How are your non USTA leagues?

Discussion in 'Adult League & Tournament Talk' started by J011yroger, Feb 15, 2017.

  1. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    13,075
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    Here we have country club leagues where each club fields the best team they can. Matches are 5 courts of doubles on outdoor clay, level is from strong 5.0 to weak 4.5 and the league fee is $100 or $50 for the entire season. Playoffs determine the league winner.

    It's great that the matches are 6pm instead of 9pm for USTA. Only drawback is no singles.

    J
     
    #1
  2. r2473

    r2473 G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2006
    Messages:
    10,363
    We have a tennis ladder. Level is from strong 5.0 to weak 4.5. $50 for the entire season. Runs about 2 months. Playoffs determine the ladder winner.

    It's successfully run for 11 consecutive years now.
     
    UtahTennisAddict likes this.
    #2
  3. Angle Queen

    Angle Queen Professional

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2010
    Messages:
    904
    Location:
    On the deuce side, looking to come in
    I love, love, love our non-USTA league and have mentioned it many times here on TT.

    I'm not sure of the all the total workings of our "Suburban League"...just that my personal cost is $15 for two 7-week seasons (fall & spring...where we do a home-and-home kinda thing). And that includes balls.

    Format is three lines of singles (for an 8-game pro-set) followed by four lines of doubles (to 10-by-2). Players may double up (and play both singles and doubles). Lineups must be in 'order of strength' but the actual rules are somewhat loose. But most of the teams have been together for many years and the captains know who's who. There's very little funny business.

    And it's team relegation style. If you're one of the top two teams, the whole team moves up (at least in their division/day). If you're one of the bottom two...you move down. It's the rare team that tries to get away with a 'ringer' -- as all it does is move them up...to then lose badly if they can't sustain things all the way down the lineup.

    The League itself ranges from the Pros on Mondays (literally...it's their one opportunity to play both for fun and realistic competition)...down to the (2.5?) ladies on Thursdays who are lucky to keep the ball in play.

    The home team provides food/refreshments between the singles and doubles...and most teams go out for lunch afterwards. My better half calls us the "Ladies Who Lunch But Play Tennis First" (except even he acknowledges that, at least in our division, we ain't just pitty-pattin' the ball around).

    Haven't played USTA in years. Absolutely no regrets.
     
    #3
  4. nytennisaddict

    nytennisaddict Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2007
    Messages:
    4,107
    Location:
    Westchester (lower), NY
    i haven't played in them, but have a couple friends that do.. the non-usta inter-club leagues are extremely competitive... usually all recent, and still-in-shape, ex-college on the "A" team, and for the 40y+ not-quite-college-shape ex-college on the "B" team... rounding out the "C" and below are low 4.5's and 4.0's... obviously clubs will vary.

    they have a cool team ladder system... ie. like paddle... you can make up whatever team you want (ie. unlike usta where everyone has to be the same NTRP),... but if you can't hold your own as a team, you get sent down a level, and the top team from the lower level, gets sent up... kind of like the A,AA,AAA,majors in baseball

    costwise... well the clubs are expensive... ranging from clubs that have a 30k initiation fee + 5k yearly fee, to the "low range" where it's 3-4k for a summer membership.... after paying the club fees, what's another couple hundred or so :p
     
    #4
  5. Nacho

    Nacho Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2015
    Messages:
    765
    Location:
    Columbus, Ohio USA
    alas, both club leagues and USTA leagues have a lot to be desired. They all cater to 4.0/3.5 players and jr's, which are basically the bulk of recreation players out there. Good jr's train by other means, so its just basically average jr's around. The local tennis association runs a summer league which competes with the USTA leagues, and really has no conclusion, just a string of matches. My 5.0/4.5 equivalent team won the league a year ago, but because there were only 4 teams there was no playoff or reward....The other divisions have a lot more hoopla.

    There is a ton of potential, but no one seems to want to put much energy into it. 4.5/5.0 players are around, but many stop playing or show little interest in trying to compete on the league level. And then there are very few tournament nearby, making it even worse....Lots of low hanging fruit here if someone wanted to make it happen.
     
    #5
  6. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    13,075
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    The country club leagues here don't require membership to play on the team. So it's pretty cool to be able to play at some very nice clubs and not have to pay for membership.

    J
     
    MathGeek likes this.
    #6
  7. J011yroger

    J011yroger G.O.A.T.

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Messages:
    13,075
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    We have playoffs for the top however many teams and it's kind of funny after the finals everybody just shakes hands and goes home like see ya next year.

    J
     
    #7
  8. Nacho

    Nacho Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2015
    Messages:
    765
    Location:
    Columbus, Ohio USA
    I believe it....Its fun to get some hardware just to have a little motivation....but at the high levels thats all it is, bragging rights. Its why I like the tournaments for competition a lot more then the leagues.
     
    #8
  9. cknobman

    cknobman Legend

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2007
    Messages:
    7,243
    Location:
    Saudi Arabia
    I play a Monday league, cost $40.
    Length: 8 weeks

    Structure:
    4 brackets of 16 players. You only play people in your bracket.
    Bottom bottom bracket: ~3.0-3.5
    Bottom top: ~3.5-4.0
    Top bottom: ~4.0, with one or two 4.5
    Top top: 4.5, with one or two 5.0

    Format: 14 games of singles, then 14 games of double (your singles opponent becomes your doubles partner) against other players in the same bracket as yourself.
    Scores recorded as your total game count win/loss.

    Top and Bottom half is ordered, each season, by most games won top down from previous season.
    Each season the highest 2 game winners from bottom half move up to top half, lowest 2 game winners from top half move down to bottom half.

    Its a great league and I really enjoy it.
     
    #9
  10. Dartagnan64

    Dartagnan64 Hall of Fame

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2015
    Messages:
    1,633
    Our club runs a men's league that is based on 9 teams with 6 lines from low 3.0 to 4.5. Lines 1&2, 3&4, and 5&6 team up for a set of doubles against an opposing team (no ad scoring, tie breaker at 5-5) and then each line plays singles for a set (no ad scoring tie breaker at 5-5). The number of games you win is accumulated for total individual and team score. Top 4 teams make the playoffs. Prize is usually a gift certificate to the pro shop.

    My team has never made the playoffs before but this session looks good as our 5 and 6 court is dominating and 1 through 4 are doing reasonably well. Sadly I've developed some mild TE and am just trying to make it through without letting my teammates down too much.
     
    #10
  11. MathGeek

    MathGeek Professional

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2014
    Messages:
    1,138
    This is the kinda action I need a piece of.
     
    #11
  12. lemintz

    lemintz New User

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2013
    Messages:
    79
    Location:
    Arlington, VA
    I played in a singles ladder run by our city/county tennis association. It runs from April through the end of October, pretty long season, which I like a lot. Last year we had 120+ players, mostly solid 4.0 and 4.5 players, few 5.0s and 3.5s. Even some ex-college players compete, so you can actually get a lot of good quality play.

    It's a really nice ladder with a pretty flexible format - it's up to players to schedule match time and location, and we're lucky to have dozens of really good and well maintained hard court courts. Great way to meet lots of potential hitting partners for future hits/practice

    Same organization also runs number of leagues, and there are quite a few teams, but I haven't played that because it's a lot of doubles which I'm not a fan of b/c I'm trying to maximize little time I have, so I play singles only.
     
    #12
  13. Rattler

    Rattler Semi-Pro

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2009
    Messages:
    472
    Location:
    On the fringe
    I love my Non-USTA league...so much so that I'm no longer a USTA member.

    Haven't been since just after I retired from officiating.
     
    #13
  14. UtahTennisAddict

    UtahTennisAddict New User

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2016
    Messages:
    17
    Not by chance on Utah are you?
     
    #14
  15. NTRPolice

    NTRPolice Professional

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1,493
    Excellent. They're ran much better than USTA in some cases. The only good thing about USTA is the national parent organization. The governing body does the rules, gets the permits, locations, and allows for the advancement to districts, sections and nationals.
     
    #15

Share This Page