How do you know when you need a hip replacement?

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Bump!

Well, I am getting the hip replaced, soon.

Since this post, I have had some bad days with this hip. I played four doubles matches in two days at sectionals a few months ago, and it was pretty messed up afterward.

To play a match now, I have to take two Aleeve in the morning and two Tylenol before the match. This is not sustainable.

It throbs at night. I feel it on the Peloton. Ab exercises are uncomfortable.

If I walk for an hour, I’m limping a lot. I’m planning a big, outdoorsy vacation later this year, and I cannot take this bum hip with me. If I do, I will be sitting in the car when others are kayaking.

I’ll let you know how it goes. I hope I can get back to tennis. I will lose my spot on my teams, and I don’t know how I will play well enough to ever earn my way back in.
All the best on a smooth procedure and recovery. You'll be flying around the courts like Swiatek [relatively speaking]. Even Becky won't be able to get you down.
 

comeback

Hall of Fame
i had throbbing hip pain but healed it...Look up the book "Heal your Hips" on Amazon /ibay..it will help even if you must have a hip operation or post op etc
..also google/you tube "Knees over toes guy" who has a tremendous program to bulletproof your ankles, calves, knees, quads, hamstrings etc which support your hips..
 

norcal

Legend
@Cindysphinx - one of my best tennis buddies had both hips replaced and is moving and playing great. He was a life long marathoner and by his own admission he waited too long to get the hips repaired. Sounds like you're in good physical shape so I'm sure your recovery will go well and you'll be back playing tennis soon enough.
 
The onset of my hip disease was heralded by knee pain in 2020. I assumed it was related to a 2016 back injury. A year later, as the pain worsened, I visited my primary doc--an x-ray indicated the need for a new hip. At age 64, I thought it wasn't time. AS time passed, I couldn't sleep continuously and had difficulty with the most elementary activities, e.g., entering/exiting a car, bicycling, dressing, tying shoes, walking, shopping for food, etc. I tried physical Rx to no avail. I went to the orthopedic clinic and got evaluated for a new hip. I wanted badly to get it done, because I knew the recovery process was fast, compared to knee replacement. A couple weeks before the surgery date, my other hip began killing me. If the surgeon was willing to replace both at the same time, I would have shouted "yes! where do I sign?" I had the right hip done in June last year and the other in October. I was hitting balls three weeks after the first one. I was climbing stairs in two days after the second one. The only short-term problem I had was minor aching after driving for more than 90 minutes--that resolved by February when I drove from Washington state to Las Vegas over about 20 hours of highway spread over three days. Now I have as much sensation of my hips as the average 12-year-old and no threat of severe discomfort with a wrong move of the joint.

If you start getting symptoms as I described above, you waited longer than I'd ever want to wait. If you're playing tennis and chasing balls more than five feet away, you can wait.

Since and before my surgery, I've met people who had less than optimal results from their hip replacements. I don't know if my surgeon's use of the Stryker Mako robotic surgery technology made my result such a success, but if I had to have another joint replaced, I'd go back to that doctor.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
Thanks everyone!

I visited my son over the holiday. 15-20 thousand steps a day.

I think he was trying to kill me.
 
No. Long wait for this surgeon.

Alternative medicine supplements? No. I tried something ( glucosamine, chondroitin?) some time ago. Useless.
A good surgeon: worth waiting for.

supplements? Not for me—my body doesn’t respect placebos.
Physical Rx was also useless. Strengthening the muscles around a joint whose articular surfaces wore out only ensures that the bony parts grind on each other. Ouch. But. Maintaining those muscles will improve the post-surgical recovery.

I have a friend who wants to get a steroid injection before surgery, mostly because his schedule is too tight for surgery. Don’t know how well that works.
 
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Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
Man, I cannot catch a break.

I'm getting tested for covid. It has to be covid. I had it last year, so I recognize the symptoms.

If I can't shake this pretty quickly, I'll have to go to the back of the line with this doctor. And I won't have an opening in my schedule until 2023.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
Isn't there a prescription [RX] antiviral pill now available? Suppose to drop viral levels quickly and was used by our former POTUS. One of my retired MD tennis players mentioned it when he was discussing treatment options with us.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
Yeah, but there can be a rebound, which would be exactly the wrong timing. I know people who took it, felt better, then crashed and tested positive again. It’s apparently a godsend for people with risk factors, though.

Plus, talk about something that hasn’t been studied for long enough . . . .
 

LuckyR

Legend
Yeah, but there can be a rebound, which would be exactly the wrong timing. I know people who took it, felt better, then crashed and tested positive again. It’s apparently a godsend for people with risk factors, though.

Plus, talk about something that hasn’t been studied for long enough . . . .
Just so you know Paxlovid was tested on patients who were never vaccinated AND had never had Covid (not your situation). It did show a 90% lowering of severe Covid in that group. Of course it got emergency authorization to be used in high risk patients, but there is little evidence that it will significantly lower your risk of severe disease and none at all that it will shorten your course of mild symptoms. The risk of rebound is supposed to be 2%, but anecdotally it seems to be higher than that.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
The only two people I know who took it are a perfectly healthy and vaxed 35 year old woman is super afraid of Covid, and a 68 year old vaxed man. Both got rebound symptoms.

So that 100%. ;)
 

LuckyR

Legend
The only two people I know who took it are a perfectly healthy and vaxed 35 year old woman is super afraid of Covid, and a 68 year old vaxed man. Both got rebound symptoms.

So that 100%. ;)
Well the first person didn't qualify to get the drug (so her health care provider is suspect) and second did, but wasn't in the group in which research said it was helpful.
 

time_fly

Hall of Fame
Sounds like I am a little late to chime in on this. I have hip and lower back issues from a lifetime of playing sports interleaved with sitting in front of a computer for long periods. Imaging has shown disc compressions as well as narrowing of the joint spaces in the hips and the beginning of bone spurs. Lucky me. Like Cindy, I want to put off a hip replacement for as long as possible and have put a lot of work into figuring out stretching and exercise routines that minimize my problem. But I definitely had issues with chronic pain ... until recently, when I tried full-spectrum CBD oil. This has been a game changer for me. 30-40mg daily broken into two doses keeps me pain free though normal activities and, especially importantly, overnight. I do supplement with a small amount of Advil Dual Action if I am doing something particularly aggressive like playing singles or doing an intense lower body workout, but I don't need OTC pain meds regularly any more. Definitely worth trying if you are uncomfortable but not completely incapacitated with joint inflammation issues IMO.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
Sounds like I am a little late to chime in on this. I have hip and lower back issues from a lifetime of playing sports interleaved with sitting in front of a computer for long periods. Imaging has shown disc compressions as well as narrowing of the joint spaces in the hips and the beginning of bone spurs. Lucky me. Like Cindy, I want to put off a hip replacement for as long as possible and have put a lot of work into figuring out stretching and exercise routines that minimize my problem. But I definitely had issues with chronic pain ... until recently, when I tried full-spectrum CBD oil. This has been a game changer for me. 30-40mg daily broken into two doses keeps me pain free though normal activities and, especially importantly, overnight. I do supplement with a small amount of Advil Dual Action if I am doing something particularly aggressive like playing singles or doing an intense lower body workout, but I don't need OTC pain meds regularly any more. Definitely worth trying if you are uncomfortable but not completely incapacitated with joint inflammation issues IMO.
Interesting. How old are you?

I tried some cbd products some years ago. They didn’t help me much, for some reason.
 

SteveI

Legend
Sounds like I am a little late to chime in on this. I have hip and lower back issues from a lifetime of playing sports interleaved with sitting in front of a computer for long periods. Imaging has shown disc compressions as well as narrowing of the joint spaces in the hips and the beginning of bone spurs. Lucky me. Like Cindy, I want to put off a hip replacement for as long as possible and have put a lot of work into figuring out stretching and exercise routines that minimize my problem. But I definitely had issues with chronic pain ... until recently, when I tried full-spectrum CBD oil. This has been a game changer for me. 30-40mg daily broken into two doses keeps me pain free though normal activities and, especially importantly, overnight. I do supplement with a small amount of Advil Dual Action if I am doing something particularly aggressive like playing singles or doing an intense lower body workout, but I don't need OTC pain meds regularly any more. Definitely worth trying if you are uncomfortable but not completely incapacitated with joint inflammation issues IMO.
Glad you got great results. CBD did zero for me... I have used other things that have helped over the years. It is hit and miss.
 

time_fly

Hall of Fame
Interesting. How old are you?
I just turned 50, thank you for reminding me. :)

Glad you got great results. CBD did zero for me... I have used other things that have helped over the years. It is hit and miss.
CBD comes in many forms. I use full-spectrum oil derived from hemp, meaning it does contain trace amounts of THC. Not enough to get you high, but it could show up on a drug test. But since I’m not worried about drug tests and my research indicated that full spectrum oils tend to provide more pain relief, that’s what I decided to go with. To get a noticeable benefit that lasts around the clock I take about 35mg total per day sublingually (oil held under the tongue for 30 to 45 seconds before swallowing), split into two doses morning and evening.

When you first try it, most providers will recommend you start with 5 or 10mg, but that’s just to test tolerance. That amount has no effect on me. There’s research on all sorts of doses, even in the hundreds of milligrams per day, but I found a few places citing 0.2 to 0.7mg per pound of body weight, and I started with the 0.2 number.

I’m sure that even my regimen wouldn’t work for everyone or else the clinical evidence would already be more clear. But I just wanted to provide more detail about what is working for me.
 

SteveI

Legend
I just turned 50, thank you for reminding me. :)



CBD comes in many forms. I use full-spectrum oil derived from hemp, meaning it does contain trace amounts of THC. Not enough to get you high, but it could show up on a drug test. But since I’m not worried about drug tests and my research indicated that full spectrum oils tend to provide more pain relief, that’s what I decided to go with. To get a noticeable benefit that lasts around the clock I take about 35mg total per day sublingually (oil held under the tongue for 30 to 45 seconds before swallowing), split into two doses morning and evening.

When you first try it, most providers will recommend you start with 5 or 10mg, but that’s just to test tolerance. That amount has no effect on me. There’s research on all sorts of doses, even in the hundreds of milligrams per day, but I found a few places citing 0.2 to 0.7mg per pound of body weight, and I started with the 0.2 number.

I’m sure that even my regimen wouldn’t work for everyone or else the clinical evidence would already be more clear. But I just wanted to provide more detail about what is working for me.
So glad it worked for you. I did a study on myself with full-spectrum CBD also. Did quite a bit of research and worked with a highly regarded company. Thanks for all the great details.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
Who has two thumbs and a shiny new hip? This gal!

I had the hip replacement one week ago. Everything went well, and I'm recovering quickly. I used a walker the day of the surgery, and I spent one night in the hospital. I used the walker for two days at home, then cast it aside in favor of a cane. I did not even peel the plastic off of the walker.

But let me back up.

A couple of days before the surgery, the hospital called to go over instructions and suchlike. The hospital rep was delightful and very pleasant. Then she said, "OK, the last thing is we need to review your out-of-pocket responsibility. There will be a hospital facility fee, which covers everything other than the surgeons and anesthesiologists. That'll be [click, click, click] $5,450." Then she said into the stunned silence, "You'll need to bring that with you when you arrive. We take major credit cards, and we can accept cash if you prefer. We can also arrange a payment plan if that is attractive to you."

Just another silly hospital error, right? $5450 will be the whole facility fee, surely, and I will owe a copay or deductible or something. I had outpatient wrist surgery in 2020, and I think I only paid about $350 for that. A call to my insurer should take of this.

The chipper insurance rep explained that hospitalizations are 80/20, and the hospital facility fee was *$88,000.* My 20% would be $16,000, plus 20% of the surgeons and PT. Fortunately for me, I have an annual out-of-pocket maximum of $6000, so I only had to pay until I reached that point.

I did some quick math and realized that it made no sense to cancel. Unless I stepped up the quality of my insurance during Open Season in December, I would face the same $6000 in 2023. And the plans that cover more cost a lot more. I've been reaping the financial benefits of a cheap plan for 9 years, so I'm still ahead. I kept the surgery date.

Anyway, I'm glad I did this. The surgeon told my husband that the joint was in much worse shape than he would have expected based on the xrays and my activity level. Every day gets better than the last, but I think it will be at least a month before I can drive or use the Peloton.

Now if you'll excuse me, I need to go take my inaugural walk around the neighborhood and deal with all of the furrowed brows and nosy questions when my friends see me walking with a cane.
 

SteveI

Legend
Who has two thumbs and a shiny new hip? This gal!

I had the hip replacement one week ago. Everything went well, and I'm recovering quickly. I used a walker the day of the surgery, and I spent one night in the hospital. I used the walker for two days at home, then cast it aside in favor of a cane. I did not even peel the plastic off of the walker.

But let me back up.

A couple of days before the surgery, the hospital called to go over instructions and suchlike. The hospital rep was delightful and very pleasant. Then she said, "OK, the last thing is we need to review your out-of-pocket responsibility. There will be a hospital facility fee, which covers everything other than the surgeons and anesthesiologists. That'll be [click, click, click] $5,450." Then she said into the stunned silence, "You'll need to bring that with you when you arrive. We take major credit cards, and we can accept cash if you prefer. We can also arrange a payment plan if that is attractive to you."

Just another silly hospital error, right? $5450 will be the whole facility fee, surely, and I will owe a copay or deductible or something. I had outpatient wrist surgery in 2020, and I think I only paid about $350 for that. A call to my insurer should take of this.

The chipper insurance rep explained that hospitalizations are 80/20, and the hospital facility fee was *$88,000.* My 20% would be $16,000, plus 20% of the surgeons and PT. Fortunately for me, I have an annual out-of-pocket maximum of $6000, so I only had to pay until I reached that point.

I did some quick math and realized that it made no sense to cancel. Unless I stepped up the quality of my insurance during Open Season in December, I would face the same $6000 in 2023. And the plans that cover more cost a lot more. I've been reaping the financial benefits of a cheap plan for 9 years, so I'm still ahead. I kept the surgery date.

Anyway, I'm glad I did this. The surgeon told my husband that the joint was in much worse shape than he would have expected based on the xrays and my activity level. Every day gets better than the last, but I think it will be at least a month before I can drive or use the Peloton.

Now if you'll excuse me, I need to go take my inaugural walk around the neighborhood and deal with all of the furrowed brows and nosy questions when my friends see me walking with a cane.
Thanks for sharing. Playing the insurance game is a skill and an art form. Good luck in your recovery.
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Who has two thumbs and a shiny new hip? This gal!

I had the hip replacement one week ago. Everything went well, and I'm recovering quickly. I used a walker the day of the surgery, and I spent one night in the hospital. I used the walker for two days at home, then cast it aside in favor of a cane. I did not even peel the plastic off of the walker.

But let me back up.

A couple of days before the surgery, the hospital called to go over instructions and suchlike. The hospital rep was delightful and very pleasant. Then she said, "OK, the last thing is we need to review your out-of-pocket responsibility. There will be a hospital facility fee, which covers everything other than the surgeons and anesthesiologists. That'll be [click, click, click] $5,450." Then she said into the stunned silence, "You'll need to bring that with you when you arrive. We take major credit cards, and we can accept cash if you prefer. We can also arrange a payment plan if that is attractive to you."

Just another silly hospital error, right? $5450 will be the whole facility fee, surely, and I will owe a copay or deductible or something. I had outpatient wrist surgery in 2020, and I think I only paid about $350 for that. A call to my insurer should take of this.

The chipper insurance rep explained that hospitalizations are 80/20, and the hospital facility fee was *$88,000.* My 20% would be $16,000, plus 20% of the surgeons and PT. Fortunately for me, I have an annual out-of-pocket maximum of $6000, so I only had to pay until I reached that point.

I did some quick math and realized that it made no sense to cancel. Unless I stepped up the quality of my insurance during Open Season in December, I would face the same $6000 in 2023. And the plans that cover more cost a lot more. I've been reaping the financial benefits of a cheap plan for 9 years, so I'm still ahead. I kept the surgery date.

Anyway, I'm glad I did this. The surgeon told my husband that the joint was in much worse shape than he would have expected based on the xrays and my activity level. Every day gets better than the last, but I think it will be at least a month before I can drive or use the Peloton.

Now if you'll excuse me, I need to go take my inaugural walk around the neighborhood and deal with all of the furrowed brows and nosy questions when my friends see me walking with a cane.
Stick with the rehab [you seem like the type that will] and enjoy your new hip!
 
I would've gladly paid $6,000 to have each hip replaced. (I hurt that badly before surgery and I felt that good after)

Feels great not hurting with the simplest motion, huh? I'm glad you had a good outcome.
 

LuckyR

Legend
Who has two thumbs and a shiny new hip? This gal!

I had the hip replacement one week ago. Everything went well, and I'm recovering quickly. I used a walker the day of the surgery, and I spent one night in the hospital. I used the walker for two days at home, then cast it aside in favor of a cane. I did not even peel the plastic off of the walker.

But let me back up.

A couple of days before the surgery, the hospital called to go over instructions and suchlike. The hospital rep was delightful and very pleasant. Then she said, "OK, the last thing is we need to review your out-of-pocket responsibility. There will be a hospital facility fee, which covers everything other than the surgeons and anesthesiologists. That'll be [click, click, click] $5,450." Then she said into the stunned silence, "You'll need to bring that with you when you arrive. We take major credit cards, and we can accept cash if you prefer. We can also arrange a payment plan if that is attractive to you."

Just another silly hospital error, right? $5450 will be the whole facility fee, surely, and I will owe a copay or deductible or something. I had outpatient wrist surgery in 2020, and I think I only paid about $350 for that. A call to my insurer should take of this.

The chipper insurance rep explained that hospitalizations are 80/20, and the hospital facility fee was *$88,000.* My 20% would be $16,000, plus 20% of the surgeons and PT. Fortunately for me, I have an annual out-of-pocket maximum of $6000, so I only had to pay until I reached that point.

I did some quick math and realized that it made no sense to cancel. Unless I stepped up the quality of my insurance during Open Season in December, I would face the same $6000 in 2023. And the plans that cover more cost a lot more. I've been reaping the financial benefits of a cheap plan for 9 years, so I'm still ahead. I kept the surgery date.

Anyway, I'm glad I did this. The surgeon told my husband that the joint was in much worse shape than he would have expected based on the xrays and my activity level. Every day gets better than the last, but I think it will be at least a month before I can drive or use the Peloton.

Now if you'll excuse me, I need to go take my inaugural walk around the neighborhood and deal with all of the furrowed brows and nosy questions when my friends see me walking with a cane.
I didn't get your final take on the $5k cost.
 

antony

Hall of Fame
Who has two thumbs and a shiny new hip? This gal!

I had the hip replacement one week ago. Everything went well, and I'm recovering quickly. I used a walker the day of the surgery, and I spent one night in the hospital. I used the walker for two days at home, then cast it aside in favor of a cane. I did not even peel the plastic off of the walker.

But let me back up.

A couple of days before the surgery, the hospital called to go over instructions and suchlike. The hospital rep was delightful and very pleasant. Then she said, "OK, the last thing is we need to review your out-of-pocket responsibility. There will be a hospital facility fee, which covers everything other than the surgeons and anesthesiologists. That'll be [click, click, click] $5,450." Then she said into the stunned silence, "You'll need to bring that with you when you arrive. We take major credit cards, and we can accept cash if you prefer. We can also arrange a payment plan if that is attractive to you."

Just another silly hospital error, right? $5450 will be the whole facility fee, surely, and I will owe a copay or deductible or something. I had outpatient wrist surgery in 2020, and I think I only paid about $350 for that. A call to my insurer should take of this.

The chipper insurance rep explained that hospitalizations are 80/20, and the hospital facility fee was *$88,000.* My 20% would be $16,000, plus 20% of the surgeons and PT. Fortunately for me, I have an annual out-of-pocket maximum of $6000, so I only had to pay until I reached that point.

I did some quick math and realized that it made no sense to cancel. Unless I stepped up the quality of my insurance during Open Season in December, I would face the same $6000 in 2023. And the plans that cover more cost a lot more. I've been reaping the financial benefits of a cheap plan for 9 years, so I'm still ahead. I kept the surgery date.

Anyway, I'm glad I did this. The surgeon told my husband that the joint was in much worse shape than he would have expected based on the xrays and my activity level. Every day gets better than the last, but I think it will be at least a month before I can drive or use the Peloton.

Now if you'll excuse me, I need to go take my inaugural walk around the neighborhood and deal with all of the furrowed brows and nosy questions when my friends see me walking with a cane.
Those hospital fees seem egregious. Sounds like what you get when government meddles with healthcare. The average cost of a 3-day hospital stay is supposedly "only" $30,000, apparently, according to Google.
 

LOBALOT

Hall of Fame
I am worried I am next up for this. For the last 2 months I have been unable to sleep with achy pain from my hips. It is in an odd spot I would describe as at the upper part of my rear end centered around the spine. I toss from one side to the other to my back to the other over and over.... I have been previously diagnosed with severe arthritis in both hips and have arthritis in my back and neck.... basically arthritis everywhere.... gosh I am getting old!

The other evening I popped 2 Naproxen horse pills a few hours before I slept and got a decent nights sleep but shouldn't have to take pain meds to sleep at night.
 
I am worried I am next up for this. For the last 2 months I have been unable to sleep with achy pain from my hips. It is in an odd spot I would describe as at the upper part of my rear end centered around the spine. I toss from one side to the other to my back to the other over and over.... I have been previously diagnosed with severe arthritis in both hips and have arthritis in my back and neck.... basically arthritis everywhere.... gosh I am getting old!

The other evening I popped 2 Naproxen horse pills a few hours before I slept and got a decent nights sleep but shouldn't have to take pain meds to sleep at night.
It's time. The recovery for most is very easy. Many can be done at a surgery center (mine), whose schedule COVID seems not to affect--home the same day. I wish I had my evaluation with an orthopedic surgeon right after my diagnosis, because in the time that elapsed before I made the appointment my condition steadily deteriorated--though if it didn't progress as it did, I wouldn't have been so grateful for the procedure. I was popping Naproxen and tylenol around the clock. Now, I take nothing.

Your mileage may vary.

PS. In a prior post, I said my surgeon used the Stryker Mako robotic system. It might have given me a better outcome than without--I've met several people who had suboptimal results with their replacements. The system helps assure size, orientation and proper depth of site preparation. Here's just one YouTube video--search using Stryker Mako hip in the search field. [video is age restricted and only available on YouTube] Stop watching after 3 minutes if surgery videos make you queasy.

PPS. Surgeons have different approaches to the procedure--Google for more information in addition to this Link
 
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Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
I am worried I am next up for this. For the last 2 months I have been unable to sleep with achy pain from my hips. It is in an odd spot I would describe as at the upper part of my rear end centered around the spine. I toss from one side to the other to my back to the other over and over.... I have been previously diagnosed with severe arthritis in both hips and have arthritis in my back and neck.... basically arthritis everywhere.... gosh I am getting old!

The other evening I popped 2 Naproxen horse pills a few hours before I slept and got a decent nights sleep but shouldn't have to take pain meds to sleep at night.
I'm sorry to hear you're going through this. For me, the breaking point was having an aching hip all night. And having the hip ache while at rest was pretty alarming. Depending on what kind of work you do, it is just kind of scary when you don't trust a knee, ankle, or hip. You're sitting in the meeting, everyone gets up to leave, and you're not sure you can take that first step.

I got lots of solicited and unsolicited advice from various people who had been through it, so here are the highlights:

1. There was a big split between those who advocated the anterior approach or a robotic approach versus those who advocated lateral/posterior approach. The anterior people praised the easy recovery. Personally, the most important thing for me was that the surgery give me the best possible result, and I didn't want anyone practicing their anterior or robotic skills on me. The learning curve for those things can be quite steep; someone is being a guinea pig and it wasn't going to be me. I think I mentioned that my surgeon fixes a lot of botched anterior hip replacements, and he straight up refuses to use that method.

2. Pick your surgeon and get a baseline appointment now, well before you need it. For any top surgeon, it will take months to get that first appointment, then to get on the surgical schedule when you decide to move forward. In my case, things deteriorated very quickly, and you can only tolerate the NSAIDs until you can't.

3. Plan for this. Find a slot in your work schedule when you can get the surgery. For me, it is the right hip, so that is six weeks of no driving. You'll need your family to help you, so you have to consider their schedules too.

4. Check your insurance coverage. Many people need both hips done. I don't, but if I did I would definitely need them done in the same year for insurance reasons.

5. Consider practical things. I was told that summer is better than winter. It takes me 20 minutes to use devices to put on socks and shoes, so I just go barefoot. Winter means bundling up and ice, and there is a lot of walking in the rehab. If your insurance is stingy, get your own walker and cane so you're not paying hospital prices. I imagine these things are readily available for a few bucks.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
Those hospital fees seem egregious. Sounds like what you get when government meddles with healthcare. The average cost of a 3-day hospital stay is supposedly "only" $30,000, apparently, according to Google.
I am still gobsmacked about the cost. I cannot understand it at all.

We're talking about showing up at the hospital early on a Tuesday, and leaving on Wednesday afternoon. One hour for the operation itself. How is that $88,000?

Because I was aware of the cost, I perhaps paid more attention to everything they did, just kind of like watching the taxi meter running. There were some odd things that felt to me a little unnecessary.

For example, the IV line. In my experience, they do a blood draw, and then they use that line as your IV line. One stick. This is how it has been since way back when I had my kids. This time, they ran a second IV line. The explanation was that they like to have a second one in case they have to administer meds in an emergency, in case the first one clogs and they can't clear it. For the medical pros out there, is this normal for a low-risk patient? I feel gaslit.

Another example. They mailed me packets of sterilizing wipes. I was supposed to shower the night before, then use these wipes in a specific order to wipe my whole body. Then I was to shower again before going to the hospital -- where they presented me with another set of sterilizing wipes. It's just wipes, I guess, so maybe the cost isn't that great. But my googling tells me there isn't convincing evidence that using these wipes reduces infection.

And . . . I think it was a teaching hospital. I sure hope so, given how I had two surgeons and three anesthesiologist and two cheerful med students who seemed quite stoked to be there.

I will definitely be scrutinizing that bill once I get it.
 

basil J

Hall of Fame
Glad to hear you are doing well. I am 61, very fit and active and got my right hip replaced 2 years ago in July. I have resumed all prior activities with no pain. I was on my Peloton day 5 post-surgery riding at 2- minute then 5 minute and eventually 10-minute intervals with no resistance. Prior to the surgery I had terrible pain in my right groin and would have throbbing pain in my hip all night. When it became unbearable and I could not even play Dubs any more I made the decision, and I am so glad I did. I worry about wearing it out and need to slow down on my activities a bit. I lift 3 days a week. play singles 3 days a week and Bike on the weekends (about 20 miles per ride) and I never give my hip a thought. The only activity I have given up is running because my surgeon told me, outside of sprint work, long distance running will wear out the joint over time. My ability to jump has also diminished so I play very little basketball, but otherwise It was a good decision.
 
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LuckyR

Legend
I am still gobsmacked about the cost. I cannot understand it at all.

We're talking about showing up at the hospital early on a Tuesday, and leaving on Wednesday afternoon. One hour for the operation itself. How is that $88,000?

Because I was aware of the cost, I perhaps paid more attention to everything they did, just kind of like watching the taxi meter running. There were some odd things that felt to me a little unnecessary.

For example, the IV line. In my experience, they do a blood draw, and then they use that line as your IV line. One stick. This is how it has been since way back when I had my kids. This time, they ran a second IV line. The explanation was that they like to have a second one in case they have to administer meds in an emergency, in case the first one clogs and they can't clear it. For the medical pros out there, is this normal for a low-risk patient? I feel gaslit.

Another example. They mailed me packets of sterilizing wipes. I was supposed to shower the night before, then use these wipes in a specific order to wipe my whole body. Then I was to shower again before going to the hospital -- where they presented me with another set of sterilizing wipes. It's just wipes, I guess, so maybe the cost isn't that great. But my googling tells me there isn't convincing evidence that using these wipes reduces infection.

And . . . I think it was a teaching hospital. I sure hope so, given how I had two surgeons and three anesthesiologist and two cheerful med students who seemed quite stoked to be there.

I will definitely be scrutinizing that bill once I get it.
Gobsmacked eh? Where else do you pay 5k for a $88,000 service?

With your 6k limit it doesn't matter (cost wise to you) whether it cost $30,000 or a million, it's still $6000 out of pocket. Or to put it another way, scrutinizing your bill isn't going to matter unless you can find $58,000+ worth of errors (and it would only be 20% to you of any errors above the first $58k).

I'd concentrate on my rehab and consider it a win.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
Well, I do understand math.

But I doubt the insurer will pay $88k.

What if they pay the hospital $20k? Then my share is $4000, more or less.
 

Cindysphinx

G.O.A.T.
@Cindysphinx , my bro and a lifelong friend both got total hips around age 63 and 61 respectively. One was DIII college tennis team captain, the other was a weak #6 D1 FSB player. They are now, once again, happy tennis players. Just keep plugging on through rehab.
Dude, the rehab is going to be a special kind of hell. So far, it is worse than the surgery.

Like, I had the second PT visit today, so the first “real one.” The first visit is mostly an assessment, and you get homework exercises, which I did.

Today, though. It was brutal. Eight minutes on the recumbent bike. Rising straight up from a chair with arms across chest, with resistance band on knees. Sidestepping with resistance band. One legged calf raises. For starters.

And one exercise I was shocked I couldn’t do. The exercise that broke me was to lie flat on my back and just lift my straight leg off the table. Nothing happened.

How I will be ready for tennis anytime soon is a mystery.
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Dude, the rehab is going to be a special kind of hell. So far, it is worse than the surgery.

Like, I had the second PT visit today, so the first “real one.” The first visit is mostly an assessment, and you get homework exercises, which I did.

Today, though. It was brutal. Eight minutes on the recumbent bike. Rising straight up from a chair with arms across chest, with resistance band on knees. Sidestepping with resistance band. One legged calf raises. For starters.

And one exercise I was shocked I couldn’t do. The exercise that broke me was to lie flat on my back and just lift my straight leg off the table. Nothing happened.

How I will be ready for tennis anytime soon is a mystery.
Did you ever think you'd make it to 4.0? And if you did, did you think it was going to be easy? Or did you either A) think it was beyond your ability; or B) was so far away it wasn't worth thinking about?

But you made it, right? With focused effort, a good support system, perhaps a little luck, but with a lot of persistence.

Your rehab won't be any different. Again, remember to focus on the process, not the result. You'll get that exercise when your body is ready. And then you'll be able to do it twice. Then thrice. etc. You know how the story ends: you're flying through your workout and feel better than ever.

PTs are great at isolating the problem areas, which, incidentally, makes us feel inadequate. But all of those other exercises are paying off, perhaps without you even realizing it...yet.

Stay the course.
 

SteveI

Legend
Dude, the rehab is going to be a special kind of hell. So far, it is worse than the surgery.

Like, I had the second PT visit today, so the first “real one.” The first visit is mostly an assessment, and you get homework exercises, which I did.

Today, though. It was brutal. Eight minutes on the recumbent bike. Rising straight up from a chair with arms across chest, with resistance band on knees. Sidestepping with resistance band. One legged calf raises. For starters.

And one exercise I was shocked I couldn’t do. The exercise that broke me was to lie flat on my back and just lift my straight leg off the table. Nothing happened.

How I will be ready for tennis anytime soon is a mystery.
Everyone recovers differently. Stay positive when possible. I have recovered from two knee repairs. I have been in the PT clinic for many hours. Staying positive was hard for me.. but key in my recovery. I am at that age where I know many folks with hip and knee replacements.. sorry to say. No one is the same.

I hope you have a super great outcome. Keep the faith!
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
Those hospital fees seem egregious. Sounds like what you get when government meddles with healthcare. The average cost of a 3-day hospital stay is supposedly "only" $30,000, apparently, according to Google.
No it is much worse when government does not meddle. Then they will not entertain any complaints either. The horror stories before Obamacare used to be shocking. It is far better now. Hospitals, doctors and surgeons in the US have shown for decades that their basic motive is to make as much profit as possible. Only the gullible ideologically brainwashed believe their propaganda about great service etc. I get the AARP magazine and I can assure you no senior who recounts a story there has anything good to say about the costs. See the opposition to drug price negotiations for Medicare prescription prices by lobbying. The people who think privatization in the US health care works are young politically brainwashed people believing that "free enterprise" works in this field and the older ones who are rich enough not to care about it and want the inequality to spread more. The actually affected seniors know exactly how it is. Some even take medical tourism packages to Thailand, India and Mexico for hip replacement if they fall into the not too poor category. Some veterans are in a real bad condition due to health care costs and the system does not care about them even while shouting about patriotism every other minute.

The costs are blown up and most of it is deflected to employer insurance or Medicare. The really poor will not pay anything.

The only solution is Medicare for All. But as long as people are brainwashed about "innovation" and 'R&D" and the "best treatment in the world" the average senior citizen is going to suffer and then the next generation and so on.
 
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antony

Hall of Fame
No it is much worse when government does not meddle. Then they will not entertain any complaints either. The horror stories before Obamacare used to be shocking. It is far better now. Hospitals, doctors and surgeons in the US have shown for decades that their basic motive is to make as much profit as possible. Only the gullible ideologically brainwashed believe their propaganda about great service etc. I get the AARP magazine and I can assure you no senior who recounts a story there has anything good to say about the costs. See the opposition to drug price negotiations for Medicare prescription prices by lobbying. The people who think privatization in the US health care works are young politically brainwashed people believing that "free enterprise" works in this field and the older ones who are rich enough not to care about it and want the inequality to spread more. The actually affected seniors know exactly how it is. Some even take medical tourism packages to Thailand, India and Mexico for hip replacement if they fall into the not too poor category. Some veterans are in a real bad condition due to health care costs and the system does not care about them even while shouting about patriotism every other minute.

The costs are blown up and most of it is deflected to employer insurance or Medicare. The really poor will not pay anything.

The only solution is Medicare for All. But as long as people are brainwashed about "innovation" and 'R&D" and the "best treatment in the world" the average senior citizen is going to suffer and then the next generation and so on.
“The really poor will really not pay anything”
Not only does that mean that their costs will just be passed along to everyone else, they along with everyone else will end up getting worse care for more dollars.


 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
“The really poor will really not pay anything”
Not only does that mean that their costs will just be passed along to everyone else, they along with everyone else will end up getting worse care for more dollars.


Yes.
 

LuckyR

Legend
No it is much worse when government does not meddle. Then they will not entertain any complaints either. The horror stories before Obamacare used to be shocking. It is far better now. Hospitals, doctors and surgeons in the US have shown for decades that their basic motive is to make as much profit as possible. Only the gullible ideologically brainwashed believe their propaganda about great service etc. I get the AARP magazine and I can assure you no senior who recounts a story there has anything good to say about the costs. See the opposition to drug price negotiations for Medicare prescription prices by lobbying. The people who think privatization in the US health care works are young politically brainwashed people believing that "free enterprise" works in this field and the older ones who are rich enough not to care about it and want the inequality to spread more. The actually affected seniors know exactly how it is. Some even take medical tourism packages to Thailand, India and Mexico for hip replacement if they fall into the not too poor category. Some veterans are in a real bad condition due to health care costs and the system does not care about them even while shouting about patriotism every other minute.

The costs are blown up and most of it is deflected to employer insurance or Medicare. The really poor will not pay anything.

The only solution is Medicare for All. But as long as people are brainwashed about "innovation" and 'R&D" and the "best treatment in the world" the average senior citizen is going to suffer and then the next generation and so on.
It is true that many, if not most confuse excellent practice of medicine with excellent delivery of services, when they are two completely separate things.
 

zaskar1

Semi-Pro
CS
i think if you are not in a lot of pain, just the normal body aches that go away the next day or so, i would not do anything.
if you have chronic pain that affects your lifestyle, perhaps you should consider a hip replacement, but i would exhaust all other
possiblities first.
that being said
most people that i know who had hip replacements had extreme pain, just from walking around or climbing stairs. they said that after the hip replacement, their lifestyle improved quite a bit.
z
 
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