Hitting on the rise

#1
Any secrets / tips to this?

@J011yroger gave me a tip about "creating mini circles" with the racquet hand (kind of like grooving a motion) so you always hit while the racquet is on the way up... works really well for hitting on the rise. More so on my backhand, perhaps because its an eastern grip. I'm currently trying to groove this motion into my strokes so its unconscious. The backhand is going well but the forehand still needs some work.

J011y also said something about trying to hit on the rise or the peak of the ball which ive been experimenting with. Wow you can hit a lot of winners with this tactic!! My backhand down the line specifically seems to excel at this.

Are eastern grips the best for hitting on the rise? My forehand is semiwestern but struggles to hit on the rise comparatively... but i tried hitting with an eastern forehand grip today and that seemed to help somewhat. Obviously it works for Federer!

When hitting on the rise, to minimise errors, is it best to hit the ball back where it came from? Sometimes when i try to change direction when hitting on the rise, i completely shank the shot. The forehand seems easier to change direction with perhaps.
 
#2
You have to shorten your back swing, it's too hard to time a big swing. I like to get a clear visual snapshot of the ball just after the bounce and then I think of just trying to catch the ball with the racket. Kind of like if you're playing catch with a baseball. You place the glove behind the ball and let it come into the glove. Same thing, no big loop, just get the racket behind the ball and at the level of the ball and hit through it short back swing short follow through.
 

Raul_SJ

Hall of Fame
#5
You have to shorten your back swing, it's too hard to time a big swing. I like to get a clear visual snapshot of the ball just after the bounce and then I think of just trying to catch the ball with the racket. Kind of like if you're playing catch with a baseball. You place the glove behind the ball and let it come into the glove. Same thing, no big loop, just get the racket behind the ball and at the level of the ball and hit through it short back swing short follow through.
Not clear if OP is taking it close to the bounce or just at/near the peak (still rising or not descending). If it is the latter, Normal length swing will still work and even that split second taken away from opponent can make a difference.. Would recommend that first before progressing to taking it close the bounce (compact swing).

J011y also said something about trying to hit on the rise or the peak of the ball which ive been experimenting with. Wow you can hit a lot of winners with this tactic!!
 
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#6
I agree that there is a difference between hitting an incoming ball with pace on the rise versus hitting a more half volley shot from deeper in the court. Getting close to the bounce/staying low and shortening the back swing are good recommendations for hitting a floating ball on the rise.

When it comes to just regularly hitting on the rise, Eastern grip will allow for a wider contact point range as the strings will be showing to the ball a little longer. Hitting the ball on the rise is often accompanied by a more linear swing path and linear swing paths also go more hand in hand with less extreme grips. With that being said, it’s still possible to hit on the rise with a semi western grip, timing may just be slightly more difficult, but if that’s the grip you already use, I would stick with it.

The main reason to hit on the rise is to take time away from the opponent. Judging by your initial post, it seems to me that you are making mistakes because you associate hitting on the rise with winning the point immediately. I wouldn’t worry so much about whether or not you’re changing direction when hitting on the rise but more about whether you’re going for too much simply because you are hitting on the rise. One can hit on the rise every shot for a 30 shot point, with the main benefit being that you just made life much harder on your opponent than they have experienced in a long time, considering they were still able to get 15 shots back while you effectively hit on the rise. One can also hit a short ball on the rise with good placement (say to their backhand) and follow that on the rise approach to the net knowing they have little time, or much less time than usual to react. Hitting a winner on the rise is a small subset of the ideology which likely may have happened anyway without us making a conscious effort to be hitting on the rise.
 
#8
Shorten the backswing and get low with the legs since ur contact point is lower, most people stand tall on such balls.
Exactly. You’re using the opponent’s pace against him so you don’t have to supply as much as your own. And robbing time.

It’s the tennis equivalent of baseball’s short hop - easy.

Practice - like pretty much everything else.
 
#9
I think theres a bit of a difference here.

If we play a topspinner on a bouncy hardcourt, i find most of opponents forehands rise over my head at the peak of the bounce. By "taking it on the rise" im still talking about between hips to shoulder strikezone, not off my shoelaces straight after the bounce
 
#10
Generally speaking taking the ball on the rise means at hip height. With eastern the stike zone is between hip and chest height.
Like any shot just need to determine if the error and inaccuracy is worth the time taken away from the opposition. That depends a lot on the opposition's pace and amount of kick off ground. Obviously playing grass you get more benefit and less risk if in good condition. On a rough HC the risk to reward is likely poorer and more likely employed when fatigue is issue or oppenent consistency is better so need to force play.
 
#11
Generally speaking taking the ball on the rise means at hip height. With eastern the stike zone is between hip and chest height.
Like any shot just need to determine if the error and inaccuracy is worth the time taken away from the opposition. That depends a lot on the opposition's pace and amount of kick off ground. Obviously playing grass you get more benefit and less risk if in good condition. On a rough HC the risk to reward is likely poorer and more likely employed when fatigue is issue or oppenent consistency is better so need to force play.
The key to taking a ball on the rise is to know which balls to do it with and what technique works the best for these selected balls. Once you know which balls are best for taking on the rise, Imo you can now employ the Timing enhanced ATP Fh for the reason it evolved.
 
#13
The key to taking a ball on the rise is to know which balls to do it with and what technique works the best for these selected balls. Once you know which balls are best for taking on the rise, Imo you can now employ the Timing enhanced ATP Fh for the reason it evolved.
Whats "the timing enhanced atp fh"?
 
#14
Whats "the timing enhanced atp fh"?
'Timing Enhanced' is a new name for the ATP forehand, that not only is more gender friendly, but better describes why this Fh evolved on tour. Christophe and I came up with 'Timing Enhanced' name back when we were discussing how he had discovered this takeback method, but wasn't too sure how or why it was done.
 
#15
Great drill for this is to rally while standing inside the baseline.
Do the reps, and it becomes natural. I now take balls on the rise in rallies, instead of backing off.
At some point, I want to see if it can translate to ROS
 
#16
If you play against the wall or have access to one, try that out. I've spent so many hours hitting against a wall, which is how I got so good at taking the ball early and essentially was forced to shorten my backswing. So my normal playing style now is a much-shortened backswing and I'm far more comfortable stepping inside the baseline to take shots.
 
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