How many miles run in tennis?

brosamj

New User
I know a lot of things need to be taken into account, but I was curious if anyone has any ideas of how much distance is covered in the course of a match? I know that it may vary a bit according to what level of a player you are, but lets say 4.5 who plays more in the backcourt. Any ideas on how much ground could be expected to be covered in a 90 minute match? 1 mile? 2 miles? more?
 

Wes_Loves_Dunlop

Professional
you cant really compare because when you run on a track its non stop.
but for tennis, you stop every 15 seconds or so. 40 if its a really long rally.
 

Funbun

Professional
I'm a weird combination of a cross country runner and a tennis player. Judging from the FEEL of a 1 set match, I suppose it's somewhat around only about 1.5 miles. I play a mainly defensive game, so I usually stay around the baseline. It really isn't much distance.
 

autumn_leaf

Hall of Fame
i'm not sure what the point of the question is. just to figure out distance? cause that would very on what type of style you play. if you serve and volley and also chip and charge all match i would think around 1/2 mile. if you push and grind all match then it would be many times more of course.

also you can't guess how much calories is really burned because of the different playing styles and levels. some people might push all day long and just have to walk around the court. others might be hard hitters and you're sprinting around the court for that 15-40 seconds for each point.
 

jannickj

New User
where can i find...

Hey r2473,

just an off topic subject.

I'm looking for the updated sw2 swingweight static weight / lead excel program on these boards.
Every link seems to be dead. will it be possible for you to send it to me on email
collection50@hotmail.com

thanks in advance
 

chess9

Hall of Fame
I wore my HR monitor, with distance measurement, made by Polar for quite a few of my matches. An average two set match was giving me about 2 miles, BUT, the Polar does not measure backing up, and measures sideways poorly. So, I'm guessing it's in the 2.5 mile range for the 4.0-5.0 player for two sets. This suggests that for training purposes, your distance runs for BASE BUILDING should be 3-5 miles, IMHO.

-Robert
 
I wore my HR monitor, with distance measurement, made by Polar for quite a few of my matches. An average two set match was giving me about 2 miles, BUT, the Polar does not measure backing up, and measures sideways poorly. So, I'm guessing it's in the 2.5 mile range for the 4.0-5.0 player for two sets. This suggests that for training purposes, your distance runs for BASE BUILDING should be 3-5 miles, IMHO.

-Robert
Wow.
This is original research you are reporting. Thanks.
 

Moz

Hall of Fame
I wore my HR monitor, with distance measurement, made by Polar for quite a few of my matches. An average two set match was giving me about 2 miles, BUT, the Polar does not measure backing up, and measures sideways poorly. So, I'm guessing it's in the 2.5 mile range for the 4.0-5.0 player for two sets. This suggests that for training purposes, your distance runs for BASE BUILDING should be 3-5 miles, IMHO.

-Robert
I always envisioned you playing tennis on your bike so your final mileage would be very dependent on your bike's turning circle.
 

Gmedlo

Professional
There isn't any carryover for this statistic to training because of the rest intervals in tennis, as well as the difference in movement patterns. Running forward in a straight line at a constant speed for one single period of time will not condition you to move laterally as quickly as possible from a stop for a 2 hour match that has ~10+ seconds of rest between each point.
 

chess9

Hall of Fame
There isn't any carryover for this statistic to training because of the rest intervals in tennis, as well as the difference in movement patterns. Running forward in a straight line at a constant speed for one single period of time will not condition you to move laterally as quickly as possible from a stop for a 2 hour match that has ~10+ seconds of rest between each point.
Well, running in a straight line is going to make you faster moving laterally and faster sprinting forwards and backwards, but it does so indirectly. Essentially, we all need a BASE LAYER of training, which prepares the body to do the training that will make you faster. If you had students to coach, you wouldn't simply start them off with sprinting drills, fast lunges, etc. You'd do what McEnroe does, have them run 5 miles for base conditioning, and follow up after a few weeks with the speed stuff. I don't want to go into the metabolic systems, pathways, and trainining zones here, but there are plenty of web sites that explains this sort of thing. I remember in the 1960's I was in Tampa at a big tournament and a Mexican player was there training on his off day. My buddy and I were hitting on an outside court watching him train. I can't remember the guy's name but this was back in the days when the Mexicans had 4 or 5 very good players and he was one of them. Anyway, we stopped our play and in pidgeon Spanglish we chatted about his training. He said he was going for a three mile run, so we decided to run together. At that time, I could run high 15's fairly easily for 5K, so I didn't think this guy would be much to handle. ;) We ran easy for about a mile and then we kicked up the pace. Soon we were running around 5:15 or so and he was barely breaking a sweat. My buddy had faded back about 400 meters with about half a mile to go. This Mexican guy just kicked it up a gear right at the end, and I was dropped! I held on but he beat me easily by about 15 seconds or so. Now, that was back in the day when distance running wasn't that popular with the playing pros, but today, lots of pros do 3-10 mile runs.

I wish I could tell everyone not to bother with distance running, but I'm a big believer in the value of that conditioning. If you are older, do less of it, and throw in some biking which is easier on the body.

Just my humble opinion and I'm sure I'm wrong as usual.

-Robert
 

chess9

Hall of Fame
During the Nadal and Monflis match, McEnroe said at his camp he makes all his students run 5miles/day
This probably demonstrates how much McEnroe has learned about training techniques compared to when he was a pro. I'm sure he appreciates the work of the many fine exercise physiologists who've raised the standard of training to the high level it is today. Roddick and Murray would probably praise their trainers as well. Most of the training in the 50's and 60's and even 70's had little scientific basis. We have a long way to go, but the bar has definitely been moved much higher.

-Robert
 
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