How Many Racquets Do You Bring To A Match And Are They Identical?

Multiple Racquets For Regular Play?

  • One Racquet Only

    Votes: 6 4.1%
  • Multiple Racquets - same model - same string setups

    Votes: 78 52.7%
  • Multiple Racquets - same model - different string setups

    Votes: 32 21.6%
  • Multiple Racquets - different models only because it just worked out this way

    Votes: 20 13.5%
  • Multiple Racquets - different models/setups intentionally, each for situational use

    Votes: 7 4.7%
  • I like pie.

    Votes: 4 2.7%
  • Pie is lame, caek for life!!!

    Votes: 1 0.7%

  • Total voters
    148

pabletion

Hall of Fame
Two. I've never owned more than two racquets at the same time, but I'm actually seeing the necessity of owning a third one, just in case. I'm a string breaker, they last 10-12 hours of play at the most, so I'm thinking of always having a third unused racquet with me all the time just in case both of the other ones break.
 

NLBwell

Legend
I bring 4 rackets to matches because that's how many fit in my bag. Usually two or three of my Microgel or Youtek Prestige Pros of various stringing and one or two to hit with for fun such as ProStaff 85, original Black Ace, Response Ti, Head Director, Yonex RD Ti 98 long, etc.
 

R1FF

Professional
I think it’s probably far less important than gear heads like to believe.

I’ve played against guys that switch rackets all the time and those that haven’t switched in a decade. No difference in how they play from what I can tell.

It’s placebo for the most part. If having an identical Racquet gives you confidence then it’ll help. But if you free yourself from that mindset you’ll realize it doesn’t mean much.
I have my racquets numbered.

They are identical model/strings/tension yet I can tell the difference in feel, even when freshly restrung using electronic stringer.

I thought maybe placebo effect so I mixed them up, covering my numbered markings & brand new grips. I could still tell which one i liked serving with better.

But as far as overall performance goes, after 30 minutes of either racquet I adjust to the feel and can play with either and forget thinking about it.

I have no idea what would be the possible cause for the difference other than I’d think it’s impossible for there not to be some degree of variance in identical racquets. Composite motorcycle chassis made by experts have appx a 2-3% variance. It’s almost unnoticeable but to only the rare few pro racers. Just for comparison, on the other end of the spectrum a steel chassis electronically welded by the best frame builders in the world can have a 15% variance.

I would guess that consumer grade tennis racquets are made to lighter variance tolerances than the racquets the pros get. And that there is some noticeable degree of variance.
 
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Blade0324

Hall of Fame
I bring 3 racquets to that are the same to the court, usually 2 are strung the same and a third with a bit more of a control setup for the days I need a bit more or if I end up playing someone where I need the extra control.
 

CHtennis

Rookie
I have my racquets numbered.

They are identical model/strings/tension yet I can tell the difference in feel, even when freshly restrung using electronic stringer.

I thought maybe placebo effect so I mixed them up, covering my numbered markings & brand new grips. I could still tell which one i liked serving with better.

But as far as overall performance goes, after 30 minutes of either racquet I adjust to the feel and can play with either and forget thinking about it.

I have no idea what would be the possible cause for the difference other than I’d think it’s impossible for there not to be some degree of variance in identical racquets. Composite motorcycle chassis made by experts have appx a 2-3% variance. It’s almost unnoticeable but to only the rare few pro racers. Just for comparison, on the other end of the spectrum a steel chassis electronically welded by the best frame builders in the world can have a 15% variance.

I would guess that consumer grade tennis racquets are made to lighter variance tolerances than the racquets the pros get. And that there is some noticeable degree of variance.

The same versions of racquets will be different, there is a variance tolerance for the manufacturing process. The USTA national tennis center in Orlando will balance your racquets for you so that they are exactly the same (within a smaller variance, cant really be exact). That being said in general most people cant tell the difference and should not waste the money but if you can tell the service is out there. I agree with @Dartagnan64 that it is mostly a placebo effect but if that works for you then go for it.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
The same versions of racquets will be different, there is a variance tolerance for the manufacturing process. The USTA national tennis center in Orlando will balance your racquets for you so that they are exactly the same (within a smaller variance, cant really be exact). That being said in general most people cant tell the difference and should not waste the money but if you can tell the service is out there. I agree with @Dartagnan64 that it is mostly a placebo effect but if that works for you then go for it.
Matched within 1/2 gram.



J
 

R1FF

Professional
Matched within 1/2 gram.



J
Wow. You weren’t joking!

Is it the weight/balance that accounts for all the variance?

I would think there’d be a variance in flex characteristics. Since no two composite pieces are the same. Albeit, the margins are slim and composites have really good consistency compared to other materials.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
Wow. You weren’t joking!

Is it the weight/balance that accounts for all the variance?

I would think there’d be a variance in flex characteristics. Since no two composite pieces are the same. Albeit, the margins are slim and composites have really good consistency compared to other materials.
I just hit the ball and hope for the best.

J
 

stvincent

New User
As I am new here, I will include the extra modifiers...

[sarcasm]
I usually take 4: 1 Slazenger Graphite normal head wood raquet for throwing; 2 Wilson Pro Staff Mid SIze for playing, and an extra identical Wilson PS which is cracked, but I bring it for extra effect. (i.e. 3 is better than 2.)
[/sarcasm]
 

d-quik

Professional
I need around 5-6 racquets except for in grand slams, where, due to the extended length of the match, I take around 9-12 instead (I bring more to the French opens because the rallies are longer and less to Wimbledon due to the opposite reasons). Also in slams I also extend the length of the racquet to match the extended length of the matches. never made it past the semifinals so far so I am still just a scrub.
 

widebody 13

New User
I have two bags of rackets. The "competitive bag" has 7 and they are all numbered. I'm not trying to impress anyone. My rackets are very old (Wilson 3.0 Titanium Stretch) and I really like them so I play with a different one every match so that no particular racket will wear out. I'm hoping they will be my last rackets. When I'm hitting just for exercise with my wife, I bring bag #2 which has 3 Fischer Superforms. A lot of people give me a strange look when I bring out the Superforms.
 
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Cashman

Hall of Fame
I think it is prudent (and polite) to have two racquets on hand if you are playing competition tennis.

I own two racquets that are the same, mostly because I used to be a string-breaker and I would routinely have to change racquets mid-set. I changed my setup a few years ago, and now I rarely break strings. As a result I will probably not bother buying two racquets next time I upgrade. I will just hang onto one of my old ones for emergencies.

Having multiple identical frames strung at different tensions is a nice luxury for those days where you just can't get your range right, but it's not one I can justify the cost of as a recreational player.
 

R1FF

Professional
I wish I had the guts to try different string setups. I’ve been using nearly the same setup since day 1. Two racquets, same exact setup.

I need to buy a 3rd to test some stuff out.

54/51
RPM blast on mains
Spiraltek on crosses

I have no idea what any of it means. It’s the setup that a tennis lifer originally strung for me. Only thing I changed was less tension gave me more control. I took it down 5 lbs from what it was originally.

I got a phobia against messing with too much stuff at once. Not wanting to fix what isnt broken. But I do know I need to experiment more.
 

smg

New User
I've recently started doing something that has a made a pretty big difference in my game. I have one racket that I start the match with strung with Velocity/Strike Force RIP that gives me decent spin and control and is somewhat forgiving. Then for the second set I switch to a racket (same model/weight) strung with Cyclone Tour/Revolve that is lower powered and has more spin that I can be very aggressive with. I had a problem where as a match went on I would get less and less aggressive with my shots, even if I was playing great and winning big. This has helped solve that problem for me. I can get into the match hitting well and then switch to my more aggressive setup and still feel confident swinging out and going for my shots. Not sure what I will do if I have to go to a third set, but it hasn't come up yet and I'm undefeated in the 11 matches I've played this way.

Is this something anyone else does or am I just using my equipment to cover up a mental weakness?
 

Pitti

Rookie
I might be an exception. I just carry 2 racquets if the strings look in good condition or if I restrung them not long ago. If not, I carry 3:

#1: A Wilson Ultra Tour with a little bit of lead at the throat. My main racquet. Really forgiving sweetspot, slightly underpowered at times. Nice control.
#2: An old and beaten up Wilson 6.1 Team 95, with a little bit of lead at the throat. Nice control although it lacks some pop at serves. The smaller head lets me attack with a bit more power than with the UT. I probably need to replace this one, since it's starting to give me some wrist pain after 15 years of service.
#3: An old Babolat Drive G lite. Just in case. This racquet is lent to me. I should put some weight on it if I wanted to play with it, but the person who lends it to me plays at a lower level and doesn't need that extra weight.

Nadal would beat me up with any of those racquets, and without breaking a sweat. So, even if I love new gear and trying new things, I prefer to focus on my game improvement.
 

ChaelAZ

Legend
I use two matched set of 2015 Blades, rotating sets to help with string wear and maintaining a bit of consistency in tension. I use a set until they start feeling dead, then I send those to the sohp to be restrung and play with the fresh set. That allows me to have two in the shop, but still two to play with. I use two to play with because I change racquet on every changeover. Sometimes I do change strung tension between sets just for testing, but for the most part I string all of them the same, depdning on time of year.

I still do this, but only have two matched V7 Blades and also two matched 2015 Blades. I usually also have a few misc racquets just in case or for fun.The variety has been the last model Ultra, a Wilson 95s, Prince Pro 100, a Burn 100s, my old Prince CTS 90, Balabolat Pure Drive or Aero Pro, and several others I still have laying around.
 

Chalkdust

Rookie
I bring 4. They are identical - matched, and strung the same.
I'm not a string breaker but am a very heavy sweater, and down here in FL my grips get soaked and slippery within 10 mins. So I usually rotate between racquets at each change over, so that by that time I'm back to the first one the grip has mostly dried out.
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
I like trying different frames so it would be annoying and time consuming to try to match everything. I just add lead until it feels right. Only racquets I really like stock are the 93P and POG 107.
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
I've recently started doing something that has a made a pretty big difference in my game. I have one racket that I start the match with strung with Velocity/Strike Force RIP that gives me decent spin and control and is somewhat forgiving. Then for the second set I switch to a racket (same model/weight) strung with Cyclone Tour/Revolve that is lower powered and has more spin that I can be very aggressive with. I had a problem where as a match went on I would get less and less aggressive with my shots, even if I was playing great and winning big. This has helped solve that problem for me. I can get into the match hitting well and then switch to my more aggressive setup and still feel confident swinging out and going for my shots. Not sure what I will do if I have to go to a third set, but it hasn't come up yet and I'm undefeated in the 11 matches I've played this way.

Is this something anyone else does or am I just using my equipment to cover up a mental weakness?
I love this place.

J
 

Steady Eddy

Hall of Fame
I have 4 racquets in my tennis bag. Two are the same, the other two different. But if I broke a string I wouldn't use the identical one, because it has a pink grip, (my wife uses that one).
 

zipplock

Professional
I bring 4. They are identical - matched, and strung the same.
I'm not a string breaker but am a very heavy sweater, and down here in FL my grips get soaked and slippery within 10 mins. So I usually rotate between racquets at each change over, so that by that time I'm back to the first one the grip has mostly dried out.
Same for me but 2 racquets.
 

FedLIKEnot

Professional
I have four racquets that I always have in my bag, I do rotate them for even wear on the strings. I had all of them matched a few years ago, but seeing as how I use a discontinued racquet I may need to grab a few more as they become available on third party selling sites. All with poly in them and usually send off two to be strung at a time around my USTA match schedule. Or as is the case these days every month or two depending on how much I can get out and hit.
 

ttbrowne

Hall of Fame
3 of the same racquet.
Same string.
2 have lead tape for different court surfaces/wind conditions.
1 w/o lead tape
2 at 54, 1 at 58
Works well for me.
 

Big Ed

Rookie
be very leery of the guy that shows up with one racquet and a wal-mart bag containing all his "gear". he's prolly a beast. i personally have 2 racquets set up the same in case a string breakage occurs.
Big Ed
 
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