How do you listen to music in your car?

How do you listen to music in your car?

  • CD

    Votes: 3 18.8%
  • Satellite Radio

    Votes: 5 31.3%
  • Phone/MP3 player Bluetooth

    Votes: 4 25.0%
  • Phone/MP3 player USB

    Votes: 1 6.3%
  • Phone/MP3 player AUX

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • USB stick

    Votes: 1 6.3%
  • AM/FM Radio

    Votes: 2 12.5%
  • Other

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    16

NonP

Hall of Fame
Mostly via Bluetooth from my phone (both MP3 and streaming), though I listen to good old-fashioned radio every now and then. But that's because, like the OP said, the CD player is an optional luxury these days (my 2018 Honda Fit doesn't carry one). As one of the remaining dinosaurs that still buy and listen to CDs I miss those days when I could check out my latest purchase in my car so I could cut back on my ever-growing to-do/listen list at home. An isolated hour or two may not sound like much, but they do add up.
 

Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.
Depends on how hard the fan speed is going. Faster, more background noise. Only my RRS is pretty silent on 95+ degree days!

I use Amazon Prime and Google Music exclusively. No politics, no commercials!
 
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Rattler

Hall of Fame
USB with phone, either from my own extensive library, streaming or podcasts...terrestrial radio and SAT radio...my truck is new and it came with a free year of SAT radio
 
Cassette player huh? I'm not ready for that newfangled stuff. I much prefer old school. Thinking about retrofitting my 2018 EV with an 8-track player and a Victrola. Or if I can find one on €bay, I might install one of these:
Toyota was putting cassette players in their corolla models even after Y2K. Typical car industry stuff.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
Toyota was putting cassette players in their corolla models even after Y2K. Typical car industry stuff.
Last car I had with a cassette player was a 94 Volvo. Stopped driving that vehicle nearly six years ago when I started leasing EVs. Guess I missed the phase where cars had built-in CD players.
 

dahcovixx

Professional
Just curious how everyone consumes music in their cars now that CD players have pretty much been ditched by car makers.
Usb stick, i dl music and put it on there (usually bassdrive mixes). Not sure my stereo has bluetooth. Dont really wanna use phone much while driving.

I do have a big bluetooth speaker on the back porch i use with my phone (its loaded) and nvidia shield
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
@mixtape
Good riddance to CD garbage. Cassettes were much cooler.

Maybe cooler but, overall, sound quality of CDs are considerably better. And DVDs often have even higher quality sound than audio CDs. Forget about streaming... lower quality than CDs overall.

The pre-recorded cassettes, particularly, were often of rather poor quality, both mechanically & sonically. Sound quality degraded even further when tapes were left in the car as many of us would do.

I usually bought high-end tapes from Maxell and TDK; sometimes BASF or Fuji. I recorded most of my stuff on a high-quality Nakamichi tape deck. Got a better frequency response range and dynamic range with this tape deck and high-end tapes. Less background tape noise as well. But they still didn't match the quality of vinyl (or even mediocre CDs).
 
I agree!

Currently listening via bluetooth, but I have hooked up a walkman via the aux port and it's a nice drive down nostalgia road.
Hehe, nice avatar.
Maybe cooler but, overall, sound quality of CDs are considerably better. And DVDs often have even higher quality sound than audio CDs. Forget about streaming... lower quality than CDs overall.

The pre-recorded cassettes, particularly, were often of rather poor quality, both mechanically & sonically. Sound quality degraded even further when tapes were left in the car as many of us would do.

I usually bought high-end tapes from Maxell and TDK; sometimes BASF or Fuji. I recorded most of my stuff on a high-quality Nakamichi tape deck. Got a better frequency response range and dynamic range with this tape deck and high-end tapes. Less background tape noise as well. But they still didn't match the quality of vinyl (or even mediocre CDs).
Whatever. CD sound is more clear (not only sound quality) but I worship my cassette collection while CD's are just rotting junk in the basement. I listened to punk and hc as a teen and that genre wasn't even available for buying in the record stores here. Only way was to record it from someone else or to buy the original abroad. Then there's whole thing of carefully writing song lists on the covers, stacking them, etc. And the design of a cassette just blows the cd out of the water.
 
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NonP

Hall of Fame
@mixtape

Maybe cooler but, overall, sound quality of CDs are considerably better. And DVDs often have even higher quality sound than audio CDs. Forget about streaming... lower quality than CDs overall.

The pre-recorded cassettes, particularly, were often of rather poor quality, both mechanically & sonically. Sound quality degraded even further when tapes were left in the car as many of us would do.

I usually bought high-end tapes from Maxell and TDK; sometimes BASF or Fuji. I recorded most of my stuff on a high-quality Nakamichi tape deck. Got a better frequency response range and dynamic range with this tape deck and high-end tapes. Less background tape noise as well. But they still didn't match the quality of vinyl (or even mediocre CDs).
Even as a non-audiophile I can see why oldies/retros say LPs produce better sound than CDs, but yeah it's really no contest between CDs and cassettes. Not to mention the former are more durable, convenient, etc.

That said this really is a generation thing. I'd probably be sticking up for tapes had I been born about 10 yrs earlier, OTOH I'd possibly scoff at the hopelessly dated CDs were I a (very) young millennial/Gen Zer. I'm kinda fortunate to be old enough to have been there during the peak of all the major physical and digital formats (save LPs which, as you may know, are enjoying something of a renaissance these days) - I've even got a MiniDisc player! - and it'll be interesting to see if streaming will indeed render the very notion of media storage obsolete.

Still think CDs are the best for serious collectors, though. ;)
 

BarNotchky

Semi-Pro
Thanks to all that took the poll. I posted it hoping to get ideas for my next vehicle. I've been a CD guy for years and have amassed quite a large collection. Unfortunately this collection will do me no good in my next car. Most of my drive time is spent listening to these CDs. My car in many ways is my fortress of solitude and a big part of my solitude is music.
 

Firstservingman

Talk Tennis Guru
either trusty old 3.5 aux with spotify or this bluetooth receiver thing that is honestly garbage and i never use that and only use the aux
 

dahcovixx

Professional
Thanks to all that took the poll. I posted it hoping to get ideas for my next vehicle. I've been a CD guy for years and have amassed quite a large collection. Unfortunately this collection will do me no good in my next car. Most of my drive time is spent listening to these CDs. My car in many ways is my fortress of solitude and a big part of my solitude is music.
Rip your cd's and put onto a usb stick. Will also have a backup on your computer. I use like a 4gig stick, too big and its hard to navigate

"Typically 16 GB storage is equivalent to 16384 MB. One MP3 song is usually between 3-5 MB, so if we do the math then a 16 GB flash card can usually store upto approximately around 3277 songs, if they are assumed to be of 5 MB each. However songs stored in wma format take up less space comparatively. "
 

BarNotchky

Semi-Pro
Rip your cd's and put onto a usb stick. Will also have a backup on your computer. I use like a 4gig stick, too big and its hard to navigate

"Typically 16 GB storage is equivalent to 16384 MB. One MP3 song is usually between 3-5 MB, so if we do the math then a 16 GB flash card can usually store upto approximately around 3277 songs, if they are assumed to be of 5 MB each. However songs stored in wma format take up less space comparatively. "
Thanks for the good advice, new Chad. This is my preferred way actually. Seems like the least painful way to migrate away from the old technology.

Unfortunately strong corporate forces want to push you towards doing everything through your phone. But I fear once you give in they own you and then you have to ride the endless software update, advertising annoyances, and generally play by their rules cycle that they just love to foster.

Ripping mp3's to a stick is easy enough. Just have to be sure the car's head unit has even a basic mp3 player capability. I haven't yet found a good source of information of specific capabilities/limitations of factory units. If you know where to find such info please pass along.
 

dahcovixx

Professional
Thanks for the good advice, new Chad. This is my preferred way actually. Seems like the least painful way to migrate away from the old technology.

Unfortunately strong corporate forces want to push you towards doing everything through your phone. But I fear once you give in they own you and then you have to ride the endless software update, advertising annoyances, and generally play by their rules cycle that they just love to foster.

Ripping mp3's to a stick is easy enough. Just have to be sure the car's head unit has even a basic mp3 player capability. I haven't yet found a good source of information of specific capabilities/limitations of factory units. If you know where to find such info please pass along.
I have one similar to this. They have one with bluetooth, but you lose your cd.



I used to use alpine when i was doing car audio, doesnt really matter now. But this looks like a decent unit

 

Blade0324

Hall of Fame
Radio Radio and Radio. Takes too long and is too much hassle to get the phone going in the car for the very short drives I take regularly. I seldom drive longer than about 15 minutes and it's not worth it to get anything else going besides the radio. I pretty much only listen to two stations too.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Radio Radio and Radio. Takes too long and is too much hassle to get the phone going in the car for the very short drives I take regularly. I seldom drive longer than about 15 minutes and it's not worth it to get anything else going besides the radio. I pretty much only listen to two stations too.
My phone is playing on the car system in about ten seconds from starting the car and comes on automatically.
 
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