How much difference between 98 vs 100?

flargosa

Rookie
How much difference between 98 vs 100? Is one size more commonly used over the other for two handed backhand?
 

Power Player

Talk Tennis Guru
No..almost the same. You can hit a 2 hander with a 90 or 95, but the bigger sticks are a little more forgiving.
 

Torres

Banned
It's not the hoop size you should be concerned about - its the sweetspot size and how it hits immediately outside of the central sweetspot, you should be more interested in.

Small sweetspot 98sq" v 100sq" racquet = big difference
Large sweetspot 98sq" v 100sq" racquet = smaller difference

Not 98sq" racquets are created equal.
 
i hit a two handed backhand with a 98 and a 95. its fine no problems. i kinda prefer it cause better control. and maneuverability
 

bcart1991

Professional
Mechanics, string pattern/density, and head shape will each have a larger effect on the 2hbh than a 2% difference in raw head size.
 

pyrokid

Hall of Fame
I use a 95 and hit a two hander

Edit ten years later: it was a bad idea, my backhand is much better now with a larger head size
 
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fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
Doesn't really matter what the pros use... they're not us and we're not them.

Difference between 98" and 100" is nothing to worry about. Any specific racquet that's a decent "fit" for your swing will be easier for you to hit the ball with, regardless of its hoop size. That's why demoing whenever you can is so important. When the fit is right for you, it won't matter if the racquet is a mid, and oversize, or anything in between.
 

snoflewis

Hall of Fame
there isnt a racket that a 1 hander can hit w/ that a 2 hander cant. it's a matter of whether you can hit w/ that racket or not. i've used midsize rackets for several years and it was fine for me.
 

flargosa

Rookie
There is 95 and 100, what is the reason behind 98? Is this for those who want the control of smaller racquets but a larger sweet spot of 100?
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
Don't get too hung up on it; the differences are extremely subtle. Hoop size is only one small component among all the other spec's of a racquet, along with string type and tension. There are no specific parameters that you'll get from a 100" head that you won't get with a 98" option. Depending on the individual designs, a 98" frame may feel and perform just like a 100" option, but it might also seem larger or smaller when you hit a ball with it.

Racquet builders use slightly different designs the same way that shoe manufacturers put out their own types of sneakers. It's a matter of what is the best fit for you and you only know that once you try it on.
 

Sreeram

Professional
According to me there is not much difference between 98 and 100 sq inch. The there is a difference between 100sq inch racquet with a round head and one with oval head. It is just to the matter of getting used to them. Personally i cannot hit the ball at the center of a string bed most of the time and hence i need a 95 to 100 sq inch racquet. If your hand eye coordination is better then go with less than 95.
 

markmdfw

Rookie
Interesting because when I had a yonex of old and compared it to the newer, both specs were 98, but the older one was a bit larger. comparing the 002 tours to the 1700 ti long.
 

mctennis

Legend
Doesn't really matter what the pros use... they're not us and we're not them.

Difference between 98" and 100" is nothing to worry about. Any specific racquet that's a decent "fit" for your swing will be easier for you to hit the ball with, regardless of its hoop size. That's why demoing whenever you can is so important. When the fit is right for you, it won't matter if the racquet is a mid, and oversize, or anything in between.
Ditto, ditto, ditto. Such a great an accurate reply. Dead on.
 

hyperthom007

New User
Usually around 2 sq inches. :)
Nah, its about 2 without the sq inches. He asked whats the difference between 98 and 100.
Ok just joking.
I own a 100 and 98 square inch racquet which are about the same specs. There are some minute differences alright. I don't know if its psychological or physiological. The difference does exist.
I felt less control using the 100. I am sticking on 98 currently but in terms of sweetspot, there are little difference. It depends on the frame I guess. Double handed however, is easier on 100. Psychological I guess...:confused:
 
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they're just numbers. and not all 98s or 100s or 95s play the same or look the same. and in the big picture, head size in only one of many factors that constitute what works for you. and there really isn't any general wisdom with regard to headsize and two-handed backhands or one-handers. it's all so subjective and individual. don't worry so much about the numbers so much as the overall feel and performance
 

fattsoo

Semi-Pro
IMHO not much differences...i use the 98sq in mg mp radical and the ag 500 tour off and on and the frame size does not feel any different at all...what makes the most difference for me is the string pattern...one is 18x20 and the other one is 16x18 (which i like if I want to add that extra spin ;) )
 

yellow ball

New User
IMHO not much differences...i use the 98sq in mg mp radical and the ag 500 tour off and on and the frame size does not feel any different at all...what makes the most difference for me is the string pattern...one is 18x20 and the other one is 16x18 (which i like if I want to add that extra spin ;) )
Agree with you !!
 

Lobbie

New User
Doesn't really matter what the pros use... they're not us and we're not them.

Difference between 98" and 100" is nothing to worry about. Any specific racquet that's a decent "fit" for your swing will be easier for you to hit the ball with, regardless of its hoop size. That's why demoing whenever you can is so important. When the fit is right for you, it won't matter if the racquet is a mid, and oversize, or anything in between.
"Doesn't really matter what the pros use... they're not us and we're not them". Excellent and often overlooked point.
 

MajesticMoose

Hall of Fame
A true 98 and 100 aren't that much different. I would go 98 if anything. 100 is too big for my game personally. 95 really is the sweetspot.
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
I have some older 92" Prince NXG mids that are almost 13 oz. in stock form and also super-soft. They feel like the whole racquet is a sweet-spot - even framers aren't half bad. But I actually forget that these are "mids" when I hit with them because it seems so easy to catch the ball in the heart of the string bed with a lot of consistency.

If a 95" rig has comfortable flex along with enough beef to be good and stable, I agree that I could be as happy with that as just about anything under the sun.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
My two favorite racquets in my bag are my Phantom 93P and POG 107. At least you can tell a difference between them. Anything in the 95-104 range feels pretty similar and I dont see a big difference in 98-100 at all.
 

Tennisist

Semi-Pro
If you just lay one on top of the other, you would barely see the difference at all.

But that is just visually. Playing with them is entirely different matter. I find a lot more trampolining going on in 100" racquets. They make everything a lot less predictable. I have to play super carefully with them for fear of launching something.

For some reason, I do not get any of that with a 98 or 95.
Who would have thought -- 2 inches that you cannot even see -- make a world of a difference to me.
 

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
The actual hoop size is not that important.

What is important is the string pattern and the string spacing.

For example, the good old 2013 Babolat AeroPro Drive has a 100 hoop. But the string pattern is reasonably tighter than most other 100s.

Saying that, with all other things being equal, the 100 will usually be more forgiving on off centre shots than anything smaller.
 
Surprising to see it is not a consistent measure. It is of course the area of the inner hoop, how can there be any deviation from that?

What I find interesting, from an engineering point of view: how to measure that inner hoop? Especially when the frame is not flat (eg. 21 mm at throat, 25 mm at 3 - 9 o clock, 23 mm at top).
 

hurworld

Hall of Fame
Surprising to see it is not a consistent measure. It is of course the area of the inner hoop, how can there be any deviation from that?

What I find interesting, from an engineering point of view: how to measure that inner hoop? Especially when the frame is not flat (eg. 21 mm at throat, 25 mm at 3 - 9 o clock, 23 mm at top).
Use a piece of string. Measure the entire length of the inner hoop. Then use that as circumference.

String length L = 2 x pi x r, solve for r.

Then hoop area is pi x r x r


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

tonylg

Hall of Fame
Use a piece of string. Measure the entire length of the inner hoop. Then use that as circumference.

String length L = 2 x pi x r, solve for r.

Then hoop area is pi x r x r


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
LOL .. if the hoop is a circle.

Which it isn't.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
 

Karma Tennis

Hall of Fame
Just assume that the hoop is an ellipse and use the Mathematical formula for calculating the area within the boundary.

 

smalahove

Hall of Fame
The actual hoop size is not that important.

What is important is the string pattern and the string spacing.

For example, the good old 2013 Babolat AeroPro Drive has a 100 hoop. But the string pattern is reasonably tighter than most other 100s.

Saying that, with all other things being equal, the 100 will usually be more forgiving on off centre shots than anything smaller.
Add to that, there's a clear correlation between hoop/head size, and beam width.

Most 100 sq inch, have variable tapered beams: 23/26/23 mm
Most 97/98 have more even tapered beams of about 22 mm
Most 95 have constant beam width of about 20 mm

The first is a much more forgiving and easy-to-play frame than the others.
 

Crocodile

Legend
This thread got me thinking only because the other day I had a long hit with a Gamma 340x Tour with its 93 head and after having an initial break in period I really loved the feel and laser like accuracy but then I thought, not many tournament players use this size and I questioned whether I would be at a distinct disadvantage with this frame, which then brought me to this debate between the 98 snd 100 heads which surely must be the most popular sizes at tournaments. I still like the 95 to 97 head sizes as well and you can still some good frames in this category.
I think the issue with the 98 v 100 head size is how the frames correlate with the weight, balance and stiffness factor. Many companies make their 100 frames stiffer, lighter and more evenly balanced than the 98 counterparts. The exceptions have been Prince and Angell and some unique frames such as the Volkl Organix V1 Pro.
 

kailash

Professional
How much difference between 98 vs 100? Is one size more commonly used over the other for two handed backhand?
Not much different if those have same specs, especially wrt 2hb.

I.e., usually what differs are the following:
- stiffness: 100s are usually stiffer by few points.
- beam width: 98 thinner.
- weight: usually the 98 are heavier. Both static and swing.
- Power: because of above and other reasons like string patterns, 100 are more powerful, and 98 have more control.

For example, Ezone 98 vs 100.

And this will not hold between the different makes and models; for example my TC100 has thinner beam than Pro Staff 97.
 
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