Hip replacement?

#1
I know this topic has come up before but I'm hoping to get some more insight from others that have gone through this surgery. I'm scheduled for a left THR in 2 weeks.

I have to admit that the thought of having these artificial parts installed in me is causing more than a little anxiety. I think the real concerns for me are some of the unknown factors. For example, how long before I can get back on the courts, what will my mobility be like and will I ever be able to play singles again without having to worry about a dislocation.

I can put up with the temporary recovery time and pain and I'm told that the first 6 weeks are critical. So in preparation, I've been hitting the gym workouts harder trying to build strength especially in the weak leg. Weight loss would be nice but that is tough to accomplish with one good leg.

The medical profession always seems to be conservative when asked about tennis after THR. Many times they officially do not recommend singles tennis for example. But for someone who has been playing singles for over 40 years, that advice is very worrisome. So, if there is anyone out there with a "happy ending" story, I'm all ears.
 
#2
Singles would be foolish. Wife's uncle was an avid tennis player, had THR, went back to singles, the whole bone structure cracked on him, no more tennis. Doubles at best.
 
#3
I know this topic has come up before but I'm hoping to get some more insight from others that have gone through this surgery. I'm scheduled for a left THR in 2 weeks.

I have to admit that the thought of having these artificial parts installed in me is causing more than a little anxiety. I think the real concerns for me are some of the unknown factors. For example, how long before I can get back on the courts, what will my mobility be like and will I ever be able to play singles again without having to worry about a dislocation.

I can put up with the temporary recovery time and pain and I'm told that the first 6 weeks are critical. So in preparation, I've been hitting the gym workouts harder trying to build strength especially in the weak leg. Weight loss would be nice but that is tough to accomplish with one good leg.

The medical profession always seems to be conservative when asked about tennis after THR. Many times they officially do not recommend singles tennis for example. But for someone who has been playing singles for over 40 years, that advice is very worrisome. So, if there is anyone out there with a "happy ending" story, I'm all ears.

I know this topic has come up before but I'm hoping to get some more insight from others that have gone through this surgery. I'm scheduled for a left THR in 2 weeks.

I have to admit that the thought of having these artificial parts installed in me is causing more than a little anxiety. I think the real concerns for me are some of the unknown factors. For example, how long before I can get back on the courts, what will my mobility be like and will I ever be able to play singles again without having to worry about a dislocation.

I can put up with the temporary recovery time and pain and I'm told that the first 6 weeks are critical. So in preparation, I've been hitting the gym workouts harder trying to build strength especially in the weak leg. Weight loss would be nice but that is tough to accomplish with one good leg.

The medical profession always seems to be conservative when asked about tennis after THR. Many times they officially do not recommend singles tennis for example. But for someone who has been playing singles for over 40 years, that advice is very worrisome. So, if there is anyone out there with a "happy ending" story, I'm all ears.
Felt compelled to update this. Had my left total hip replacement 2 years ago. I'm a 70 year old that is a regular at the gym, runs on the treadmill and plays 4.0 doubles and singles. If anyone needs a THR and thinks their tennis days will be over, think again. Find a good surgeon, keep up your leg strength and you can get get back on the courts pain free.
 
#4
My father had a THR many years ago. Played mostly doubles after that since the THR robbed him of most of his speed. He's 76 and about 10 yeras out and the hip is holding up fine.

When you need it, you get it done. But I'd recommend most humans play as much tennis on natural surfaces both before and after their hip gives out on them. And doubles is probably the best idea after 70, before you need a TKR as well.
 

norcal

Hall of Fame
#5
Felt compelled to update this. Had my left total hip replacement 2 years ago. I'm a 70 year old that is a regular at the gym, runs on the treadmill and plays 4.0 doubles and singles. If anyone needs a THR and thinks their tennis days will be over, think again. Find a good surgeon, keep up your leg strength and you can get get back on the courts pain free.
I was about to answer your OP, thinking it was new! Glad to hear you are doing well and playing lots of tennis!

My response was going to be: my friend had both hips replaced and plays both singles and doubles just fine - not as fast as he used to be, but who is? Another friend just had his right hip replaced (7 mos ago-ish) and is back on the basketball court. Stay in shape before and after recovery and you should be good to go!

You are 70 years old, who cares if you wear out your new hip in 15 years!
 
#6
Apparently hip replacements have gotten way better lately.

I have one friend who got both replaced in the same year, and was back on the courts surprisingly quickly. I don't think he plays singles, but then again I've only known him to play doubles.

My FIL recently got one replaced, and felt good enough to walk to the dinner table and socialize that very evening.
 

Mongolmike

Hall of Fame
#7
Apparently hip replacements have gotten way better lately.

I have one friend who got both replaced in the same year, and was back on the courts surprisingly quickly. I don't think he plays singles, but then again I've only known him to play doubles.

My FIL recently got one replaced, and felt good enough to walk to the dinner table and socialize that very evening.
Now, as soon as you get back to your room from post-op they will have you stand and walk a bit...for hip and knee replacement.

I had a new knee installed 3 years ago, I play mostly doubles but can play singles. I jog a couple miles a couple times a week. Weight is under control and I am pretty much pain free for normal stuff.

It does get stiff if I'm squatting a lot or kneeling for a long time and I did lose some range of motion, but tennis...people who don't know me would never guess I had fake knee.
 

MathGeek

Hall of Fame
#9
I'd never go into any surgical procedure with enthusiasm. Educating myself on the risks and reading all the disclaimers and fine print make surgery something of a last resort for the well-informed.

Working hard to reduce wear and tear and make it as long as possible with the original equipment.
 
#10
There are going to be some great positive outcomes and some not so great. There are always risks to surgery. Like not waking up... is one
 

sphinx780

Hall of Fame
#11
You gotta do what you gotta do. Genetics, surgeon, fitness, age, playstyle all factor in. I'm 3 years out from right thr and one from left thr (took surgeons advice vs doing both at once). Glad I did it. I play both singles and doubles without issue but I am not 40 yet. I focus most on staying fit and playing once or twice a week. So far so good.

If things go bad, my quality of life now is night and day from the pain I lived with prior.
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
#12
I had my right hip totally replaced 8 years ago in my late 40s. I have played competitive tennis pretty much all of my life. I continue to play tournament singles and doubles (plus league doubles--but truthfully, much more singles) so far without any problems (frankly fewer issues that the 2 painful years before the surgery). I will say that I was in pretty good shape before the surgery, did my rehab with a vengeance and remain in good shape. So far so good. I would note that the only "impact training" I do is on the court (4-6 days a week, whether I am playing tournaments/league matches) or not--my off court regimen is cycling, elliptical and weight lifting (a tennis-focused program of weight exercises). I also see my hip doctor once a year to check on it, given my activity, and so far, so good.

And the technology is even better (and the surgery less invasive) than it was then. But I would suggest the better shape you are in and stay in, the better off you will be (no kidding, duh!). The only thing I would do differently is have the surgery earlier than I did.
 
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