how do i get comfortable with volley grip

Aysuh

New User
whenever i try to do volley or serve with continental grip it feels so wierd how can i get used to this.
 

socallefty

Legend
whenever i try to do volley or serve with continental grip it feels so wierd how can i get used to this.
Changing grips is not easy - but, since you are 16, it might not be too late for you if you get yourself a good coach. For most adult rec players, it is almost impossible to change their grips dramatically with or without coaching help after a few years of bad technique.
 

Aysuh

New User
Changing grips is not easy - but, since you are 16, it might not be too late for you if you get yourself a good coach. For most adult rec players, it is almost impossible to change their grips dramatically with or without coaching help after a few years of bad technique.
 

Slicerman

Semi-Pro
As a beginner, the toughest thing to wrap my head around was figuring out how to aim the serve with continental grip. I would visualize using the palm as the direction of the serve. And make a point to stay sideways on the serve. When you stand sideways, your racquet face will already be facing the service box.

For volley, place your racquet to the side of your body and slightly forward, with slightly laidback wrist. You will hit most your volleys in this position. Try to keep the arm relatively still and stable. The involvement of the arm is actually quite minimal, a lot of the work for the volley is using the legs.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Note that some players feel more comfortable with a semi-conti grip (Aussie grip) than a standard conti grip. The Conti grip puts the base index knuckle on bevel 2 whereas the Aussie grip has it at 2.5 (corner between level 2 and bevel 3)

This grip will likely make it easier for hitting high volleys but more difficult to hit low volleys.

Note also that volley grips, be it Conti or semi-Conti), are typically a bit choked up on the handle. That is, they might be 1 cm to 3 cm shorter than your serve or groundstroke grip
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
whenever i try to do volley or serve with continental grip it feels so wierd how can i get used to this.
Just do it. It becomes less weird over time.

I remember when I started getting more serious about tennis, I decided to switch from an eastern FH grip to a semi-western. Took me 8 weeks of shanks and bad play to get it down. But now it's as natural as if I started it that way.

Like most sports where you started doing things the wrong way, it takes a step back before you can take a couple steps forward. You have to be willing to suck a bit at first.
 

Nellie

Hall of Fame
Make sure you are using a proper technique. If you have a waiter's grip serve, going to a continental grip is not going to solve your problems. Likewise, if you volley with your hand held in front of your torso, like you are holding a stop sign, using a continental grip is not going to improve your volleys.
 

Friedman Whip

Professional
Like SA mentioned I would recommend using the Aussie grip rather than true continental. Then I would suggest using some duct tape to tape your hand onto the racquet with the Aussie grip. Then find a wall or a really cooperative partner and hit nothing but forehand and backhand slices and volleys for entire practice. And maybe some serves - using the same grip. This will keep you from slowly and unconsciously sliding your hand back toward your former grips because they "feel better".
 

Rattler

Hall of Fame
That sounds like so much work. Do you have a simpler, easier tip? Is there a blue pill one can take where after ingesting you wake up and magically know how to volley like the pros? ;)
(Read in a Yoda voice)
No!
There is only one way
Do or do not…the choice is yours
 

Friedman Whip

Professional
Note that some players feel more comfortable with a semi-conti grip (Aussie grip) than a standard conti grip. The Conti grip puts the base index knuckle on bevel 2 whereas the Aussie grip has it at 2.5 (corner between level 2 and bevel 3)

This grip will likely make it easier for hitting high volleys but more difficult to hit low volleys.

Note also that volley grips, be it Conti or semi-Conti), are typically a bit choked up on the handle. That is, they might be 1 cm to 3 cm shorter than your serve or groundstroke grip
I have no problem hitting low FH or BH volleys with an Aussie grip. Actually I think hitting a low backhand volley with the Aussie grip is easier than with a true continental grip.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
I have no problem hitting low FH or BH volleys with an Aussie grip. Actually I think hitting a low backhand volley with the Aussie grip is easier than with a true continental grip.
In the 1990s, Patrick Rafter, a prolific serve & volley player, was the first player I had noticed using the Aussie grip at the net. He appeared to be using it for both forehand and backhand volleys. However, images (and videos) reveal that he was using something close to a standard Continental grip for low volleys (on both sides, I believe). I found this usage to be quite comfortable for myself as well.
 

RVT

Rookie
whenever i try to do volley or serve with continental grip it feels so wierd how can i get used to this.
my answer to almost everything is "practice against the wall"..but it's true. Practice half volleys and volleys against the wall. Also, make sure all of your feeds are hit with a conti grip.

And not to open the "mini tennis" can of worms, but I'd recommend hitting your warm-up "mini tennis" forehands with a conti grip as well.
 

RVT

Rookie
In the 1990s, Patrick Rafter, a prolific serve & volley player, was the first player I had noticed using the Aussie grip at the net. He appeared to be using it for both forehand and backhand volleys. However, images (and videos) reveal that he was using something close to a standard Continental grip for low volleys (on both sides, I believe). I found this usage to be quite comfortable for myself as well.
I think that a lot of people who grew up learning in the 80's use an Aussie grip (or "soft conti" on the forehand). I use it, and I switch to a conti on the backhand. That said, I'm not sure I'd recommend it except to a really young player. I think it just adds a layer of confusion--and personally, I'd had trouble introducing multiple grips to adults. I know others have had a different experience, but that's what I'd observed with a lot of folks. For simplicity's sake I'd go conti on the serve, volley and slice BH.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
(Read in a Yoda voice)
No!
There is only one way
Do or do not…the choice is yours
Botched quote aside (it's "No! Do... or do not. There is no try"), It all comes down to just using the right grip for the shot. No one uses a Western grip to hammer a nail. If you are serving the right way, it's only possible to do with a continental grip. Similarly it's virtually impossible to hit a low volley with a semi western grip.

So if gripping the racket feels wrong, likely there is something intrinsically wrong with your technique that has to be fixed at the same time.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
I think that a lot of people who grew up learning in the 80's use an Aussie grip (or "soft conti" on the forehand). I use it, and I switch to a conti on the backhand. That said, I'm not sure I'd recommend it except to a really young player. I think it just adds a layer of confusion--and personally, I'd had trouble introducing multiple grips to adults. I know others have had a different experience, but that's what I'd observed with a lot of folks. For simplicity's sake I'd go conti on the serve, volley and slice BH.
Note that the Continental grip that many players use for their serve is often a bit different from their volley Continental. That is, they will have the base index knuckle on bevel 2 for both Conti grips, but the heel pad placement might differ somewhat between the serve and the volley. Not everyone does this but it is not really all that uncommon.

I would usually encourage a student to volley with a Conti grip at the net. But if they were more comfortable with an Aussie grip, we would go with that. Whichever grip was chosen we will stick with that for developing their volleys.

At some point, some experienced players will learn to adjust from one grip to another. Many pros will incorporate a slight grip change from forehand to backhand or from high balls to low balls. This is usually a change of a half bevel or less.

Many players will find that the grip variety makes them a better player, not worse. If such changes are beyond your ability then, by all means, stick with less variety.
 

TennisCJC

Legend
there is no easy way to change grips other than practice and STICK WITH IT. When I first switched to a conti grip for serving, I literally hit balls wide into fence when serving from the deuce court as a right handed player. But, it is worth it as it is by far the best grip for serving.

Try these:
1. Review this video that talks about swing L to R toward net post for righty but ball goes toward service court because strings face court:

2. For volley, try this:
Notice how he simply turns a bit to the side and set the angle between arm and racket head and then blocks the ball with a bit of underspin. No wrist movement and no change in the racket to arm angle. Backhand volley is the same concept.
 

nyta2

Professional
That sounds like so much work. Do you have a simpler, easier tip? Is there a blue pill one can take where after ingesting you wake up and magically know how to volley like the pros? ;)
AlphaBrain promotes vivid dreams for me... in there i volley like a pro... skip all the messy sweating!
 

nyta2

Professional
whenever i try to do volley or serve with continental grip it feels so wierd how can i get used to this.
how much do you currently practice volleys. if you're like most 3.0-3.5's... it's like 15min a year. baseline bashing and hitting bigger than the pros, is the priority.
 

RyanRF

Professional
I think us more experienced players take for granted how difficult it is to use a different grip for forehand vs volley/serve.

But to make a long story short.... you force yourself to use the correct grip until eventually it feels familiar. This can take weeks/months/years depending on how often you play and how determined you are to get it right.

When I was starting out I'd estimate the full transition from 'frying pan' serves/volleys to continental took me about a year of 2x a week recreational play (no lessons). That's going from super unnatural feeling to fully comfortable.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
I think us more experienced players take for granted how difficult it is to use a different grip for forehand vs volley/serve.

But to make a long story short.... you force yourself to use the correct grip until eventually it feels familiar. This can take weeks/months/years depending on how often you play and how determined you are to get it right.

When I was starting out I'd estimate the full transition from 'frying pan' serves/volleys to continental took me about a year of 2x a week recreational play (no lessons). That's going from super unnatural feeling to fully comfortable.
I have seen several rec players work tirelessly with coaches to learn to use the right grip and it just won't stick. I've worked with my wife on this a lot. Even in drills where nothing is on the line her hand finds its way back to Eastern.

Whereas I can alter a grip in probably a few weeks. Last year I moved to a stronger conti for serves and volleys and it became natural fairly quickly.

Everyone's motor pattern flexibility is different which is why you have guys that have to have their rackets tuned to unbelievable levels of exactness and other folks that can play equally well with any frame you put in their hands.
 
I have seen several rec players work tirelessly with coaches to learn to use the right grip and it just won't stick. I've worked with my wife on this a lot. Even in drills where nothing is on the line her hand finds its way back to Eastern.

Whereas I can alter a grip in probably a few weeks. Last year I moved to a stronger conti for serves and volleys and it became natural fairly quickly.

Everyone's motor pattern flexibility is different which is why you have guys that have to have their rackets tuned to unbelievable levels of exactness and other folks that can play equally well with any frame you put in their hands.
What if she used Conti for every stroke for one entire match, including the FH [just slice it]? Would that help cement the grip?
 

Verbal_Kint

Rookie
Want to get used to a grip because it feels unnatural? Watch a movie or 2 while holding your racket with this grip. It will feel normal after that.
 

MoxMonkey

Rookie
I had spent a good part of the year I've been playing not being able to hit volleys with any consistency. I had an aversion to approaching the net, even when just practicing. The grip felt entirely unnatural and unstable.

Then about a month ago I made a massive massive leap forward in this.

Like several others have said, just keep doing it. Over and over. If you have patient hitting partners have them hit you dozens on dozens of balls to you at the net. Having confidence to play anywhere on the court opens up the game and makes it so much better.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I have three forehand grips, two backhand grips, two serve grips, two forehand volley grips and one backhand volley grip and I really don't think about it that much. I guess that there has been a ton of practice with the grips and the shots over a long period of time. I think that you just need practice, both on the court and off the court. You can bounce the ball on your racquet with whichever grip when you're watching TV in the living room.

I used to practice ball tosses in the living room while sitting on the couch.
 
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