How do you get fast? I want to become de Minaur of 4.0s!

RyanRF

Professional
As much as I dislike this answer... Some people are just born with it.

I'm lucky to be one of those people. I'm 5'9", 145 lbs, 33 yrs old, average shape, 4.0-4.5. I'm fast AF on the tennis court. I'm faster than 95% of the hundreds of 3.5 to 4.5 people I've played with. The other 5% seem equal. I'm not the kind of person to brag or exaggerate. God knows my tennis game has all sorts of issues, but running down balls is not one of them.

Funny thing though, I'm not a super fit guy. I didn't play sports growing up and didn't pick up tennis until my 20s. I don't run or lift. I hate going to the gym. I hate jogging. I could do maybe 3 miles at an 8min pace and then would have to slow down or pass out. I play with people that are obviously more fit than me and would embarrass me in the gym or on the track. And yet... they're not faster on the tennis court.

Something about chasing down tennis balls just works for me. Maybe it's the fact that I only have to sprint in 3-4 second bursts. Maybe it's because my goal is so immediate and visible. Maybe I've also got good anticipation.

Some part is definitely mental. In the sprint I'm thinking: "They're not expecting me to get that ball. I know I can get that ball." And when I get to that ball and play one more shot my opponent doesn't expect I immediately feel the reward, regardless of how the point plays out.

Watching other players I get the sense that not everyone thinks that way. They don't scramble and strain and lunge and reach beyond their comfort zone. They'll make an effort, but not an all-out effort. They're probably thinking "good shot. next point."

I say all this not to discourage drills, exercise, fitness, etc. All of that will be helpful. However some of it is natural, and some of it is mental, and I think those parts are pretty significant.
 

tennishabit

Hall of Fame
I wanna get faster, as it'll help me win more points.

What do yall do to get faster on the courts?
the best person u can be, or should be, is urself.............the 'speed' u'r talking abt must be 'acceleration/deceleration', man. watch out ur keens/ankles.......dey won't last very long if u want to be some1else, man:-D:-D:-D:-D:-D:-D:-D:-D...............
 

tennishabit

Hall of Fame
As much as I dislike this answer... Some people are just born with it.

I'm lucky to be one of those people. I'm 5'9", 145 lbs, 33 yrs old, average shape, 4.0-4.5. I'm fast AF on the tennis court. I'm faster than 95% of the hundreds of 3.5 to 4.5 people I've played with. The other 5% seem equal. I'm not the kind of person to brag or exaggerate. God knows my tennis game has all sorts of issues, but running down balls is not one of them.

Funny thing though, I'm not a super fit guy. I didn't play sports growing up and didn't pick up tennis until my 20s. I don't run or lift. I hate going to the gym. I hate jogging. I could do maybe 3 miles at an 8min pace and then would have to slow down or pass out. I play with people that are obviously more fit than me and would embarrass me in the gym or on the track. And yet... they're not faster on the tennis court.

Something about chasing down tennis balls just works for me. Maybe it's the fact that I only have to sprint in 3-4 second bursts. Maybe it's because my goal is so immediate and visible. Maybe I've also got good anticipation.

Some part is definitely mental. In the sprint I'm thinking: "They're not expecting me to get that ball. I know I can get that ball." And when I get to that ball and play one more shot my opponent doesn't expect I immediately feel the reward, regardless of how the point plays out.

Watching other players I get the sense that not everyone thinks that way. They don't scramble and strain and lunge and reach beyond their comfort zone. They'll make an effort, but not an all-out effort. They're probably thinking "good shot. next point."

I say all this not to discourage drills, exercise, fitness, etc. All of that will be helpful. However some of it is natural, and some of it is mental, and I think those parts are pretty significant.
spot on , man..................it's not 'run' or 'speed' at all n has very little to do w/ those. it only takes most likely <3 or 4 sec n in most cases only 1 or 2 as rec-ers won't hit extremely hard topspin super-duper wide to create distance for u to chase. maybe we should use a more proper word here, 'reflection'. it's something u 'r born w/ n very limited room to improve by training no matter how hard u train, man8-B8-B8-B8-B8-B8-B8-B8-B......................
 

AlexSV

Rookie
Here you go man

1. Power lift (squat, dead, bench, power clean, shoulder press) 3 times per week
2. Functional training (plyometrics, footwork drills, core work, stability work) 2 - 4 times per week
3. Stretch everyday
4. Work technique (learn how to move) into the functional training. Notice how stable the hips and shoulders are in that crazy footwork video (he isn't wasting time and energy by moving vertically)
 

megamind

Hall of Fame
Here you go man

1. Power lift (squat, dead, bench, power clean, shoulder press) 3 times per week
2. Functional training (plyometrics, footwork drills, core work, stability work) 2 - 4 times per week
3. Stretch everyday
4. Work technique (learn how to move) into the functional training. Notice how stable the hips and shoulders are in that crazy footwork video (he isn't wasting time and energy by moving vertically)
thanks for this

how will power lifting help?

others make sense
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
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SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Split steps, of course. But properly timed. And learn how do put yourself off balance for a quicker start -- as an elite sprinter does at the start of a race. Gravity steps, Flow steps and Mogul moves. Make sure that you are on the balls of your feet after your split step (or flow step) and for your recovery steps.


For training for power (explosiveness): rope skipping, wind sprints, jump squats, and other plyometric exercises.
 

tennishabit

Hall of Fame
In short burst sprints. Going up hills.
Long distance constant speed won't help much.
yup man, absolutely.......short burst/acceleration at max. speed is the only way to take u out of the comfort zone in order to expand it gradually. researchers found a couple of 6 sec burst sessions worth >30 min jogging:-D:-D:-D:-D:-D........

i prefer whole body weight push on my downhill/mt bike as no impact on my knees/ankles at all n i reckon ppl can do the same w/ a indoor stationary exercise bike too:love::love::love::love::love::love:...................
 
You will get injured for sure if you want to be faster.
And if its the knees well then good luck solving that.
Its better to do little coordination drills not the speed ones and even that you should not do a lot.
Just for the basic prevention and mobility.
Dont do it you will regret it and you will not get any faster in the long run.
You are not the first one to try this.
Tennis is about manipulating 2 to 4 meters of the court in a way you run as less as possible.
 
You will get injured for sure if you want to be faster.
If you do nothing except the quickness drills, that is probably a true statement.

If you also balance it out with flexibility and strength training, I would disagree.

And there are plenty of opportunities for injury even if one doesn't try to get quicker.

And if its the knees well then good luck solving that.
Its better to do little coordination drills not the speed ones and even that you should not do a lot.
Why should you not do a lot of coordination drills?

Just for the basic prevention and mobility.
Dont do it you will regret it and you will not get any faster in the long run.
Why wouldn't you get quicker? That's the whole purpose of the drills.

And what does "long run" mean? If he gets faster in the short-run, he might decide it's worth the effort.

You are not the first one to try this.
Tennis is about manipulating 2 to 4 meters of the court in a way you run as less as possible.
That is surely critical. But it doesn't negate the importance of quickness.
 
If you do nothing except the quickness drills, that is probably a true statement.

If you also balance it out with flexibility and strength training, I would disagree.

And there are plenty of opportunities for injury even if one doesn't try to get quicker.



Why should you not do a lot of coordination drills?



Why wouldn't you get quicker? That's the whole purpose of the drills.

And what does "long run" mean? If he gets faster in the short-run, he might decide it's worth the effort.



That is surely critical. But it doesn't negate the importance of quickness.

If you dont know what you are doing you will not balance it well and go for to much , and that is why risk management is crucial coz in tennis injuries are always concern.
Its better to start coordination slowly as he is not familiar with it and it can also be taxing on normal body.
You will get bit quicker quite fast at first but with very high price of diminishing returns meaning you will play slightly better with much more effort since
you will start using your speed to cover you playing mistakes, which is one of the reasons to get faster in the first place hehe.
You will play worse but move faster and faster and it will spiral until you get injured or get sick of running like crazy and results will not follow any more.
So long run is couple of months at best.
Speed has crazy high diminishing returns in tennis.
That is why 35 plus guys dominate tennis over young guys like shapovalov even tho he is insane fast.
 
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zaph

Semi-Pro
If you aren't fast in the first place, you can't get faster. What you can do is anticipate your opponents next shot better, so you are ready to move their. Plus improve your footwork, so you are ready to move instantly.

The one thing I have going for me is speed, I am short, light and can kill my momentum virtually instantly. There are very few shots I can't run down. I would trade some of that speed for more height and power. Endlessly running things down is an exhausting way to play.
 

Curious

Legend
If you aren't fast in the first place, you can't get faster. What you can do is anticipate your opponents next shot better, so you are ready to move their. Plus improve your footwork, so you are ready to move instantly.

The one thing I have going for me is speed, I am short, light and can kill my momentum virtually instantly. There are very few shots I can't run down. I would trade some of that speed for more height and power. Endlessly running things down is an exhausting way to play.
How can you say that?
We’re not talking about enlarging a nose or a penis by exercise!
 
If you aren't fast in the first place, you can't get faster.
Of course you can. Simplest for many is to lose some weight. Next up is getting more fit: how many balls do people let go because they're tired or they anticipate getting tired later and so want to conserve energy?

Working on the fast twitch muscles absolutely can make you quicker.

Working on coordination can also work wonders if one is not very coordinated [big potential gains]. This will be much more difficult to change, though.

What you can do is anticipate your opponents next shot better, so you are ready to move their. Plus improve your footwork, so you are ready to move instantly.
Both excellent suggestions.

The one thing I have going for me is speed, I am short, light and can kill my momentum virtually instantly. There are very few shots I can't run down. I would trade some of that speed for more height and power. Endlessly running things down is an exhausting way to play.
You can't change your height but you could certainly increase your power.

And look on the bright side: as exhausting as it is to play that way, think of how frustrated your opponents must get when you get yet another ball back?
 
If you dont know what you are doing you will not balance it well and go for to much , and that is why risk management is crucial coz in tennis injuries are always concern.
Its better to start coordination slowly as he is not familiar with it and it can also be taxing on normal body.
You will get bit quicker quite fast at first but with very high price of diminishing returns meaning you will play slightly better with much more effort since
you will start using your speed to cover you playing mistakes, which is one of the reasons to get faster in the first place hehe.
Diminishing returns are a problem of life; you just have to determine how much effort you're willing to put in for a certain amount of return.

You will play worse but move faster and faster and it will spiral until you get injured or get sick of running like crazy and results will not follow any more.
So long run is couple of months at best.
Speed has crazy high diminishing returns in tennis.
That is why 35 plus guys dominate tennis over young guys like shapovalov even tho he is insane fast.
I don't think the OP has to worry about the "Fed/Nole/Rafa vs everyone else" paradigm in rec league play. He wants to get faster [IMO he meant "quicker"] as a way to improve. If speed allows you to get one more ball back, I think that's very valuable at 4.0.
 

Keendog

Semi-Pro
Of course you can. Simplest for many is to lose some weight. Next up is getting more fit: how many balls do people let go because they're tired or they anticipate getting tired later and so want to conserve energy?

Working on the fast twitch muscles absolutely can make you quicker.

Working on coordination can also work wonders if one is not very coordinated [big potential gains]. This will be much more difficult to change, though.



Both excellent suggestions.



You can't change your height but you could certainly increase your power.

And look on the bright side: as exhausting as it is to play that way, think of how frustrated your opponents must get when you get yet another ball back?
Well consider the value poposition. Thing is he only has limited time to either do exercises or practice. He is ageing like all of us so will slow down regardless over time. Would he be better off spending time trying to power up his forehand or first serve so he only has to move forward to the net instead of side to side? If he invests in practice he should hold the benefit for a lifetime. If he runs around cones how much better off is he?

If he has unlimited time then it is a different matter.
 
Well consider the value poposition. Thing is he only has limited time to either do exercises or practice. He is ageing like all of us so will slow down regardless over time. Would he be better off spending time trying to power up his forehand or first serve so he only has to move forward to the net instead of side to side? If he invests in practice he should hold the benefit for a lifetime. If he runs around cones how much better off is he?

If he has unlimited time then it is a different matter.
I don't look at it as an "either/or" proposition. It's a % game: how much time and energy do you want to devote to one thing and another? I could make a counter-argument that quickness will serve [no pun intended] in many situations whereas the serve only applies 50% of the time.

Neither argument is "right" or "wrong"; how one decides depends on one's goals, potential gain, learning curve, etc. it's different for everyone.
 

Znak

Professional
@megamind I support this quest! @chic had some solid advice in doing explosive workouts. I subscribe to Matt's newsletter I recall him speaking to specific exercices in regards to this topic, his blog is offered here: http://www.mattspoint.com/blog

I would incorporate specific leg weight training exercises, agility training, sprint training and acceleration training.

Maybe @Hitman would be able to offer some sound advice with more specifics?
 

Keendog

Semi-Pro
I don't look at it as an "either/or" proposition. It's a % game: how much time and energy do you want to devote to one thing and another? I could make a counter-argument that quickness will serve [no pun intended] in many situations whereas the serve only applies 50% of the time.

Neither argument is "right" or "wrong"; how one decides depends on one's goals, potential gain, learning curve, etc. it's different for everyone.
Yes I wasn't really helping OP with his question but it is good to point out it may be more effort than it is worth.

To address OP's question, the easiest way is to lose some weight. If you are 70kgs and lose 3.5kgs, that is 5% of your body weight gone and will really speed you up. From experience I've found the easiest way to lose it is a good old fashioned bout of gastroenteritis :sick: Still, beats doing squats...
 
Diminishing returns are a problem of life; you just have to determine how much effort you're willing to put in for a certain amount of return.



I don't think the OP has to worry about the "Fed/Nole/Rafa vs everyone else" paradigm in rec league play. He wants to get faster [IMO he meant "quicker"] as a way to improve. If speed allows you to get one more ball back, I think that's very valuable at 4.0.
Diminishing returns are a problem of life; you just have to determine how much effort you're willing to put in for a certain amount of return.



I don't think the OP has to worry about the "Fed/Nole/Rafa vs everyone else" paradigm in rec league play. He wants to get faster [IMO he meant "quicker"] as a way to improve. If speed allows you to get one more ball back, I think that's very valuable at 4.0.
That is why all of us are here , we put the effort but it aint moving as well.
I can put other examples but we dont know the same people do we....
 

zaph

Semi-Pro
How can you say that?
We’re not talking about enlarging a nose or a penis by exercise!
Because professional athletes can't do it. Take footballers (soccer in American), pace is a massive asset in many positions, so why don't slow players do exercises to speed up? If athletes could add as much pace as they liked, there wouldn't be any slow players.

You're right that if a person is out of condition, carrying extra weight, they can get faster but every person has a "pace" limit.

In tennis it is more than simply how fast you can run on the court, it is how quickly you can change direction and kill your momentum. I am fast on a tennis court not because I can sprint quickly but because I am light and have a low centre of gravity. Which means I can change direction very quickly. If you haven't got those advantages, you will be slower.

In the same way that I can hit the gym to the end of time, I will never be able to match the power and serve power of bigger and taller players.
 

golden chicken

Professional
To sum up,

Work on anticipation and shot recognition so you can optimize the speed you already have.
Work out so you can increase the speed until you reach your personal limit.
Don't bother.

:-D
 

Curious

Legend
To sum up,

Work on anticipation and shot recognition so you can optimize the speed you already have.
Work out so you can increase the speed until you reach your personal limit.
Don't bother.

:-D
Can we delete the underlined part?:p
I’m worried some may stop too early thinking they’ve already reached their limit.
 

Moveforwardalways

Hall of Fame
not overweight: bmi is 21
i workout 3 times a week
Well, in that case, right now you are as fast as you will ever be. Enjoy it, and train so that you lose it more slowly than you would otherwise. Despite what people will tell you, you cannot get significantly faster. If you were overweight, losing weight would help. But that’s about it. You can get better at anticipating where the ball will go, and you can move more efficiently on the court, but your speed is likely already maxed out.
 
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