Hitting/Pointers for Juniors: What to Charge

kingcheetah

Hall of Fame
I just got contacted by a former HS teacher, inquiring if I'd like to hit with her middle school aged son some and offer pointers, and asking me to name a rate. I've coached some quick start before for 4 year olds (plenty of stories there), and was making $18 hourly. Does that sound like a fair price for one on one work with a d3 player with some coaching experience but isn't a "teaching pro"? I don't have a ton of expenses as I'd just be working with him at the school or somewhere similar.
 

tennis_ocd

Hall of Fame
I just got contacted by a former HS teacher, inquiring if I'd like to hit with her middle school aged son some and offer pointers, and asking me to name a rate. I've coached some quick start before for 4 year olds (plenty of stories there), and was making $18 hourly. Does that sound like a fair price for one on one work with a d3 player with some coaching experience but isn't a "teaching pro"? I don't have a ton of expenses as I'd just be working with him at the school or somewhere similar.
Assuming you can teach technically sound strokes and tennis strategy I'd lean to 2x that.
 

kingcheetah

Hall of Fame
I used to pay $20 to a couple of guys to hit with my daughter for an hour. I think they basically looked at it as getting paid to play tennis because my daughter was fairly advanced at the time.

My daughter who just turned 18 now gives lessons to a couple of young girls for $15 an hour. It's her first job and she's young so she's not charging very much. If I were you I would start out at 20 -25 bucks an hour. But whatever you feel comfortable with it.
I think the $20 mark sounds pretty reasonable. I've got some experience coaching and a lot of playing experience, and am getting a Masters in Teaching, but I'm also not a professional coach, and it would be a side source of income while I'm completing my program.
 

10isMaestro

Semi-Pro
I recently looked for quotes regarding private and group lessons. Four one hour sessions with a private tutor costs about $140 (CAD), so it's $35 per hour. To be fair, all of the instructors involved have lots of experience with players of all ages, so you do get a qualified instructor at that price.

Now, you used to hit for $18 per hour and have some coaching experience. Your price should thus be somewhere in the low to mid 20s.
 

tennis_ocd

Hall of Fame
I recently looked for quotes regarding private and group lessons. Four one hour sessions with a private tutor costs about $140 (CAD), so it's $35 per hour. To be fair, all of the instructors involved have lots of experience with players of all ages, so you do get a qualified instructor at that price.

Now, you used to hit for $18 per hour and have some coaching experience. Your price should thus be somewhere in the low to mid 20s.
Perhaps it's a location based thing. I couldn't find anything remotely close to $35 an hour. $50-$80/hr. seems the going price (for a certified coach on public, outdoor courts.) In that market, a college player should get $30 to $35 an hour imo.
 

tennis_ocd

Hall of Fame
We pay division 1-2 guys $35/hour to serve as hitting partners, had a solid d-3 guy who would hit for $25.
Would you differentiate a hitting partner from a "coach?" If coaching I'd envision hand feeding some balls and other activity a bit less fun than simply practicing your own strokes... Any college kid could hit with a high school player; not everyone could coach.
 

10isMaestro

Semi-Pro
Perhaps it's a location based thing.
The price should vary depending on the area, indeed. The aformentionned prices concern the Montreal area. It's more focused on hockey and soccer than tennis, so you should expect prices to be lower here than in other areas where tennis is more popular.
 

10isMaestro

Semi-Pro
It's very difficult to find advanced hitting partners for players who take it serious.
It depends on what the player in question is looking to practice. Touring pros sometimes have the chance to hit with each other, but in such circumstances they focus on point play. Most of the time, they're doing drills using one or two less skilled players. You can even practice you return of serve for a match against a huge server with someone who has just an acceptable serve -- you just need to have him serve from inside the court.

The only time when you really need a great partner is when you're playing points. The rest of the time, they can be slightly less or even sometimes significantly less skilled than you and you'll still get a lot out of your session.
 
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