How much faster can you string on a "good" machine?

beltsman

Legend
I have a cheapo dropweight string machine and I am sloooow stringing. But my stringer can get my racquet done in 15 minutes. I don't even see how that's possible! I know I need to get faster at weaving crosses (which I do one at a time), but is there something about the machine that let's him string super fast? He has a top of the line, I assume constant pull.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
my first machine was a Tremont stringer and after 5 string jobs I was never under an hour. Then I bought a Prince MP-100 and strung my first racket in under 40 minutes. I was under 30 after about 5 more rackets. I guess the real answer is what you consider a ”good“ stringer.
 

Purestriker

Semi-Pro
I have a cheapo dropweight string machine and I am sloooow stringing. But my stringer can get my racquet done in 15 minutes. I don't even see how that's possible! I know I need to get faster at weaving crosses (which I do one at a time), but is there something about the machine that let's him string super fast? He has a top of the line, I assume constant pull.
Are you able to see what type of machine they have? Our stringer usually takes 30 minutes with an electric tension Wilson stringing machine, 15 minutes seems way to0 fast. Would be worried about quality.
 

mpournaras

Hall of Fame
My best on a lockout from string cut to final knot was 26 mins.

Best of a Babolat Star 5 was 14 minutes in my prime. All high quality string jobs no shortcuts.

The best thing you can do is get out of drop weight stringers if you want to up your time and consistency. If I were buying a machine and actually cared about stringing faster and getting better and maybe doing it for some dollars... I would buy NOTHING less than a 6-pt mount lock-out machine. Everything on top of that is a bonus.
 

djNEiGht

Hall of Fame
! I know I need to get faster at weaving crosses (which I do one at a time), but is there something about the machine that let's him string super fast? He has a top of the line, I assume constant pull.
crosses one at a time? Try weaving one a-head. The strings are deflected allowing the weave to go faster.

Also...drop weights just take some time because you have to find the sweet spot
 

beltsman

Legend
Are you able to see what type of machine they have? Our stringer usually takes 30 minutes with an electric tension Wilson stringing machine, 15 minutes seems way to0 fast. Would be worried about quality.
Yes I was quite shocked but quality looks fine so far.
 

nochuola

Rookie
I started with the simplest of Gamma dropweight flying clamp machine. Excluding prep time of measuring and cutting strings, it was taking me about 45 minutes to string at the fastest. I then replaced the tension arm with the Wise tension head, and immediately was able to string ~10 minutes faster. With some practice, it now takes about 25~30 minutes for me to string (again excluding prep time). I suspect I might be able to save another 5 minutes if I properly upgraded to a 6pt mounting fixed clamp machine, but I just don't have the space.
 

loosegroove

Hall of Fame
I have a cheapo dropweight string machine and I am sloooow stringing. But my stringer can get my racquet done in 15 minutes. I don't even see how that's possible! I know I need to get faster at weaving crosses (which I do one at a time), but is there something about the machine that let's him string super fast? He has a top of the line, I assume constant pull.
It depends on where you're losing your time. Are you spending a bunch of time having to readjust so that the tension bar falls level? Or is it mainly how slow you are at weaving crosses? Maybe a little of both, but probably largely the latter, in which case it doesn't matter what machine you have, and it comes down to practice and repetition. To be honest, doing poly at low tension, I wasn't too far off with my Gamma X-2 with Stringway clamps, compared to a Prince Neos with a Wise.
 

1HBHfanatic

Legend
-the machine does help!!, but it is mainly the stringer and his experience
-no machine can make you "weave" fast/er, you still have to manually weave up/down/up/down/up/down, etc...
-sound like your stringer has thousands of racquets under his belt!!
-i learned on a klipermate-dropweight,, my best time on it ,(after logging 1k racquets) was about 25min.+ if i recall correct
-the electronic machines i now use, make the pulling/tensioning process much, much faster
-ive posted my times on these machines, so i wont repeat here :giggle:
-but none of the various electronic machines I've tried thus far changed the way i learned to weave on my klippermate (y)
 
D

Deleted member 776614

Guest
I was gonna say, pay attention to what steps seem to take a lot of time. I noticed at first I was spending what seemed like a lot of time looking for the end of the string, so after weaving one ahead, I leave the end of the string near the hoop (don't pull the slack) until after I pull tension.

Weaving takes a lot of time, and maybe the "15 minute stringer" uses one of those cross-string weaving tools?

Pay attention to how easily or quickly you move clamps around. Watching pro stringers on YouTube, I notice they're super efficient with moving their clamps - which requires properly adjusted and lubricated clamp bases. If that step isn't going quickly and smoothly, I don't think an electronic machine would help that much with overall time. If you can adjust your clamps within the time it takes for an electronic head to adjust itself then it seems like it would be very beneficial - if saving a couple minutes per stringing is worth it to you.
 
I was gonna say, pay attention to what steps seem to take a lot of time. I noticed at first I was spending what seemed like a lot of time looking for the end of the string, so after weaving one ahead, I leave the end of the string near the hoop (don't pull the slack) until after I pull tension.

Weaving takes a lot of time, and maybe the "15 minute stringer" uses one of those cross-string weaving tools?

Pay attention to how easily or quickly you move clamps around. Watching pro stringers on YouTube, I notice they're super efficient with moving their clamps - which requires properly adjusted and lubricated clamp bases. If that step isn't going quickly and smoothly, I don't think an electronic machine would help that much with overall time. If you can adjust your clamps within the time it takes for an electronic head to adjust itself then it seems like it would be very beneficial - if saving a couple minutes per stringing is worth it to you.
Only thing to add: I recall watching a video of a fast stringer and what stood out is that he didn’t look fast in the sense that he was rushing. he was “just” extremely deliberate in his movements.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
I noticed at first I was spending what seemed like a lot of time looking for the end of the string, so after weaving one ahead, I leave the end of the string near the hoop (don't pull the slack) until after I pull tension.
I pull most of the slack thru on crosses. I do stick the end of the string into a grommet hole rather than letting it fall to the floor.
 

Strawbewwy

Rookie
I think both the stringer and machines contribute to the time... weaving faster of course will shave time off, but the machine helps save time in various ways too

if you can save 2 seconds on every string you pull, even on the more open string beds like a 14x18 totaling 32 pulls, that would shave you down a whole minute

Drop weight is definitely the slowest as you have to be careful letting down the weight, adjust, turn again, drop, rinse and repeat

going crank will already save you more than 2 seconds on each pull, you just go cranking all the way til it stops

and when you go full electric..., trigger the pull and you can start worry about something else, for example, you can start getting ready to thread/weave the next string, etc
 

djNEiGht

Hall of Fame
on the mains I keep the tail of the string in my hand while working on one side and the other side the string is one ahead with a couple inches feed through the grommet. Then I alternate as the mains get done.

For crosses, I string one ahead and pass the string a couple inches as well.

I wonder if stringing on a glide clamp system that the potential time could be lower because there is just one action to release and clamp where as swivel base (even on gravity release) there is a little bit more movement.
 

CosmosMpower

Hall of Fame
I can string a multi/syn gut on a 16x19 in just under 20 mins on a Prince Neos 1000. Not sure how much faster if I had a Bairdo or something like that.
 

LocNetMonster

Professional
... is there something about the machine that let's him string super fast?
Weaving crosses is your likely time-suck. Watch videos of stringers and how they push their weaves. Once you can duplicate the way they thread on every cross, you will be amazed how fast you can finish a stick compared to when you first started. My first racquet took my about four frustrating hours. Now, I can comfortably finish a stick in under 30 min.


But my stringer can get my racquet done in 15 minutes.
What racquet and strings? I might be able to hit that time with NXT in 14x16 stick now on Neos. On a DW, that would be probably 22 minutes due to having to wait for the arm to settle.
 

beltsman

Legend
Weaving crosses is your likely time-suck. Watch videos of stringers and how they push their weaves. Once you can duplicate the way they thread on every cross, you will be amazed how fast you can finish a stick compared to when you first started. My first racquet took my about four frustrating hours. Now, I can comfortably finish a stick in under 30 min.




What racquet and strings? I might be able to hit that time with NXT in 14x16 stick now on Neos. On a DW, that would be probably 22 minutes due to having to wait for the arm to settle.
Speed MP, gut/cream
 

StringGuruMRT

Semi-Pro
I can string a multi/syn gut on a 16x19 in just under 20 mins on a Prince Neos 1000. Not sure how much faster if I had a Bairdo or something like that.
Neos is one of the fastest machines to string on! Baiardo is much slower as you have to wait for the tension head. Constant pull machines are more for consistency than speed. I have to really hustle to get a racquet done in 15 min on Baiardo, but when I strung on a Neos, I was averaging 12-13 minutes.
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
My fastest string job was probably with my old drop-weight LaserFibre machine that included floating clamps. Working with that machine was much more tedious than with the Gamma Prog 2 ELS I use now. I never wanted to do more than 2 or 3 in a day using that drop-weight rig, but now if I have to knock out 4 or 5 in a day, it's no big deal using my Gamma.

I could probably rush a stringing in about 20 minutes if I needed to using the electric machine, but those emergencies never happen anymore for me. I like the Prog 2 ELS for its fixed clamps and constant pull, but overall it gives me a much easier time with stringing at higher volume. Not necessarily faster, but easier I guess.
 

Wonie88

New User
I average 20 min per frame at a leisurely pace. There’s no drop in quality when the pace goes to 15 minutes.

Our machines have 3 settings for the pull speed. I use the medium speed because it keeps the rhythm with my hands/clamps in sync. I always thought the fastest pull might be harsh on some strings.

Here are my priorities for a speedy/quality string job.

1. Smoothly functioning clamps
2. All tools readily accessible
3. Weave one ahead on the crosses
4. Thread a main on each side and pull them back to back(less spinning of the tray).
5. When doing multiple frames for the same customer- prep all the frames/string before starting.
 

AceyMan

Semi-Pro
Also...drop weights just take some time because you have to find the sweet spot
... but not if you're using a Stringway 8-B .

With a 2-piece or standard 1-one piece I'm usually around 35 minutes.

A chunk of that time is letting the bar settle for strings with a lot of "late stretch" in them. Those may be polys or multis. I can't imagine how innacurate the resulting stringbed would be on a lockout with one of those strings. Eww.

fwiw, natural gut actually settles quickly despite being the least stiff string around. That stuff is just amazing.

/Acey
 
Neos is one of the fastest machines to string on! Baiardo is much slower as you have to wait for the tension head. Constant pull machines are more for consistency than speed. I have to really hustle to get a racquet done in 15 min on Baiardo, but when I strung on a Neos, I was averaging 12-13 minutes.
Damn, that's some insane speed! I have a NEOS 1000 w/ Wise and my fastest was 26 min. These days I listen to podcasts and leisurely take my time at around 35-40 min (I only string my own rackets and not for money/professionally).
 

JRW911

New User
I used to string racquets for a living back in the day. For kicks, a co-worker wanted to test my speed one day, so I grabbed a POG mid (14x18), some Prince syn gut 17 and mounted it on our Babolat Star 3. 10 minutes and 6 seconds later it was fully strung and unmounted.
That being said, I usually took a little more time and averaged 4 racquets per hour, so a quality 15 minutes string job is definitely doable.
Like someone said above, it's all about efficiency of movement and being able to weave crosses lightning quick.
 

djNEiGht

Hall of Fame
I was at best getting the PA with TB 16 about 24 minutes and the PA with RPMB 16 about 22. I hope that in time that I can get my average down to about 20 minutes.

I pre=cut all my string and it helped with the turn over of each racquet.

I got the same batch to do today...it's x10. Wish I could get it done faster but I am happy with my quality as well as the players.
 

djNEiGht

Hall of Fame
I used to string racquets for a living back in the day. For kicks, a co-worker wanted to test my speed one day, so I grabbed a POG mid (14x18), some Prince syn gut 17 and mounted it on our Babolat Star 3. 10 minutes and 6 seconds later it was fully strung and unmounted.
That being said, I usually took a little more time and averaged 4 racquets per hour, so a quality 15 minutes string job is definitely doable.
Like someone said above, it's all about efficiency of movement and being able to weave crosses lightning quick.
I think I hit under 20 on those with the same string. if only stringing a capped prestige was like that. ahahahah
 

LocNetMonster

Professional
I wonder if stringing on a glide clamp system that the potential time could be lower because there is just one action to release and clamp where as swivel base (even on gravity release) there is a little bit more movement.
I have a glide rail system. Took me 26 min. to do a Prince Bandit 105 at my normal pace. I probably could get it under 24 with an electronic head and more deliberate movement using rails. I think swivel clamps would be faster since it seems easier to set the clamps while doing crosses.
 

JRW911

New User
Yeah, stringing racquets with CAP grommets sucks. I very much dislike stringing my Head Pro Tour 2.0s especially since it's an 18x20 and I use a full bed of poly.
 

djNEiGht

Hall of Fame
so x10 racquets yesterday. Lets just say
cutting/removing strings
cutting sets from reel
removing old OG
45 minutes.

even with that I'm slow. ahahah
 

StringGuruMRT

Semi-Pro
Damn, that's some insane speed! I have a NEOS 1000 w/ Wise and my fastest was 26 min. These days I listen to podcasts and leisurely take my time at around 35-40 min (I only string my own rackets and not for money/professionally).
Yeah back when I was stringing on the NEOS I could fly! There was just nothing getting in the way, and I could hand crank that baby faster than any electric constant pull tension head!
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
so x10 racquets yesterday. Lets just say
cutting/removing strings
cutting sets from reel
removing old OG
45 minutes.

even with that I'm slow. ahahah
10 rackets in 45 minutes. That's about 4 minutes per racket on the average. Pretty damn good if you ask me. LOL
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
but i didn't note they were strung....ahahahah
OK well then that much makes sense. I assume when you said you cut string from the reel you strung them. I guess you could have laid the coils of string on the floor.

EDIT: Like they say when something sounds unreasonable it usually is.
 

lefty10spro

Semi-Pro
Speed does not mean that your stringer is taking shortcuts. Like others have mention it always comes down to how fast you can weave. With almost 40 years of professional stringing experience I can still push weave very, very fast. Back in the mid 80s I talked to a French stringer at the ATP Cincy tourney. He was part of the Babolat team and the dude was sewing machine the crosses if you know what I mean. I asked him why he was using this incredibly slow method. He said it was better for the gut. I call BS - I just think he never learned to push or pull weave.
 

JRW911

New User
I'm surprised he was able to make the Babolat stringing team while stringing that slowly. I've always assumed the stringing room (especially at the beginning of tournaments) was a mad house and there is immense pressure to get them done as quickly as possible.
 

Herb

Semi-Pro
The last time I strung on a drop weight I was around 25 minutes. I am around 20 or so on a crank. Without gravity release clamps 15-16 minutes. With gravity release clamps 12-14 minutes. This is assuming racquet is mounted, string is cut and ready to go, and all I am doing is putting the string in the racquet.
 
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