High Forehand Volley Eastern Grip

I have tried in vain to hit high floaty forehand volleys with a continental grip and am ready to experiment with an eastern grip. As is, my volleys float long with no power or I bury theM In the next. Anyone had success with volleying these balls with an eastern grip? Any tips?
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Most good players use pure conti, locked wrist, full arm swing from the shoulder, semi closed stance, and forward body movement.
Some, like Rafter, Cash, Sampras, and maybe Edberg-Becker, use a grip of continental with a half twist towards eastern forehand, for more locked wrist, less slapping conti motion, and more control.
Just practice it a lot, and it will come.
Problem comes when opponent get's to your high forehand and hit's a low passing shot near you, which grip are you gonna use now?
 
I use a grip between continental and eastern forehand on forehand volleys. It probably gets shifted more toward eastern on high balls and more toward continental on low balls without me consciously trying to shift it.
 
Thanks, topspin. Why is it that the continental grip works better, at least for me, on low volleys? What does the eastern grip offer to the high forehand volley?
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Conti opens the face for low and half volleys.
For high volleys, it's easier to hit with slight twist towards eForehand, from a conti grip, but the problem occurs when the opponent hit's a low passing shot at you, forcing you to decide again what grip to use at a moment's notice.
 

sundaypunch

Hall of Fame
Many coaches advocate conti for volleys but shifting slightly toward eastern on both sides when you have time. It does help with high volleys.
 
Many coaches advocate conti for volleys but shifting slightly toward eastern on both sides when you have time. It does help with high volleys.
I agree. start with a Conti and if you have time turn the grip a Little (on high volleys you have time because a high ball hit hard will sail Long:)).
 

boramiNYC

Hall of Fame
Shouldn't have to turn away from conti grip for all heights. You can turn more sideway for high balls for fh volleys. That way you can instantly decide whether to volley or smash for a floating ball. Keep the volley grip simple at conti and learn correct footwork for different instances.
 
Thanks, topspin. Why is it that the continental grip works better, at least for me, on low volleys? What does the eastern grip offer to the high forehand volley?
The continental grip opens the face, which makes it easier to get the low volleys over the net with some backspin. The eastern grip helps you stay on top of the high volleys so they don't sail.

Shouldn't have to turn away from conti grip for all heights. You can turn more sideway for high balls for fh volleys. That way you can instantly decide whether to volley or smash for a floating ball. Keep the volley grip simple at conti and learn correct footwork for different instances.
It depends on the player. Some great volleyers do it the way you're saying, and others use a more eastern grip.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
There is no ONE way to volley well.
Sampras, Becker, Edberg, Cash, Rafter all used a slight twist towards eastern forehand for all volleys, including backhand volleys.
But do we know any great volleyers who used conti with a slight twist towards eBACKhand for ALL their volleys?
 

comeback

Hall of Fame
I have tried in vain to hit high floaty forehand volleys with a continental grip and am ready to experiment with an eastern grip. As is, my volleys float long with no power or I bury theM In the next. Anyone had success with volleying these balls with an eastern grip? Any tips?
Addressing the HIGH forehand volley: the advice you recieved is good for all the low to waist high vollyes..But the High forehand volley is sometimes difficult if you don't have a strong forehand snap or stiffarm to put them away..many players now let the ball drop more and hit the swinging volley which uses more shoulder; especially good for some older or female players.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
Usually, high forehand and backhand volleys are off SLOW incoming balls, compared to low passing shots.
On a slower incoming ball, you have time to take a mini swing at it, or, you should let it go long if it's somewhat fast.
Don't volley a fast incoming ball if it's higher than nose heights, because that usually goes long.
If you only volley incoming balls nose and lower, you won't have to worry much about high volleys.
And when you get a sitter over your eyes, just swing at it with a short violent swing.
 

boramiNYC

Hall of Fame
It seems every single tennis player on earth hits every shot differently. Then what's the point of teaching or learning tennis or even asking and giving tips?

Sweetheart, we all do it our own special way you're doing just fine.

Sure.

LeeD any source they all used between conti and E fh grip for both fh and bh volleys? Haven't heard that before.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
If you mean written source, nobody would ever write about it.
Look at the length of swing between forehand and backhand volleys.
Look at the contact point of each volley for the same player.
Guys who use conti with eForehand twist take the forehand volley really early, use a short punch, and take the backhand volley really late with a long swing.
Guys like Vitus who used more conti took mostly even length swings on either side with their volleys, with some favor towards longer swing on backhand volleys.
But most important, YOU go out and hit a ton of volleys with each grip. You can feel the need to change contact point and length of swing with each different grip.
 

oble

Hall of Fame
I just stick to the same conti grip for everything up at the net.. Any adjustment is probably subconscious and very subtle -- there's no time to think about grip change up at the net!
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
I think it's easier to be solid around the net when we have one default grip position to use under fire. A high floater can be easier for a net player to thump with a little bit of an eastern forehand sort of "frying pan" move on the ball, but that grip won't help so much when the incoming ball is ripped anywhere else, especially at the backhand side and there's no time for a grip change.

I teach/coach a lot of kids who like to hit strokes with a bit of an open stance whenever they can and working on volleys with these sluggers can run counter to those open stance instincts. Those modern-ish strokes demand going out after the ball to a contact point that's more in front of the hitter toward the net, but the best strike zone for a sharp volley is typically further back beside the hitter.

Pushing the racquet through the ball can sort of work when the ball is perhaps below chest height, but that "push volley" is a compromise that gets really weak as the ball gets higher up. Instead of the volleyer's stance remaining too open for higher balls, it's important to get the feet more neutral or even a little bit closed.

The action needed with the arm and racquet for stronger volleys is a compact left-to-right or right-to-left movement in front of the hitter's chest ("in front" doesn't necessarily mean ahead of the hitter toward the net) combined with a forward weight transfer. I like to call that transfer a sort of side-step through contact and in general, I like the image of a volley being a mini slice.

The energy in a slice is greatly diminished if the hitter's feet are set too open and the shoulders don't turn sideways far enough to draw the racquet forward through the ball. The volley is similar. Higher volleys can float and really lose their zip without decent orientation (turn sideways) and strong footwork (side-step) to drive them. Instead of pushing the racquet through the ball, think of getting the racquet out beside you so that you can drag it with your body's inertia.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
I just stick to the same conti grip for everything up at the net.. Any adjustment is probably subconscious and very subtle -- there's no time to think about grip change up at the net!
Me too. No grip change. Though I do that on the baseline too!
 
Top