How much string should be cut from a 200 m string reel for a 97 sq in frame?

How much string should I cut from my Hyper G 16 reel (200 m) for a 97 sq. inch Wilson ProStaff RF97A- going for 1 piece (2 knots) string job with a full bed of Hyper G?

Most of the stringers usually suggest to go for 40 feet, but I guess that recommendation might be based off of a 100 sq inch frame.
 
Actually, he suggested me that I should go less than 40' as I have two 97 sq in frames and one 95 sq in frame (all 16 X 19 pattern). But, I don't know how less can I go for the 97 sq in.
 

1HBHfanatic

Legend
-dont cut the string!!
-put your name on the REEL and give it to the stringer
-they will be responsible for getting you the reel back
-i can string a PS racquet with 34-35' on 1pc, and 36-37' on 2pc,, but then again, ive been doing this for many years now
-some stringers might need a bit more/less, depending on their own personal experience and know how
 
I've been doing that for a few years now, but now I feel I want to start stringing my own rackets. I got some pointers from my stringer but he said that I could go below 40' for my 97 sq in frames.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
I have records for the PS 97, which says 35'-36'. Pull the length and do not cut in two. Install the SS without tensioning to make sure you have at least 4"-8" extra. Now install and tension the mains. One piece requires an ATW and requires 35'. Tie off the mains. Now cut the string and start from the top with a starting knot. I probably could have done 2 piece with 35', but being cautious.
 
Thanks for the detailed instructions! Appreciate it!
I checked up the Wilson stringing guide, almost similar to what you said, just doesn't exactly tell how much string is actually needed for the 97 sq in frame. According to what you and others have implied, it seems like 36' seems like a good starting point.
 

esm

Hall of Fame
one of the guys i string for uses V13 PS97, he only uses syn gut and i can get away with 9' for the SS and 23' for the LS. poly should add 1' per side.
 

OldManStan

Rookie
This is the most fool-proof way I’ve found to measure strings.

We’ll use a 16x19 racquet and polyester strings as the example.

Mains:
Measure out 16.5 lengths from the top of the frame to the throat. You should have the perfect amount. For synthetic gut, 16.25 should be plenty.

Crosses: Measure out 19.5 lengths from the widest part of the crosses. I use a starting clamp to start the crosses and tension the first cross after 4-5 crosses. A starting knot is OK as well if you prefer that method.
 

GuilhermeG

Rookie
This is the most fool-proof way I’ve found to measure strings.

We’ll use a 16x19 racquet and polyester strings as the example.

Mains:
Measure out 16.5 lengths from the top of the frame to the throat. You should have the perfect amount. For synthetic gut, 16.25 should be plenty.

Crosses: Measure out 19.5 lengths from the widest part of the crosses. I use a starting clamp to start the crosses and tension the first cross after 4-5 crosses. A starting knot is OK as well if you prefer that method.
I use the same method, but I actually go 20/22 measures when I string an 18x20 racquet.
I recently had the bad experience of trying a lower tension and running out of string on the last cross, so now I'm being more cautious whenever I try something new. Might go for 23 or 24 lenghts for crosses next time.
 
This is as straightforward as it can get. But with just 0.5 length more, is there enough string length to go around outside of the frame and then through the grommets?
 
I use the same method, but I actually go 20/22 measures when I string an 18x20 racquet.
I recently had the bad experience of trying a lower tension and running out of string on the last cross, so now I'm being more cautious whenever I try something new. Might go for 23 or 24 lenghts for crosses next time.

I am also concerned about this as well, otherwise this method is really simple!
 

nochuola

Rookie
I assume you'll be stringing the same racquet multiple times in the future. You can use this time to find out exactly how much you need. Measure a safe amount that would definitely be enough (40' or 20' + 20', or 4 of your wingspans...etc), doesn't really matter what method you want to go with. String the racquet and keep whatever you end up cutting after stringing. Measure the extra and subtract from whatever you original had, and now you know exactly how much you need next time (obviously add back some length for pulling tension).
 

Curtennis

Semi-Pro
The most important thing you can do is just cut into what’s going to be an even number into the roll.
If you have 200 feet, why not just cut 40 feet every time? That’s 5 jobs.
Maybe I’m just dense but I’m not sure what cutting 37 is going to get you. Another 15 feet? Maybe enough to do some crosses? Sounds like way more trouble than it’s worth.

Edit: 200m roll… same point still applies 656 total feet. 38 feet gets you one more full string job. 37 feet adds no additional value and 39, you may as well stay at 40.
 
Haha no, that's a completely valid question.

I usually go for a full bed of poly, but I would like to try out Hybrids. Second reason is that I have two 97 sq in rackets and one 95 sq in racket. A 1 piece (2 knot) string job with 40' length, which I believe is usually recommended for a 100 sq in, ends up wasting a lot of string especially for the 95 sq in, so I'm just trying to capitalize on that.
 

nochuola

Rookie
Definitely intend to do that, but I want to know what should be the starting length- I know usually it's the 40'.
I'd say, for this first time, don't overthink it. Whatever extra you waste this one time is going to be miniscule in the long run. For convenience, I suggest the wing span method. If you are fairly regular sized, 4 wing span is a pretty close estimation for 20' ~ 21'. For your reference, for my VCP 97, I use 3 2/3 (4 minus an arm length) for my mains, and 3 1/3 (3 plus an arm length) for my crosses. I did some quick calculations, that comes out to a little under 21' for mains, and a little under 19' for crosses.

While I was typing this, @Curtennis came in with a good point. No matter how you measure, there's not much you can do when you reach then end and whatever is left is not enough to string anything. The only caveat is a 200m reel isn't guaranteed to actually be 200m because of QC issues. So even if you measure say 5.88m everytime (so aiming for 34 equal cuts) you still might end up with an unusable length at the end. The moral of the story is, the overhead is probably way too small to overthink about unless you plan on running a full stringing business.
 
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If you have 200 feet, why not just cut 40 feet every time?

Edit: 200m roll… same point still applies 656 total feet. 38 feet gets you one more full string job. 37 feet adds no additional value and 39, you may as well stay at 40.
You can easily get one extra racket and 1 set of mains or crosses out of a reel by using the correct length of string.

let’s say you only use a certain string for crosses, that’s even more. Because you can get at least 38 lengths out of it vs the 32 you’d get if you take the standard 20’ that a half set would be.

why wouldn’t one do that?
 

AceyMan

Semi-Pro
String the racquet and keep whatever you end up cutting after stringing.
I cut off what is *left past the tension head* when pulling the tie-off string and measure that as the surplus. Don't fool yourself and measure what you had left after snipping at the knot. (I don't think I need to explain how that will be fail :cool: ... )

/Acey

I don't mind bridging so with expensive reels I will go even shorter and expect to bridge the last pulls. (I always have two "last pulls" bc I always use a starting clamp.)
 
You can easily get one extra racket and 1 set of mains or crosses out of a reel by using the correct length of string.

let’s say you only use a certain string for crosses, that’s even more. Because you can get at least 38 lengths out of it vs the 32 you’d get if you take the standard 20’ that a half set would be.

why wouldn’t one do that?
I second that. Kinda thinking all this myself.
 
I cut off what is *left past the tension head* when pulling the tie-off string and measure that as the surplus. Don't fool yourself and measure what you had left after snipping at the knot. (I don't think I need to explain how that will be fail :cool: ... )

/Acey

I don't mind bridging so with expensive reels I will go even shorter and expect to bridge the last pulls. (I always have two "last pulls" bc I always use a starting clamp.)
A great idea to factor in. Tbh I haven't thought about that.
 
I've strung these with 34' using an ATW pattern. I have an Alpha machine with a Wise tension head. If you're using a dropweight, you'll need more. I probably could have used 33 1/2', but didn't want to cut it that close. This was using a poly. If I had used Babolat Synthetic, I'm sure I could get by with 33'. It would be close though.
 
My advice, which is free and worth every penny. I give refunds to boot.

1. Measure everything in metres. Much easier to calculate, fewer errors.
2. Figure out your wingspan, arms spread, fingertip to fingertip. This will allow you to very quickly measure out long pieces. Figure out your hand span, and you can whip out a piece of almost any length in just a few seconds.
3. For a racquet you are going to string more than once, disassemble the strings carefully and measure the pieces. Add about 40 cm for knots on main, about 30 cm for crosses. This is because you can tie off on the top and not waste much for the first starting knot on the crosses. Write it all down.
4. Keep a piece of each type in case you need to bridge with your starting clamp.
5. Subtract about 5% for multi and synthetic gut since they stretch and you'll need a little less.

As mentioned earlier, if you are careful and a little frugal, you should be able to squeeze at least on additional full stringing, maybe that and a hybrid piece, from each reel.

Good luck.
 
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