How much lower can I go on a poly cross?

Ben42

Semi-Pro
Right now I'm stringing a full bed of multi in my racquet at 58lbs. I'd like to try a multi with a poly cross. If the poly is pretty stiff, how much lower a tension can I get away with?

Would 55/48 be too much? Any racquet head distortion with those tensions you think?
 
D

Deleted member 120290

Guest
If you hit hard with lots of spin, poly cross will eat thru multi mains in 1-2 hours.
 

0d1n

Hall of Fame
I would not go for more than 2, maybe 2.5 kg difference max.
So, a max of 5 - 6 lbs. I know some others are playing with much bigger differences, but I like my racquets and want them to stay usable in the long term. I also see no practical benefit other than having a "special setup" and maybe getting some attention that way :).
 

TennisCJC

Legend
5 lbs difference is what most shops suggest as the max difference. I usually go with 4 or 5 lbs less on poly cross with multi mains.
 

QuadCam

Professional
I've gone as high as 14 pounds in a gut/poly hybrid. 62 on the gut mains and 48 for the poly crosses. It played very well.
 

naturallight

Semi-Pro
I had some racquet distortion around 15 lbs I believe...something like 57/42.

The lower you go on your crosses, the less friction you'll have on the mains and the more durable the setup will be.
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
I routinely do 20lbs differences with the mains at high tension. Racket dies squash. No issues over a year or more. Some frames have had that differential for over a year with the same strings

No issues
 

ChicagoJack

Hall of Fame
1. I'm at 62/42 on a heavily modified Wilson 105s 16x15, laced with 16g Wilson Revolve.

2. Somebody mentioned seeing no advantage to stringing beyond a 5-6 lb. differential. The benefit is that friction on the mains is reduced as cross tension is reduced. However, if the mains slide too far, and lack sufficient stored elastic energy to snap back, then the mains will just stay stuck out of place, and that is the worst case scenario for spin. So, as tension of the X's is reduced, the mains will slide farther, and that means more tension might be required in the mains. Since it is illegal to lace your strings without interweaving them (aka Spaghetti Stringing) extreme tension differentials are the next best thing.

3. Hoop distortion makes my racquets 1/4 inch shorter when strung. I think that's a nice bennie actually. Swingweight is reduced (or added) by 8-10 digits for every .25" of frame lenght. I am a big fan of lead in the hoop, and that reduction gives me more room to customize.

4. I have 6 frames, all strung this way for about a little over a year. No problems at all. FYI, I will snap 17g Revolve in about 3-5 hours. I don't snap the 16g, but restring at around 12-15 hours of play.
 
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WYK

Hall of Fame
I have a 95S that has 42# hurricane mains and 30# cyber flash crosses(the spin is ridiculous). An NCode something or other I recently did with 58# Tech blk code mains and 44# XP crosses. The sticks are still 27" long. I would wager the higher the mains tension, the more distortion you will see when the crosses string loose. My main stick is an M3.0, 39# Hurricane mains and 33# XP crosses. I tend to stick with stiff mains, and cross with whatever soft slick poly I have laying around(which is usually cyber flash).
 

Ben42

Semi-Pro
I've tried it, and I came back. :) It was nice on serves and most groundstrokes, but not at the net or if was put under pressure.
 

ultradr

Legend
1. I'm at 62/42 on a heavily modified Wilson 105s 16x15, laced with 16g Wilson Revolve.

2. Somebody mentioned seeing no advantage to stringing beyond a 5-6 lb. differential. The benefit is that friction on the mains is reduced as cross tension is reduced. However, if the mains slide too far, and lack sufficient stored elastic energy to snap back, then the mains will just stay stuck out of place, and that is the worst case scenario for spin. So, as tension of the X's is reduced, the mains will slide farther, and that means more tension might be required in the mains. Since it is illegal to lace your strings without interweaving them (aka Spaghetti Stringing) extreme tension differentials are the next best thing.

3. Hoop distortion makes my racquets 1/4 inch shorter when strung. I think that's a nice bennie actually. Swingweight is reduced (or added) by 8-10 digits for every .25" of frame lenght. I am a big fan of lead in the hoop, and that reduction gives me more room to customize.

4. I have 6 frames, all strung this way for about a little over a year. No problems at all. FYI, I will snap 17g Revolve in about 3-5 hours. I don't snap the 16g, but restring at around 12-15 hours of play.
What would you say about the feel of this set up? compared to full bed multi or full bed polys?

I am now experimenting 63/50 (gut/poly) and its feel is something I never had before. It feels medium firm sometimes, then again some trampoline feel is there. I have had 63/60 with same setup in the past. Maybe the feel is dominated by the cross string.

So far, it seems to feel like worst of 2 worlds: no ball packetting of gut, lack of crispiness due to low tension poly.:confused:

But for some reasons, I seem to play better with this set up. ;) It's just the feel that is foreign and ... well, dislike.
 

oble

Hall of Fame
I've tried it, and I came back. :) It was nice on serves and most groundstrokes, but not at the net or if was put under pressure.
Was it the multi/poly at 55/48 that you mentioned in the OP? What was wrong with it at the net and when you were under pressure?
 

Ben42

Semi-Pro
Was it the multi/poly at 55/48 that you mentioned in the OP? What was wrong with it at the net and when you were under pressure?
Sorry, I was responding to geca's post about stringing a full bed of poly at 32lbs. I've tried that and the ball was not consistent enough to be controllable for me at those low tensions. Sometimes it would fly, sometimes it would die in the bottom of the net.
 

WYK

Hall of Fame
Sorry, I was responding to geca's post about stringing a full bed of poly at 32lbs. I've tried that and the ball was not consistent enough to be controllable for me at those low tensions. Sometimes it would fly, sometimes it would die in the bottom of the net.
I have found as little as 20 lbs to work well on several racquets I have been using lately. I currently string at 38 ish mains and 33 for the crosses depending on the string and stick. I did, however, find that my PD Team from 2005 ish does not like low tensions very much. As PD's go, this one isn't nearly as powerful and stiff as the new models, and it plays much more plush. The lowest I could string it to get anything that felt comfy and consistent to play with was in the low 30's, and even then I think I prefer it in the high 30's. The woofer system seems to be doing something that makes an ELT feel just too odd and muted and mushy. And this from a guy who likes a muted feel. I think it would take a full bed of something like Hurricane or RPM to get it to groove at low tensions. In general, though, I find an ELT to give me insane control from drop shots, to volleys, to groundstrokes. But on most of my sticks, you tend to lose a lot of power with an ELT, so you usually work harder for flat serves. But the good news is you can now put a lot of action on your second serves.
 

jbTennissee

New User
For a guts mains + copoly crosses hybrid, I think a large tension difference is fine. Last year I strung a few times with VS Touch 15L at 66 lbs and Weiss Cannon B5E at 52 Lbs, in a Wilson BLX Pro Open (16x19). I liked the high tension on gut to depower it. It hit very nicely, still had good feel from the gut. I never noticed any deformation of the hoop.

I think if you used that kind of tension difference with the same string for mains and crosses, it might deform or break the frame? But with a much less stiff main, it won't exert enough pull to deform the racquet.
 

Pmasterfunk

Hall of Fame
I've done a 10lb difference in a hybrid on one of my racquets, and have seen no significant distortion compared to the full poly in another.
 
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