How long does it take to get rid of Jumper's knee?

Koaske

Rookie
I've had jumper's knee for a few weeks now , and I've recently started doing some exercises that should help me get rid of it. I was wondering how long it takes to get rid of jumper's knee...? If you know or have personal experience about it , please tell me.
 

Marius_Hancu

Talk Tennis Guru
I don't (fortunately) have direct experience with it, but I think no one can tell you exactly:

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http://health.discovery.com/centers/nutritionfitness/fitness/articles/experts/shealey/jumper.html

The effects of patellar tendonitis may last weeks to months. How long
it takes to recover depends on the severity of the condition and your
willingness to apply treatments. However, not overusing the knee while
treating jumper's knee may be the best remedy.
----------

Look at Nadal. He certainly has something similar.
And he isn't well enough even after more than a month.
OK, he won in Madrid, but wasn't perfectly well.
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
Took 10 weeks of therapy to finally get rid of the pain. However rest won't cure a thing.
 

goober

Legend
I took about 6 weeks to get rid of it. I cut down my tennis schedule to 2 times a week. Started stretching before and after matches. Took some NSAIDS. I bought a patellar tendon brace which was worthless. Never had a problem since.
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
hot pack on knee to warm it up
5 minute warm-up on a bike
Stretch hamstrings, quads, back, calves, achilles
wall squats
incline stand for calves, achilles
10x10 squats using a thera-ball
3x10 or more lunges forward and to both sides of leg
step-up onto box then slowly lower leg by bending your knee and touch floor
balance on a wobble board
used a ladder drill
lateral suicides on a basketball court
leg curls
leg extensions using thera-band tubing
knee stabilization exercises using tubing, hip abduction, flexion
leg presses
some other balancing exercises
ice
forgot other exercises but that Cho-pat strap did nothing for this condition
took at least 75 minutes for everything
 

Marius_Hancu

Talk Tennis Guru
Ronaldo,

thanks for the list.

thus no machines (say leg press machine)? just tubing, balls, i.e. soft implements?

interesting idea with the hot pack on knee to warm it up
were you recommended to keep it after rehab when playing tennis? same for icing

no stretching at the end?

no biking at the end for slowing down?

walls squats: i.e. with a ball behind your back sliding on the wall?
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
Near the end of this routine, used Total Gym for one-legged bodyweight leg presses. Then a leg press and leg curl machine. Wall squats are really wall sitting. 10X10 wall squats are with a thera-ball. Watch a woman do those squats with one leg and dumbbells. Physical Therapist stretched me out at the end. No biking as I needed to get to work. 1st place ever saw kettlebell workouts. Cleans and press, s n a t c h es, and looks like a two-armed swing? Like a golf swing but this was a college grad preparing for the NFL combine.
 

Marius_Hancu

Talk Tennis Guru
Ronaldo said:
1st place ever saw kettlebell workouts. Cleans and press, s n a t c h es, and looks like a two-armed swing? Like a golf swing but this was a college grad preparing for the NFL combine.
I am doing them, but with dumbells (which is less safe ...), at my fitness club. I am the only one trying them around here.
check:
http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/kettlename.php
Very good for power and explosiveness, but of course stressful.
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
Marius, btw it's back. Chondromalacia, so time to re-visit this routine. Spent the summer playing tennis and not working out. Must pay the piper
 

Marius_Hancu

Talk Tennis Guru
Ronaldo said:
Marius, btw it's back. Chondromalacia, so time to re-visit this routine. Spent the summer playing tennis and not working out. Must pay the piper
Sorry to hear that. So, for you this routine really worked out and nothing else? Thus, with Chondromalacia it's mostly an issue of strengthening your muscles? That's what I thought too, but there are issues of alignment, etc.

Good luck with your training:)
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
Hate to state this but this is more common among women, so overall leg strength may be the overriding factor. Yes, had this condition several times since 1984 and strengthening the vastus medialis obliquus always solves this problem. However, replacing worn shoes seems to make a difference along with using my orthotics in every shoe.
 

Bungalo Bill

G.O.A.T.
Ronaldo said:
Took 10 weeks of therapy to finally get rid of the pain. However rest won't cure a thing.
Wow, Ronaldo,

I went through that late in my training for triathlons. I developed that under the knee and it is painful.

It is a weird symptom the chaffing of the cartlidge. I do not experience it that much anymore but for awhile I thought it was over for me.

I did the following to help:

1. Stretching the thighs, buttocks, hip flexors, calves, hamstrings, and lower back.

2. Wore a tendon support strap below the knee during recovery.

3. Strengthened the lower thigh muscles that pull up the lower leg. The inner muscle of the lower thigh ended up firing last when straightening the leg, so I had to retrain the leg to fire the inner big musle on the thigh near the knee to fire first (sorry I do not know muscle anatomy).

4. Stopped running or anything else like it. Started eliptical machines and or swimming. Riding the bike didnt always solve it as it pulls on the lower knee tendon.

Hope that helps.
 

Marius_Hancu

Talk Tennis Guru
Ronaldo said:
Hate to state this but this is more common among women, so overall leg strength may be the overriding factor. Yes, had this condition several times since 1984 and strengthening the vastus medialis obliquus always solves this problem. However, replacing worn shoes seems to make a difference along with using my orthotics in every shoe.
Yes, I have a lady friend suffering from it.

As far as I know, the ladies have this problem more frequently because of the misalignment problems caused in the patella region by their wide hips.

Are your orthotics the expensive rigid/permanent type or the less expensive Spenco inserts?

Are they full length or just from the arch to heel?

Thanks for the info.
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
Full length rigid/sport orthotics, made by Prescription Flex. Found out that this sport model has more fiberglass and less graphite in the mix. This material feels as hard as your tennis racquet.
 

Marius_Hancu

Talk Tennis Guru
Ronaldo said:
Full length rigid/sport orthotics, made by Prescription Flex. Found out that this sport model has more fiberglass and less graphite in the mix. This material feels as hard as your tennis racquet.
I know.

The question I have about it is if this stiffness doesn't contribute to generating other problems, such as shin or even knee, by the lack of cushioning it introduces at the level of the soles of the feet.

I understand it helps in terms of stability and providing the proper orientation for the foot and the leg (for those with patella or Achilles problems), but say when playing tennis on HC or running on asphalt, isn't cushioning a concern too?
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
Used the thinnest Spenco flat insole over the orthotic to add cushioning but was not satisfied with the results. Tried the Powerstep and Superfeet insoles but actually had better luck with some of the Birkenstock insoles. Plantar fasciaitis has made this choice moot. Other than this knee pain, no problem and my feet are pain-free. This started after ramping up the amount of tennis from 3-4 times a week to 7-11 and 3-5 hr sessions. Everyday and at times twice a day tennis is not easy but it's the end of the season here and may not play much indoors on hardcourts.
 

Ronaldo

Talk Tennis Guru
Btw, appears Ivan Ljubicic has joined this club today. His right knee is wrapped below the kneecap.
 
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