Heat Illness

Ash Doyle

Professional
Does anyone have a history of any type of heat illness? Does it still affect you any?

Last June, I suffered a heat stroke and had to be taken to the hospital from the tennis courts. I've never been one that could deal with heat too easily, but since then I feel as if my tolerance has dropped even lower. Last night, I was playing and got overheated to the point that I began vomitting. It was hot, and it was a hard playing match but I didn't think it was to the point of warranting the reaction I had.

Anybody else have similar problems? How are you dealing with it?
What is a good way to build up endurance and heat tolerance?
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
Don't play with fire, so to speak. Sustained hyperthermia can damage your BRAIN and other of your favorite organs. Laws of thermodynamics will not be denied, so you have to learn from the past and not play when it is too hot or humid. I use those days to take the hopper out and hit lots of serves, rather than run around on the court.
________
California dispensaries
 
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NoBadMojo

G.O.A.T.
Ash Doyle said:
Does anyone have a history of any type of heat illness? Does it still affect you any?

Last June, I suffered a heat stroke and had to be taken to the hospital from the tennis courts. I've never been one that could deal with heat too easily, but since then I feel as if my tolerance has dropped even lower. Last night, I was playing and got overheated to the point that I began vomitting. It was hot, and it was a hard playing match but I didn't think it was to the point of warranting the reaction I had.

Anybody else have similar problems? How are you dealing with it?
What is a good way to build up endurance and heat tolerance?

Ash I assume you come to the court well hydrated, and I mean well hydrated from the day before and the day before that? Some bodies deal better with heat and sun than others. Also in the sun always wear a lightweight hat. cold towel on the neck helps during changeovers. Also, dont know your playing style and how much energy you are putting into each ball. Cytomax is a great thing to drink out there along with water and may give you noticeably more endurance as well as helping you recover more quickly
If you like, for the training and endurance aspect, go to pisanitraining.com and check that out. paul offers online, phone training and will custom make for you a program based upon your needs. Paul is a ATP/WTA trainer and trained Ginperi when he made his big run last year..he may have something which is specifically useful for you.
Do you ever cramp either during or after? If you detect that you've stopped producing sweat and get a chill, that's a good time to walk off the court
 

vkartikv

Hall of Fame
NoBadMojo said:
Ash I assume you come to the court well hydrated, and I mean well hydrated from the day before and the day before that? Some bodies deal better with heat and sun than others. Also in the sun always wear a lightweight hat. cold towel on the neck helps during changeovers. Also, dont know your playing style and how much energy you are putting into each ball. Cytomax is a great thing to drink out there along with water and may give you noticeably more endurance as well as helping you recover more quickly
If you like, for the training and endurance aspect, go to pisanitraining.com and check that out. paul offers online, phone training and will custom make for you a program based upon your needs. Paul is a ATP/WTA trainer and trained Ginperi when he made his big run last year..he may have something which is specifically useful for you.

Sorry for being ignorant about this but what is cytomax? Is it available at all supermarkets?
 

slewisoh

Semi-Pro
Unless you are really out of shape or playing tennis under very difficult conditions, I would think that your body would be better able to regulate it's core temperature. Have you discussed this with your doctor? I'm not sure which gland controls temperature regulation (pituitary, thyroid?) but it's possible that part of your endocrine system is not working properly.

Or as others have stated it might be as simple as hydrating properly.
 
Thermoregulation primarily dictated by the central nervous system (signals for peripheral vasodilation, perspiration, etc.) and thyroid axis. The guy lives in a hot humid climate (North Carolina); unlikely to have CNS or thyroid dysfunction as the cause of this problem without plenty of other indicative signs and symptoms. There isn't a silver bullet to treat every situation; sometimes you just have to go a little easier.
 

Ash Doyle

Professional
Thanks for the recommendations guys. NoBadMojo, I'll definetly check out that site and the Cytomax. As I said earlier, before last year I was able to deal with the heat much better than I do now. During June, I had my heat stroke; and in July I came down with Mono (something I have never heard of someone my age contracting, but it was the worst illness I have ever had). Since then, I just don't feel like I've ever fully recovered.
 

NoBadMojo

G.O.A.T.
Ash Doyle said:
Thanks for the recommendations guys. NoBadMojo, I'll definetly check out that site and the Cytomax. As I said earlier, before last year I was able to deal with the heat much better than I do now. During June, I had my heat stroke; and in July I came down with Mono (something I have never heard of someone my age contracting, but it was the worst illness I have ever had). Since then, I just don't feel like I've ever fully recovered.

Your system and blood chemistry was likely pretty whacked w. the heat stroke and the mono, and that may take a while before you get your mojo completely back. I assume the doctor looked you over well when you went in. take it easy and hope all gets better
 
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