Help me decide if this Wilson Baiardo is worth it?

Dan007

Hall of Fame
Hi, TW stringing gurus.

I recently came across a 3 year old Wilson Baiardo that was used in a retail/shop environment. The machine has a total of 219,063 pulls which I'm not sure how many rackets that equates to. The asking price is $2495 but definitely trying to negotiate and shave some $$ off if I decide to buy. Do you think a machine of this age with this amount of pulls is worth this much? The machine seemed well taken care of.

Thanks.
 

Dan007

Hall of Fame
Thank you! That quite a lot of frames strung on that machine. I know high-end professional machines like the Baiardo can last for years with high mileage. Still not sure if this is a good buy or If I am better off paying a bit more for a new Ghost 2
 

SavvyStringer

Professional
I think it’s personal preference. Do you want a new machine or do you want what is arguably the best machine on the market? I have a Baiardo and an original ghost. I’d have to check the Baiardo to see what my pull count is but I know I’ve done at least 1,000 probably closer to 1,200 since I got it last year. It’s a great machine and I’ve moved it multiple times to go to tournaments and when I moved and have never had a problem with calibration. I also have a ghost which doesn’t do pull count but having used it for 3 college seasons I know I did 3600 probably closer to 4K by the time you count personal and rec player rackets, maybe more with tournaments. Again, never had a problem with it, moving it around, using it on a stand and table top. Both machines are effective but unless the Baiardo has noticeable defects I would go with it.
 

Dan007

Hall of Fame
Thanks! Always nice to hear an experienced stringer's advice. What do you think about babolat star 5 with 1634 rackets strung for about $1800? I am worried about the lack of parts. I heard the machine was professionally refurbished and exceptionally well taken care of but still you never know when something can break, especially with a machine as old as the star 5.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
The one obvious concern with the Star 5, as you point out, is lack of support and parts. But if it’s really been well taken care of, that may be moot for quite a while. Impossible to know for sure. OTOH the Baiardo is still supported and parts are available, but the machine in question has a lot more use. Tough call. If it were me, I’d lean Baiardo.
 

cluckcluck

Hall of Fame
I think it’s personal preference. Do you want a new machine or do you want what is arguably the best machine on the market? I have a Baiardo and an original ghost. I’d have to check the Baiardo to see what my pull count is but I know I’ve done at least 1,000 probably closer to 1,200 since I got it last year. It’s a great machine and I’ve moved it multiple times to go to tournaments and when I moved and have never had a problem with calibration. I also have a ghost which doesn’t do pull count but having used it for 3 college seasons I know I did 3600 probably closer to 4K by the time you count personal and rec player rackets, maybe more with tournaments. Again, never had a problem with it, moving it around, using it on a stand and table top. Both machines are effective but unless the Baiardo has noticeable defects I would go with it.
This is incorrect. If you hold down the knot button it will give you the pull count, except it will give you the first 3 number and press it again for the last 3 numbers (000,000).
 

SavvyStringer

Professional
Thanks! Always nice to hear an experienced stringer's advice. What do you think about babolat star 5 with 1634 rackets strung for about $1800? I am worried about the lack of parts. I heard the machine was professionally refurbished and exceptionally well taken care of but still you never know when something can break, especially with a machine as old as the star 5.
That's a nice machine but a bit over priced IMO. The University's Star 5 has like 5,600 rackets on it and wasn't always treated the best and it still works fine.
 

SavvyStringer

Professional
Hi, TW stringing gurus.

I recently came across a 3 year old Wilson Baiardo that was used in a retail/shop environment. The machine has a total of 219,063 pulls which I'm not sure how many rackets that equates to. The asking price is $2495 but definitely trying to negotiate and shave some $$ off if I decide to buy. Do you think a machine of this age with this amount of pulls is worth this much? The machine seemed well taken care of.

Thanks.
Checked my Baiardo. 63,656 total pulls based on my math that’s 1,720 rackets. I split the difference or 16x19 and 18x20 and call it 37 pulls per frame. It’s probably more like 40 per based on the way I pull knot tension.
 

Dan007

Hall of Fame
Checked my Baiardo. 63,656 total pulls based on my math that’s 1,720 rackets. I split the difference or 16x19 and 18x20 and call it 37 pulls per frame. It’s probably more like 40 per based on the way I pull knot tension.
Got it Thanks! How many years/frames can a high-end machine such as a baiardo last? The 6,000+ number still seems too high and just worried I might have to spend more $ not too long after getting it because a part needs to be replaced.
 

SavvyStringer

Professional
Got it Thanks! How many years/frames can a high-end machine such as a baiardo last? The 6,000+ number still seems too high and just worried I might have to spend more $ not too long after getting it because a part needs to be replaced.
I would say at least 10k pretty easily but it all depends on usage, care, and luck. I checked with a couple of my friends and one has about 5700 rackets and the other about 3500. The one with 5700 said that based on the number of frames across it he wouldn’t pay more than $1500 for it. For reference his son has a star 5 that has 12k on it.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
There is a new Baiardo on FB Marketplace for $4250 after the BBT if it hasn't been sold yet. It may have a few hundred rackets on it when done.
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
^^^yep—at least one. I thought Chuck may have two for sale when it’s over. Last year, he had committed buyers before the end of the tournament.
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
It's very, very unlikely you'll get a super high end machine for $1500 or less. I know Irvin got lucky but I'm not talking about getting lucky. I'm talking realistically. If you do, there is likely something needing replaced or the parts are unavailable. Neos 1000 machines that are nearing 40 years old can still go for close to $900 and were likely purchased new for less. I'd spend a little more and get the Ghost 2 but it's not my money.

If you're going to use it to make money as income, go big and buy the $4250 one.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
It's very, very unlikely you'll get a super high end machine for $1500 or less. I know Irvin got lucky but I'm not talking about getting lucky. I'm talking realistically. If you do, there is likely something needing replaced or the parts are unavailable. Neos 1000 machines that are nearing 40 years old can still go for close to $900 and were likely purchased new for less. I'd spend a little more and get the Ghost 2 but it's not my money.

If you're going to use it to make money as income, go big and buy the $4250 one.
There is a chain of pro shops here in the Atlanta area that just replaced all their Star 5 machines with Baiardo machines. My guess is you could pick up one of the Star 5s for under $1.5K. But if I were in the market for a new machine I would go with a new / gently used machine. I think the Star 5s resale price isn’t going to do anything but drop, I would not pay over $1K for one and then only if it was in excellent shape. Too big of an investment on an unsupported machine that has seen its better days.
 

SavvyStringer

Professional
Keep in mind that all of this is volume dependent as well. Sure you string but how many are you really doing a month/year? Is your client base actually pretty solid and reliable or is it cyclical/ feast or famine? Even stringing for a university it’s cyclical for me. August to December 1 it’s full blast, January 1-mid May it’s full blast. Maybe 10-15 rackets a month during December, June, and July. It all depends on how many of our players are local, in summer school, or passing through on the way to tourneys. For recreational players it’s very much the same way. I’ll have a week where I do 10, then 3 weeks where I do 5 total. Basically how reliable is your income from stringing? How long will it take you to recoup the money? Do you actually enjoy stringing enough to spend big money on a machine? I know the machine will be a sunk cost once purchased but how many labors will you do for ‘free’ before the machine is paid for? How many before it’s worth it to pay 3-4K for a machine? Many of the electronic machines will last for years and years especially with light use (<500 a year) but what about buying a $700-1000 crank making your money back, adding a wise if your interest is still there, and upgrading the future? Plenty of people think they have the volume and passion to justify a pro caliber machine but really few do. I can say from personal experience that I normally go through cycles during the year (typically about mid March) where I’m burnt out on not having evenings or weekends because of stringing but I keep plowing through because the money’s good and I know I’ll eventually enjoy it again. I don’t think you can do large volume for increased periods of time if you don’t actually like stringing. Why are you trying to purchase your own or another machine if you’re already stringing rackets? Taking clients from an established business could cost you in other ways.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
^^I hear what you’re saying. I might do about 500 rackets a year anymore. I had not had a racket to string for a week then 9 came in just the other morning. It always goes in cycles like that for me. Seems like most players want to string their racket(s) just before the start of a season (ALTA, USTA, T2, etc...) then once the season starts they don’t want to change anything unless a string breaks. For me that is about a solid week of being bent over a machine stringing every year. I think it makes sense to me to best and most ergonomic machine you can get at that point. Just saving a couple minutes a racket makes a big difference over time.
 

Bsaikit

New User
Hello,

I have an opportunity to buy a second hand Baiardo of approx 4 yrs old with ~4,000 racquets done on it. It used to be a tennis shop machine. I like the idea of the ergonomics of machine and like to think it’ll ease back stress over the long haul.

I string more as a hobby and the income essentially pays for all my tennis needs. I’d say I string about 120-140 racquets annually.

Is AUD5000 (USD3450) worth considering?

Thanks
b


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Tennis_dude101

Semi-Pro
Hello,

I have an opportunity to buy a second hand Baiardo of approx 4 yrs old with ~4,000 racquets done on it. It used to be a tennis shop machine. I like the idea of the ergonomics of machine and like to think it’ll ease back stress over the long haul.

I string more as a hobby and the income essentially pays for all my tennis needs. I’d say I string about 120-140 racquets annually.

Is AUD5000 (USD3450) worth considering?

Thanks
b


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Based on your stringing rate its going to take about 2 years for you to pay it off if your making $20 profit per racquet. If your happy with those figures and have the room for it then its all systems go!

BIW
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Hi, TW stringing gurus.

I recently came across a 3 year old Wilson Baiardo that was used in a retail/shop environment. The machine has a total of 219,063 pulls which I'm not sure how many rackets that equates to. The asking price is $2495 but definitely trying to negotiate and shave some $$ off if I decide to buy. Do you think a machine of this age with this amount of pulls is worth this much? The machine seemed well taken care of.

Thanks.
Just to muddy the water, you can get a new Baiardo L for $3499 + free shipping direct from Wilson. That's what I'd do. If you don't have the money right now, save and wait until you do.
 

SavvyStringer

Professional
Hello,

I have an opportunity to buy a second hand Baiardo of approx 4 yrs old with ~4,000 racquets done on it. It used to be a tennis shop machine. I like the idea of the ergonomics of machine and like to think it’ll ease back stress over the long haul.

I string more as a hobby and the income essentially pays for all my tennis needs. I’d say I string about 120-140 racquets annually.

Is AUD5000 (USD3450) worth considering?

Thanks
b


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
It's worth considering if you plan to grow and string more. If your numbers are going to remain stable where they're at you're not really doing enough volume to take much toll on your body anyway. Your average year is about a month for me. Having used a ghost for the same sort of volume, I can attest that I do better physically with the more ergonomic Baiardo but the time period is vastly different.
 

Bsaikit

New User
Actually yeah that’s good food for thought. I’d say the most I string in any one day would be 5 or 6 racquets and by the time I’m on my 4th/5th shaped poly it’s more my fingers that are sore more than from standing and arching the back. Thanks for the input.

Is 4000 racquets over 4 years considered high mileage?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Is 4000 racquets over 4 years considered high mileage?

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Not at all. A friend of mine owns a pro shop here in town. He uses Prince NEOS 1000's. He told me he two of his machines probably have 20,000+ rackets each on them.
 

SavvyStringer

Professional
Actually yeah that’s good food for thought. I’d say the most I string in any one day would be 5 or 6 racquets and by the time I’m on my 4th/5th shaped poly it’s more my fingers that are sore more than from standing and arching the back. Thanks for the input.

Is 4000 racquets over 4 years considered high mileage?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Nope, not even close. That's approximately 2.75 rackets a day. Which is less than 20 a week. Realistically with the cyclical nature of tennis and it being a proshop machine it likely wasn't actually used everyday. It was probably 2-3 days a week that did majority of the work. One thing to consider is that the hardest thing on the small circuits in the machines is turning them on. I recommend purchasing the machine, turning it on, and barring extreme weather (storms that may effect power) or vacation (gone a week or more) just leave it on. I actually picked that up from a Wilson stringer. He told me that he quit turning his off. Not only because it was an everyday occurrence but because that is the hardest part for the machine going from cold to hot with power flow. I haven't noticed any change in my power bill since starting to leave it on. Now it only gets turned off for storms and during school breaks where I won't be stringing much.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
One thing to consider is that the hardest thing on the small circuits in the machines is turning them on. I recommend purchasing the machine, turning it on, and barring extreme weather (storms that may effect power) or vacation (gone a week or more) just leave it on. I actually picked that up from a Wilson stringer. He told me that he quit turning his off. Not only because it was an everyday occurrence but because that is the hardest part for the machine going from cold to hot with power flow. I haven't noticed any change in my power bill since starting to leave it on. Now it only gets turned off for storms and during school breaks where I won't be stringing much.
Now that is interesting. I have heard it both ways, turn it off....leave it on. I know the Mighty Sensor has an uptime counter. Mine is on a surge protector, but currently I turn it off. @Babolat Official @abllee2198 @Herb @Richard Parnell @RJYU what do you guys think? This may have been better as a separate thread, please excuse the hijack.
 
Top