Hip replacements and tennis...

sphinx780

Hall of Fame
Long story short... my hips don't like me. So I will be having a hip replacement in the right and based on the current state of arthritis, the left will follow in the next couple years.

The rub: I'm 36.

So the conversation becomes 2 or 3 in each hip barring medical improvements.

I would be interested to hear the thoughts from the hell with it crowd and the be careful crowd on how a chap goes about this and the potential to get back to my happy place (courts, not midgets on wooden horses)
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
Several older males and females in my tennis scene have had hip replacements. After a period of rehab, they back to playing doubles. Some attempt singles, but they were slow before and after the surgery, so they do not have much success in singles. Rehab seemed to take at least 6 months before they felt comfortable on the courts. 2 cents.

BTW, I know a lot more people with knee replacements.
 

Raul_SJ

G.O.A.T.
The guys I know with knee replacements say their Doctors tell them to avoid Tennis because the high impact will wear out the replacements faster...

Don't know if this applies to hip replacements as well.
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
There are orthopedists who will tell you the truth and orthopedists who will tell you what you want to hear. The long and the short of it is that tennis will shorten the time until your next hip replacement, and honest orthopedists will tell you to consider some other activity. If it were me, I'd get more seriously into bicycling and billiards.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
I cried because I had no shoes.
Then I met a man who had no feet.






















































Then I cried again because Ash was coaching him.
 

Ash_Smith

Legend
You should try wheelchair tennis Sureshs - we saw from your video that you often let the ball bounce twice.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
You should try wheelchair tennis Sureshs - we saw from your video that you often let the ball bounce twice.
What am I supposed to do if it bounces twice coming to me in practice? I just use it as an opportunity to hit the ball. Do you expect me to run forward and get it in one bounce when I am just hitting?
 

sphinx780

Hall of Fame
There are orthopedists who will tell you the truth and orthopedists who will tell you what you want to hear. The long and the short of it is that tennis will shorten the time until your next hip replacement, and honest orthopedists will tell you to consider some other activity. If it were me, I'd get more seriously into bicycling and billiards.
Yeah, the Ortho I'm working with is honest about it instead of trying to tell me what I would ideally have love to have heard. I'm realistic about it although I don't see my self going for billiards anytime soon unless I can somehow combine it with the cycling. Hmmmm

Figured it'd at least be entertaining to hear thoughts from all different view points.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
You gotta quit crying and rub some dirt on it. Walk it off my man, it's only life!
You want me to walk it off, Ash wants me to get double bounces. But I don't want to come on here asking about knee or hip replacement so I will take it easy.
 

sphinx780

Hall of Fame
Several older males and females in my tennis scene have had hip replacements. After a period of rehab, they back to playing doubles. Some attempt singles, but they were slow before and after the surgery, so they do not have much success in singles. Rehab seemed to take at least 6 months before they felt comfortable on the courts. 2 cents.

BTW, I know a lot more people with knee replacements.
Yeah, I know many older folks who keep up tennis after the hip replacement, but a big determinant is the lifespan of the hip and the ability to move. I've got to figure as an athletic 36 year old, if I chose to play, I'd be putting more wear and tear on the parts than your average 65 year old would be each time on the court.

The guys I know with knee replacements say their Doctors tell them to avoid Tennis because the high impact will wear out the replacements faster...

Don't know if this applies to hip replacements as well.
From everything I'm soaking in, it definitely applies to hip replacements as well although the hip is much more supported by muscle than a knee so the wear and tear is more of the issue than the potential issues with a knee replacement blowing out.

Yep, many! Drop me an email if you are considering it and I can put you in touch with somebody who can help - assume you're US based (most on here seem to be!)
Yup, I'm US based. I'll be sure to shoot you an email if/when I get to that point.
 

Fred132

Rookie
I know a guy who's back to playing dubs after having both hips replaced.

He's enjoying himself and moving pretty well. No idea about the hips wearing out quicker thing.
 

ttwarrior1

Professional
really wish you wouldn't do this. See a chiro first and take high doses of liquid calcium with magnesium along with glucosamine, manganese and gelatin and listen to the vids of dr peter glidden and dr joel wallach on youtube.

Also do stretch and strength exercises for the hip.
 

sphinx780

Hall of Fame
really wish you wouldn't do this. See a chiro first and take high doses of liquid calcium with magnesium along with glucosamine, manganese and gelatin and listen to the vids of dr peter glidden and dr joel wallach on youtube.

Also do stretch and strength exercises for the hip.
Appreciate the thoughts!

Ideally, I would have loved to have gone this route. I've seen two separate Chiros. Took a PT's advice for stretching and strengthening the past year and have had a regular dose of glocosamine for years due to my knee surgeries way back. Seriously just thought I was getting old and 1-2 workouts a week wasn't cutting it.

Here's the problem, the arthritis isn't the sole issue. There is Impingement in the right hip (literally bone on bone, no space in the hip socket) and the balls of my hip have a defect, basically creating a jagged edge that enters the socket any time I spread my hips further than shoulder width. They are guessing that this is a major reason for the breakdown of the joints and such an early onset of arthritis.

Have you ever jammed your hip on the court? Imagine if every time you landed on one leg, it felt like that. Then the nerves are so fired up from the jarring that you have to plan on 5-6 hours before you're comfortable enough to sleep. Then figure when you get up in the morning, you'll need 20-30 minutes of walking before the leg feels loosened up. I feel like I've done what I can to remedy it with less intrusive options.
 
I know there are different techniques to replace the hip and this may have some impact on how much tennis you can continue to play after surgery and rehab. Generally a surgeon will do the surgery one way. You should get at least two opinions, one with the traditional replacement and one with the metal on metal technique.
 

sphinx780

Hall of Fame
I had hip pain for several months and i was seriously scared that i might need some kind of hip surgery..I bought this book and followed the exercises dilligently http://www.amazon.com/Heal-Your-Hip...qid=1404528031&sr=1-1&keywords=heal+your+hips
i also dropped 25-30lbs and limited my singles to only 2-3 times a week.
Pain is completely gone now so we'll see.
Congratulations on the
pain going away. Because of the formation of my hip bones, most stretches for hips aggravate my condition. Amazingly frustrating for a person who likes to put a plan in place and bust my butt to get there.

I know there are different techniques to replace the hip and this may have some impact on how much tennis you can continue to play after surgery and rehab. Generally a surgeon will do the surgery one way. You should get at least two opinions, one with the traditional replacement and one with the metal on metal technique.
I've heard the metal on metal has been causing toxicity issues in some, but haven't really dug into the research yet. I'm in complete agreement that more than one opinion is an absolute must before taking the plunge.
 

comeback

Hall of Fame
Congratulations on the
pain going away. Because of the formation of my hip bones, most stretches for hips aggravate my condition. Amazingly frustrating for a person who likes to put a plan in place and bust my butt to get there.



I've heard the metal on metal has been causing toxicity issues in some, but haven't really dug into the research yet. I'm in complete agreement that more than one opinion is an absolute must before taking the plunge.
Thanks but most of the book aren't stretches..Mostly pool exercises
 

sphinx780

Hall of Fame
Got it. I read over the overview and saw, pool, land and intensive stretching.

Without reading the book, I'd think that the pool is an ideal solution to strengthen while removing the gravitational resistance.
 

sphinx780

Hall of Fame
Well, two full years after my first replacement I am about to hit the courts with the second hip now done. Pain free life is so much more joyful.

The first one was amazing. I felt like I was given a new lease on life and on the courts. Partly due to the fact that I have to keep up a regular and focused workout regimen to protect my robo parts.

My new philosophy : Enjoy now, because I could get hit by a bus in ten years anyway.
 

norcal

Legend
Hey that's great to hear! I share your philosophy of keeping with the activities you love (within reason) rather than taking up stamp collecting. I had hip surgery yesterday (which thread I will update shortly) and it sounds like we have similar problems although yours reached a much more critical stage.

Here's the problem, the arthritis isn't the sole issue. There is Impingement in the right hip (literally bone on bone, no space in the hip socket) and the balls of my hip have a defect, basically creating a jagged edge that enters the socket any time I spread my hips further than shoulder width. They are guessing that this is a major reason for the breakdown of the joints and such an early onset of arthritis.
This is exactly what my Dr told me. Basically I have a birth defect in both hips (shape of the hip balls) which has caused impingement, labral damage and arthritis. Fortunately I caught mine earlier than you (first diagnosed as severe groin strain) and have avoided replacement surgery. I too look forward to getting back on the court pain free for the first time in forever. One hip down and one to go!
 

sphinx780

Hall of Fame
Glad to hear you caught it early. Mine was always on the outside of the hips so I fought through it for years thinking I needed to focus more on stretching and strengthening the hip flexors. That being said, the post surgery side has been wonderful. Hope the same for you @norcal!
 

markwillplay

Hall of Fame
been there done that. I am 46 and have had both hips replaced. I can play doubles and singles. I only play singles on soft courts. I was extremely fast (yes, I said that) before my surgeries and now I am not as quick no doubt, but people that play with me think I play almost the same. I was out od the game for five years and recently got back into it. Everyone is different. The better shape you are in before you have hip replacement, the better the recovery. Osteoarthritis because of impingement, cam or pincer (I had same thing) does not get better. Age has nothing to do with it. Get it done and move on. But research your surgeon and be your own advocate.
 

markwillplay

Hall of Fame
by the way, norcal, I had the exact same thing you had. From birth. Just did not show up until I was late 30s early 40s. Been an athlete all my life and they were on a clock from birth.

I should say this too. I NEVER run for fitness anymore. I use elliptical and other body resistant exercises to stay fit....and I am fit. The only time I ever run or move that way is on a tennis court. My Dr. has no problem with that.

I also play 3.5 now instead of 4.0 because quite frankly, I don't want to play as "hard" as I did before. My game is more laid back. I suppose if I win a bunch of matches in league play, I will get bumped up, but I am enjoying just being back in the game.
 

norcal

Legend
Thanks for the input Mark, glad to hear you are on the courts enjoying tennis again! I too relied a lot on my movement so when I recover I will play a bit more aggressively (which is fun anyways), not run for all those shots I *can* get to and try and play a 'smoother' game. And yeah, no way on distance running or other 'pounding' activities, I'll save my joints for tennis. I had been playing at a fairly high level while dealing with the chronic condition, no reason I shouldn't be as good when healed. 3 days after surgery I'm not even using crutches...and sure continuing tennis probably means someday I will need full replacements...but as evidenced in this thread even that doesn't mean and end to tennis, far from it.
 

sphinx780

Hall of Fame
Interesting to hear that this is more common than I would have thought. Glad to hear your back in the game Mark!

When I was told to stay away from long distance running by the doctor before the first one I broke out laughing. I've never been a runner. So it was nice to finally have an excuse. The elliptical on the other hand, has always been a great source of cardio for me. Outside of tennis, my exercise isn't tough on the joints fortunately, so the only thing shortening the lifespan of my parts will be what keeps my mind in good spirits. Cardio and resistance training most specifically geared toward keeping the core and hips at the level they need to stay at over anything else.

I played my way from 4.5 down to 4.0 as the arthritis started to severely limit my movement. With one replaced I played myself back up to 4.5 and as the second hip really degenerated, I learned how to better work around my growing weaknesses to compete at the same level so I expect to hold level without having to put a major pounding on my body. Luckily I've always been a higher risk power player over grinding out points, so now, even more excuse to keep points quick and aggressive.
 

markwillplay

Hall of Fame
I still love to serve and volley, I just end up hitting volleys a little furthur back. I actually think that the smoother I play, the better prepared I am to hit those volleys. I would like to get back to 4.0 (and be able to win tournaments) so we'll see. I lay 4.0 guys all the time and win, but not in tournaments where I have to play more upper level 4.0s. No rush, I am enjoying being able to get out there. Glad you guys are getting along so well as well. And yes, I really do like dubbs as well. Try to mix it up now and play less per week which is fine by me.
 

sphinx780

Hall of Fame
I hit the courts yesterday for the first time post hip replacement #2. I expected to hit for a while and get a feel for things again, maybe play a set. It's amazing what being able to move laterally again was able to do for consistency. It felt like I hadn't really left the court at all, so we did our usual 15 min warmup and played a full match. Sure, I was rusty but it was much better than I expected to be.

I'm not far off from where I was pre-surgery and can see the game changing abilities that I know have in movement. I'm not talking about long sprints and joint pounding, but just the little adjustment steps and quick sidestep to close off a volley. This has me very excited.

Now, has anyone tried to re-configure their serve by having their leg lengthened by 1/2"? There'll definitely be an adjustment period there.
 
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