How far did you get in MATH ???

sureshs

Bionic Poster
In mathematics, usually infinity is not something big, but something small. Not infinitely big, but infinitely small. Infinite in details. Like a circle is a polygon with an "infinite" number of facets. 2 is infinitely sharp.

It can be big or small
 

Pheasant

Legend
I have a B.A. in Applied Mathematics. Off the top of my head, I completed 7 quarters of Calculus(differential and integral calc, couple quarters of multivariable calc, theory of calc, advanced calc), a quarter of Ordinary Differential Equations, 2 quarters of Partial Differential Equations, a quarter of non-Euclidian Geometry, Complex Variables. I also had Abstract Algebra and Linear Algebra(proof course)....this was 30 years ago. Unfortunately, I have forgotten about 80% of what I learned.

When I tutored my nephew in differential calculus, I had to go online first to brush up, then teach him. This was quite depressing, considering that I aced this in high school without trying that hard.

My brain doesn't process info nearly as quickly as it did 30+ years ago. This is perhaps the worst part of again, IMHO. Thankfully, I am healthy. Things could be a lot worse.
 

Sudacafan

Bionic Poster
In mathematics, usually infinity is not something big, but something small. Not infinitely big, but infinitely small. Infinite in details. Like a circle is a polygon with an "infinite" number of facets. 2 is infinitely sharp.
I believe that infinite is something very big, either positive or negative number.
When it's something very small (close to zero), it is an infinitesimal. Or something like that.
This is my scientific approach, I remember from my school days.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
I believe that infinite is something very big, either positive or negative number.
When it's something very small (close to zero), it is an infinitesimal. Or something like that.
This is my scientific approach, I remember from my school days.

That is all right. The bigger (pardon the pun) question is whether there is truly anything infinite in the Multiverse or is it all finitely countable, however big?
 

Pheasant

Legend
Infinity was addressed in Calc III regarding limits. For example x/0 is infinity 1/X as X approaches infinity=0.

The summation series 1/2 + 1/(2^2) + 1/(2^3)+....... +1/(2^x) as x approaches infinity is 1. This is why the professor said that we can reach 1. Without limits, you couldn't get there. He said put it this way...before you walk a meter, you have to first walk 1/2 a meter. But before you walk a 1/2 meter, you have to first walk half of that distance. This could go on infinitely. Thus, the summation series defined travel.
 

Pheasant

Legend
I've heard that scientists have estimated that the amount of atoms in the universe is 10^90th power. With that being said, why do numbers like googol and particularly, a googolplex(10^Googol) even exist? I guess somebody got bored and started creating these ridiculously huge numbers.
 

max

Legend
I only went to calculus at the college level. My claim to fame with math is that I served as a math tutor in college.

I found that for me, it was a matter of how I viewed math that made a real difference: if I thought it was some exotic, unattainable subject, then I would freak working it. IF, however, I told myself that with a bit of patience I could master stuff, then I found I could.

ONE thing I realize now is that, unlike many other subjects, the NEAT thing about math is that there are answers. . . if you put in the work, you find the answers. Some academic subjects don't have this great promise.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Bionic Poster
Just in case, please we should not discuss anymore about:
48÷2(9+3) = 288
I consider it a finalized business, OK?

My answer is different. I divided both sides by 0 and get as an answer.

I already heard about that. Pythagoras? What’s your take?

Did Pythagoras beat me to it? I've tried to count the number of sides on a circle. The number after "many" is "infinity". So my count goes: "One, Two, Many, Infinity".

There you have it.
 

Azure

G.O.A.T.
I've heard that scientists have estimated that the amount of atoms in the universe is 10^90th power. With that being said, why do numbers like googol and particularly, a googolplex(10^Googol) even exist? I guess somebody got bored and started creating these ridiculously huge numbers.
With data becoming bigger and bigger, these numbers might actually be useful sooner than we know! Besides, Google got the name for their company from Googol :)
 

Pheasant

Legend
@Pheasant


How about @LGQ7's idea that a circle is a polygon with an infinite # of sides?


This is Archimedes’ theory from over 2000 years ago. The theory might even be older than that. Archimedes was the first one to calculate pi to several places by using polygons. He cleverly inscribed a hexagon inside the circle, then circumscribed a hexagon outside the circle. From there, he took the circumference and divided it by the diameter for both hexagons. He used the average to get pi. Pi=circumference divided by diameter.

He found out that the more sides the polygon had for this method, the closer you got to pi. He ran this with polygons with 96 sides. Can you imagine how long that took 2 thousand years ago to write all of this down?

Nowadays, we have powerful computers that can run this same method for polygons with thousands of sides.

Archimedes, for all intents and purposes, proved that a polygon with an infinite amount of sides is indeed a circle.
 

Sudacafan

Bionic Poster
This is Archimedes’ theory from over 2000 years ago. The theory might even be older than that. Archimedes was the first one to calculate pi to several places by using polygons. He cleverly inscribed a hexagon inside the circle, then circumscribed a hexagon outside the circle. From there, he took the circumference and divided it by the diameter for both hexagons. He used the average to get pi. Pi=circumference divided by diameter.

He found out that the more sides the polygon had for this method, the closer you got to pi. He ran this with polygons with 96 sides. Can you imagine how long that took 2 thousand years ago to write all of this down?

Nowadays, we have powerful computers that can run this same method for polygons with thousands of sides.

Archimedes, for all intents and purposes, proved that a polygon with an infinite amount of sides is indeed a circle.
Beautiful
 

Sudacafan

Bionic Poster
Infinity was addressed in Calc III regarding limits. For example x/0 is infinity 1/X as X approaches infinity=0.

The summation series 1/2 + 1/(2^2) + 1/(2^3)+....... +1/(2^x) as x approaches infinity is 1. This is why the professor said that we can reach 1. Without limits, you couldn't get there. He said put it this way...before you walk a meter, you have to first walk 1/2 a meter. But before you walk a 1/2 meter, you have to first walk half of that distance. This could go on infinitely. Thus, the summation series defined travel.
This reminds me of Achilles and the turtle. Am I right?
Movement is impossible.
 

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
Math major here and started out in Actuarial Science. Some of my colleges courses included Advanced Calculus, Differential Equations, Linear Algebra, Probability, Mathematical Statistics, Applied Stats, etc.. I no longer work as an actuary but more in programming and statistics within healthcare research and practice improvement.

Impressive !! Did your parents have high math skills ?? Did you ever wanted to go into engineering
 

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
I majored in math and I'm currently doing a PhD in econ which requires quite a bit of math. I've taken the standard linear algebra, multivariable calc, DiffsEq courses plus proof-based courses in real analysis and abstract algebra. Also took a grad course in partial DiffsEq which was proof-based. And probability and stats courses, some of which were proof-based. Now my econ research is mostly empirical so I don't use most of the higher-level math.

I struggled with trig and that was it ??
I realized later in life that it’s just right angles and that is what man used to navigate the oceans
I still don’t get it
 

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
I majored in math and I'm currently doing a PhD in econ which requires quite a bit of math. I've taken the standard linear algebra, multivariable calc, DiffsEq courses plus proof-based courses in real analysis and abstract algebra. Also took a grad course in partial DiffsEq which was proof-based. And probability and stats courses, some of which were proof-based. Now my econ research is mostly empirical so I don't use most of the higher-level math.

What’s harder diff cal or mv cal
 

fundrazer

G.O.A.T.
I've completed differential and integral calculus. I don't remember much of it. Although if I decide to go for a masters in data science then I will likely need to do Calculus 1-3. Professor I work with thought the program might be a good fit for me, but I'm not sure.

Maybe I will consider it after working a year or two, I'm not sure yet.
 

jhick

Hall of Fame
Impressive !! Did your parents have high math skills ?? Did you ever wanted to go into engineering
My parents were both teachers (elementary school/junior high). Both of them were college graduates but I don't think either of them went through high level math courses.....neither had calculus, probably through Algebra II/Trig
 

jhick

Hall of Fame
Impressive !! Did your parents have high math skills ?? Did you ever wanted to go into engineering
I started down the pre-engineering track (civil) but then switched to actuarial science. I did end up continuing to get my minor in physics.
 

jhick

Hall of Fame
I struggled with trig and that was it ??
I realized later in life that it’s just right angles and that is what man used to navigate the oceans
I still don’t get it
Trig wasn't too bad for me. Personally, I didn't care for Geometry and proofs,
 

jhick

Hall of Fame
I heard DIff cal is a killer
Not my class. We had a professor who was more interested in the application of diff eq and never really taught out of the book. His tests were pretty simple so as long as you put the effort in and showed up for class, you did well.
 

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
Math major here and started out in Actuarial Science. Some of my colleges courses included Advanced Calculus, Differential Equations, Linear Algebra, Probability, Mathematical Statistics, Applied Stats, etc.. I no longer work as an actuary but more in programming and statistics within healthcare research and practice improvement.

What is your IQ ??
130-140 ???
 

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
I am just smart at making funny observations but I have great survival skills and about bad people and places
 

dgold44

G.O.A.T.
The only science I liked was chemistry !!!

I had a mental breakdown during organic chem lab as I had zero clue what the hell was going on and everyone else was doing their experiments . I told the teacher I was feeling sick and went outside and starting crying lol
 

jhick

Hall of Fame
What is your IQ ??
130-140 ???
No idea. I don't think I have an extra high IQ. Math is just one of those subjects that I have an interest in and my brain seems to be wired that way. I went through college with a 3.5 GPA. I thought I was smart in math until I took some of the actuarial exams where I was competing against geniuses and ultimately decided it wasn't for me.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
Physics and Math guys are fine.

A lot of the Comp Science Software guys lack basic communication skills and take some perverse delight in cryptic coding and making things much more complicated than they need to be. That explains all the crap software projects that fail and have to be totally rewritten from scratch. Seen it happen a million times.:(

Many universities started addressing this problem a decade ago.
 
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movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
The proofs are the good part of mathematics.

If you think that you know mathematics, this book will teach you otherwise. It covers a lot of advanced topics of mathematics and it's a huge book and it doesn't even cover Fractal Geometry. It's the first place I looked - I determined that I didn't have any books on Fractal Geometry at home.

51rq-WmajnL._SX397_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg


Here's another interesting book on mathematics though it's for computer science students. It's a combination of CONtinuous and disCRETE mathematics. But the joke is that it's called Concrete Mathematics because it is hard.

61oqP3wQsiL._SX350_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
 

NLBwell

Legend
I took math courses to get my engineering degree. I don't like the math courses that much, but when I looked back at my transcript, I realized that I got better grades in math than in engineering.
 

bad_call

Legend
I only went to calculus at the college level. My claim to fame with math is that I served as a math tutor in college.

I found that for me, it was a matter of how I viewed math that made a real difference: if I thought it was some exotic, unattainable subject, then I would freak working it. IF, however, I told myself that with a bit of patience I could master stuff, then I found I could.

ONE thing I realize now is that, unlike many other subjects, the NEAT thing about math is that there are answers. . . if you put in the work, you find the answers. Some academic subjects don't have this great promise.

not always the case since there are problems that take a "gifted" one to solve while the others fail.
 
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sureshs

Bionic Poster
ONE thing I realize now is that, unlike many other subjects, the NEAT thing about math is that there are answers. . . if you put in the work, you find the answers. Some academic subjects don't have this great promise.

Not really. There are many math problems which are called open problems which people have not been able to solve for centuries.

Among the other "easy" problems, it is very very easy to find problems which someone can solve in 5 minutes and others never in their lifetime. Mathematics is one of the disciplines in which the gap between genius and ordinary cannot be surmounted by hard work. The PhD math qualifying exams at top Universities have many such stories surrounding them. Very hard working but not extremely bright students quit out of frustration.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Bionic Poster
With data becoming bigger and bigger, these numbers might actually be useful sooner than we know! Besides, Google got the name for their company from Googol :)

I think that I might dread the day when a Google search returns a Googol number of results. Would it take a Googol amount of femtoseconds to do so?
.
 

Steady Eddy

Legend
I majored in math, but I don't think I have a great aptitude for it. I love math, but it doesn't love me back. It's a case of unrequited love.

Even more so in tennis. I love to play tennis, even though I have no talent for the game.
 

onehandbh

G.O.A.T.
I have a B.A. in Applied Mathematics. Off the top of my head, I completed 7 quarters of Calculus(differential and integral calc, couple quarters of multivariable calc, theory of calc, advanced calc), a quarter of Ordinary Differential Equations, 2 quarters of Partial Differential Equations, a quarter of non-Euclidian Geometry, Complex Variables. I also had Abstract Algebra and Linear Algebra(proof course)....this was 30 years ago. Unfortunately, I have forgotten about 80% of what I learned.

When I tutored my nephew in differential calculus, I had to go online first to brush up, then teach him. This was quite depressing, considering that I aced this in high school without trying that hard.

My brain doesn't process info nearly as quickly as it did 30+ years ago. This is perhaps the worst part of again, IMHO. Thankfully, I am healthy. Things could be a lot worse.
I think I completed about the same amount of math as you but I did not get a B.A. in math.
 
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onehandbh

G.O.A.T.
Among the other "easy" problems, it is very very easy to find problems which someone can solve in 5 minutes and others never in their lifetime. Mathematics is one of the disciplines in which the gap between genius and ordinary cannot be surmounted by hard work. The PhD math qualifying exams at top Universities have many such stories surrounding them. Very hard working but not extremely bright students quit out of frustration.

There are many 10 year olds that are better at math than me.

Then there are mathemagicians like the ones you speak of.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Bionic Poster
..

A lot of the Comp Science Software guys lack basic communication skills and take some perverse delight in cryptic coding and making things much more complicated than they need to be. That explains all the crap software projects that fail and have to be totally rewritten from scratch. Seen it happen a million times.:(

Isn't that cryptic coding (with minimal or remarks) sometimes done in an effort to ensure their job security?
 
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