at tennis academies.

I'm confused as to how these kids train so much but are still considering a high school varsity level? Their skills should be far more developed than a typical high school tennis player.

I think you should enroll your kids in high school, but not because of tennis. They need proper social skills and high school is an experience that everyone should get. Every home schooled person that I have met is an odd duck.
 

Bluefan75

Professional
I remember reading a college basketball book years ago, and the coach was talking about training table, pregame meal, etc. He said, "Doesn't do anything. They play their best basketball in the summer, and all they eat then is McDonald's." They're teenagers for pete's sake. The extra benefit they get from all this is not worth the fact they will not have any fun.
 

MisterP

Hall of Fame
This is just a PSA. BEWARE anyone who mentions #paleo or #crossfit. Both fads are popular among health "fanatics" but the vast majority of actual athletes don't ascribe to one approach, as that's a great way to get burnt out and injured. Steer clear of em.
 
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