How much tennis is your body used too before you feel sore the next day?

FiReFTW

Hall of Fame
#1
I was quite suprized that I felt sore yesterday tho im fine today, well it was my lower calves near achilles tendon mostly, and maybe very slight lower back soreness... its interesting that my shoulder was completely fine from all the serving.

But then again im certainly not used to nearly this much tennis at once so im sure my body would need to adapt to so much strain before it could be no problem just like when you raise ur gym training by a lot and feel sore the next day, but in 1 or 2 weeks ur body adapts.

Anyway I had 1 hour point play in a group lesson on friday, played singles more or less on 1 court, and 1 hour lesson with my coach which was medium intense, and did some fitness work at home later for about an hour.
Then on saturday I had a match which lasted 3 sets and then my friend unexpectedly called me if I want to play some tennis because he got free when he usually is very busy with work, so I went to play with him aswell and first hit and warmed up for 30 mins then did some games where you hit the ball into the ground and the other player on the other side has to get it before it bounces and hit it into the ground etc.. and then we also played 2 sets and also played 3 tie breaks to 7.

I kind of thought going to play for the 2nd time was a bit overdoing it but I just have a really hard time saying no to tennis and always crave it so much, and I guess it was a bit too much afterall.

So how much punishment can you guys take before you feel some soreness?
 

Curious

Hall of Fame
#3
I was quite suprized that I felt sore yesterday tho im fine today, well it was my lower calves near achilles tendon mostly, and maybe very slight lower back soreness... its interesting that my shoulder was completely fine from all the serving.

But then again im certainly not used to nearly this much tennis at once so im sure my body would need to adapt to so much strain before it could be no problem just like when you raise ur gym training by a lot and feel sore the next day, but in 1 or 2 weeks ur body adapts.

Anyway I had 1 hour point play in a group lesson on friday, played singles more or less on 1 court, and 1 hour lesson with my coach which was medium intense, and did some fitness work at home later for about an hour.
Then on saturday I had a match which lasted 3 sets and then my friend unexpectedly called me if I want to play some tennis because he got free when he usually is very busy with work, so I went to play with him aswell and first hit and warmed up for 30 mins then did some games where you hit the ball into the ground and the other player on the other side has to get it before it bounces and hit it into the ground etc.. and then we also played 2 sets and also played 3 tie breaks to 7.

I kind of thought going to play for the 2nd time was a bit overdoing it but I just have a really hard time saying no to tennis and always crave it so much, and I guess it was a bit too much afterall.

So how much punishment can you guys take before you feel some soreness?
That’s usually how you end up injuring yourself.
 
#4
Ahh I missed the days when I played to the sore point the next day! It had to be 4+ hours of mostly singles or very intensive doubles.

For the last two years I have had any body sores from tennis!!!!
 
#7
That’s usually how you end up injuring yourself.
This is inline with my belief and observation.

Because of this belief/understanding, I put emphasis on being efficient/natural with my strokes and running and learning as much as possible. Everything has to square away before I press on hard!
 
#8
I'm good for 10 minutes.




Still trying to get up to twice a day. I think the deadlifts and squats are improving my recovery as i'm not as used up as in the past. Played twice yesterday and my knees and lower back are stiff as hell, could have stretched and rolled things out last night but got lazy.
 

IowaGuy

Hall of Fame
#10
I was quite suprized that I felt sore yesterday tho im fine today, well it was my lower calves near achilles tendon mostly
Careful with soreness around the achilles tendon.

I have a middle-aged friend who tore his achilles and was out of tennis for almost a year (his movement on the court still isn't great). He said it was sore from overplaying, but he ignored it and tried to play through the soreness.

I had a partial tear in my lower calf last year ("tennis leg"), this is another tennis-related injury to be aware of. I now stretch my calves and achilles religiously.

Food for thought...
 

FiReFTW

Hall of Fame
#11
Careful with soreness around the achilles tendon.

I have a middle-aged friend who tore his achilles and was out of tennis for almost a year (his movement on the court still isn't great). He said it was sore from overplaying, but he ignored it and tried to play through the soreness.

I had a partial tear in my lower calf last year ("tennis leg"), this is another tennis-related injury to be aware of. I now stretch my calves and achilles religiously.

Food for thought...
Yeah good advice, a competitive girl I know that plays tourneys also tore her achilles tendon few months ago.

Don't worry when it comes to this kind of stuff im rather safe than sorry, thats why I skipped my group tennis today, even tho I barely feel anything today.

Its not actually achilles tho its more of side muscles, just around that area, but more side, exactly here where I drew:



Is this a common area of soreness when it comes to tennis related activity?
 

Curious

Hall of Fame
#12
Careful with soreness around the achilles tendon.

I have a middle-aged friend who tore his achilles and was out of tennis for almost a year (his movement on the court still isn't great). He said it was sore from overplaying, but he ignored it and tried to play through the soreness.

I had a partial tear in my lower calf last year ("tennis leg"), this is another tennis-related injury to be aware of. I now stretch my calves and achilles religiously.

Food for thought...
Sure you don’t want this happen to you! And it can happen to anyone anytime.

 
#13
When I started around 40, I would play 4-5 times a week doing about 3 hours each time between matches, practice, and just hitting with people. This was with doing at least 45 minutes of working out too 5 times a week. Never really was sore. Now I play 3 times per week doing about 2 hours each session of practice and drills, and only do a bit of walking for cardio a few times a week. Trying ot push myself without as much training I end up sore often. I tease about my tennis warm up now being dynamic stretches, sprints, and 400mg of Ibuprofen.
 

FiReFTW

Hall of Fame
#14
When I started around 40, I would play 4-5 times a week doing about 3 hours each time between matches, practice, and just hitting with people. This was with doing at least 45 minutes of working out too 5 times a week. Never really was sore. Now I play 3 times per week doing about 2 hours each session of practice and drills, and only do a bit of walking for cardio a few times a week. Trying ot push myself without as much training I end up sore often. I tease about my tennis warm up now being dynamic stretches, sprints, and 400mg of Ibuprofen.
How old are you now.
 

IowaGuy

Hall of Fame
#18
Could feel like a gunshot.
My "tennis leg" injury felt like I got hit hard in the lower calf by a tennis ball while I was doing a serve.

Granted, we were the only ones playing on the courts at the time, so it was very confusing!

Luckily, it was a minor tear and I was back to tennis in a few weeks (and now back to full speed), but it gave me a good scare!
 
#20
So you went from 15h tennis per week + 3.5h workouts per week and feeling great and not sore to 6h tennis per week with a bit of light workouts and need to eat painkillers, hmmmm, what the heck
Welcome to aging. Lots of other stuff goes into it, but I think most find something similar along the way.
 
#21
@FiReFTW i guage myself more about how many sessions i have a week. Although this can change if im sick or something. I dont bounce back as well then

In one hit i dont like to go over 2.5hrs of singles (gotta play more in league tho), and i usually have 3x hits a week.

The thing is, being 27, my body bounces back well. I had a knee injury a month ago that probably would have been an ACL if i was over 40, tennis elbow, and a twisted ankle all in the last 6 months. I mostly use heatpacks and then research what to do. I.e. most tendon issues seem to be resolved via "building strength at the end range of motion".

The knee injury kept me off the court for a week, and then a week of only light hitting etc. I think doing nothing is just as bad as going hardcore when you have an injury. Playing tennis strengthens you, just dont go too crazy without the rest period to rebuild. Ankle sprains i just strap it for a week or so after, and tennis elbow i use that bar thing you stretch (i.e. so the forearm is elongated and resisting. .. builds strength at end range of motion)

Dunno, maybe ill need to be more careful in the future. That was my first knee injury, they dont seem good. Im not gonna stupidly chase balls down anymore and try to stop instantly while turning lol... just keep running into the opponents court
 
#22
I have yet to get sore from tennis since my comeback, but haven’t played any matches either, most in a day was 1 hour of light hitting + 45 min of moderate-intense hitting.

However I was extremely sore the day after I started exercising again (Sept. 24th at 188 lbs), maxed out at 3 push ups, 12 crunches and 10 min of stop/start jogging.

If I had to estimate I’d say if I played an intense 2 hour match my legs would be sore the next day.
 
#24
The deadlifts and squats have allowed me to push off with MASSIVE POWER to adjust to high speed incoming artillery from opponents, unfortunately this "added motion" is causing other parts to hurt. So now I got more to do to use this new quad technology. I think its good. But does anyone know what movements in particular are bad for the hips?
 

mcs1970

Professional
#25
Everybody is different. You know your own situation best.

Even if you feel fine, mix in some rest and some low impact exercise days (such as swimming). Your brain will revolt now because a sport you love is as addictive as any drug. However, 20 years from now your knees will thank you, and you will be able to play tennis at a relatively high level much, much longer.
 
#26
Everybody is different. You know your own situation best.

Even if you feel fine, mix in some rest and some low impact exercise days (such as swimming). Your brain will revolt now because a sport you love is as addictive as any drug. However, 20 years from now your knees will thank you, and you will be able to play tennis at a relatively high level much, much longer.

Is there any stats about how ones use their knees and the effects they get 20 years later?

If there was any stats, I would think they come from pro's. Many pros use their knees, wrist, body parts extremely in their careers and even run into injury issues as we see alot, they would be the firsts to suffer health issues in their later days. But, are they? The former pros like McEnroe, Gilbert, etc.?
 

mcs1970

Professional
#27
Is there any stats about how ones use their knees and the effects they get 20 years later?

If there was any stats, I would think they come from pro's. Many pros use their knees, wrist, body parts extremely in their careers and even run into injury issues as we see alot, they would be the firsts to suffer health issues in their later days. But, are they? The former pros like McEnroe, Gilbert, etc.?
Pros a bit different since they get prime medical treatment/knowledge (both preventive and surgical) throughout their lives. Plus who knows how many of them are walking around with replacement knees. So one might get a false sense of confidence looking at the pros.

You do hear about hip injuries with pros. Some blame the open stance as causing more injuries. At the same time, I've heard some others saying that studies have not found a definite link between open stance shots and more injuries. So even there, there is a gray area.

For most rec players, wearing down of knee cartilage is real. So just be careful, and use discretion in your younger days. Not just to ensure being able to play at a good level much longer, but also to have a better quality of life much longer.
 
#29
Pros a bit different since they get prime medical treatment/knowledge (both preventive and surgical) throughout their lives. Plus who knows how many of them are walking around with replacement knees. So one might get a false sense of confidence looking at the pros.

You do hear about hip injuries with pros. Some blame the open stance as causing more injuries. At the same time, I've heard some others saying that studies have not found a definite link between open stance shots and more injuries. So even there, there is a gray area.

For most rec players, wearing down of knee cartilage is real. So just be careful, and use discretion in your younger days. Not just to ensure being able to play at a good level much longer, but also to have a better quality of life much longer.
It probably depends a lot on diet too... they say health (and abz) is made in the kitchen, and over the years it would all add up if you have the right building blocks to rebuild your body after bashing it up 3x a week on a tennis court
 
#30
Pros a bit different since they get prime medical treatment/knowledge (both preventive and surgical) throughout their lives. Plus who knows how many of them are walking around with replacement knees. So one might get a false sense of confidence looking at the pros.

You do hear about hip injuries with pros. Some blame the open stance as causing more injuries. At the same time, I've heard some others saying that studies have not found a definite link between open stance shots and more injuries. So even there, there is a gray area.

For most rec players, wearing down of knee cartilage is real. So just be careful, and use discretion in your younger days. Not just to ensure being able to play at a good level much longer, but also to have a better quality of life much longer.
You're saying all the common sense stuff. It doesn't answer or propose anything. :)

Sure, pros for their wealth get top medical treatments but since they're also well known shouldn't we be hearing a dozen cases or at least something out of thousands of pros over the years? Shouldn't we have heard health comments from Michael Chang, John M, etc.? There's virtually nothing.

In football there's widespread news on brain injury for ex-pros.

It's difficult to gauge rec players. Rec players are all over the place with everything. The other day I saw one young guy got ankle injury from merely turning 360 to look at a lob! Imagine if his wife or someone unfamiliar with tennis asked him how he got the injury, they would probably get scared from tennis!! It's d@mn comical.
 

mcs1970

Professional
#31
You're saying all the common sense stuff. It doesn't answer or propose anything. :)

Sure, pros for their wealth get top medical treatments but since they're also well known shouldn't we be hearing a dozen cases or at least something out of thousands of pros over the years? Shouldn't we have heard health comments from Michael Chang, John M, etc.? There's virtually nothing.

In football there's widespread news on brain injury for ex-pros.

It's difficult to gauge rec players. Rec players are all over the place with everything. The other day I saw one young guy got ankle injury from merely turning 360 to look at a lob! Imagine if his wife or someone unfamiliar with tennis asked him how he got the injury, they would probably get scared from tennis!! It's d@mn comical.
Football is a contact sport with men built like trucks running around and colliding with each other. No amount of preventive knowledge or surgery can help there. :) It has to be a chore just getting out of bed the morning after a game. If you feel a rec player who overdoses on Tennis should be okay based on comparisons you're looking from pros, that's fine.



I'm just going by what I and my racquetball buddies who overdid it in our younger days without a regiment of stretching and rest are going through now. No...we're not quitting our sports. Too stubborn to do it, even though my doc has asked me to do it multiple times. However, each time my knee swells up or aches I wish I'd gone a bit easier then. No amount of stretching or rest now can make up for that lost time.
 
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#33
F :) It has to be a chore just getting out of bed the morning after a game. If you feel a rec player who overdoses on Tennis should be okay based on comparisons you're looking from pros, that's fine.
.
I don't feel one way or another.

I was only asking for empirical data and suggesting that if there existed any it should have been coming from the tennis pro's who have used their legs, knees extensively. So far, I haven't seen anything.

My grandmother and my mother didn't play tennis or any sports at all, but their legs and knees are severely painful in their advance age. So, I lean toward how ones take care of their body, barring extreme cases like ...10 hr/day tennis. For the rest of us, it will be most likely fine (if you know how to take care.)
 
#34
I don't feel one way or another.

I was only asking for empirical data and suggesting that if there existed any it should have been coming from the tennis pro's who have used their legs, knees extensively. So far, I haven't seen anything.

My grandmother and my mother didn't play tennis or any sports at all, but their legs and knees are severely painful in their advance age. So, I lean toward how ones take care of their body, barring extreme cases like ...10 hr/day tennis. For the rest of us, it will be most likely fine (if you know how to take care.)
Some old thread on TTW talking about Lendl, Connors, and Becker all having multiple hip replacement surgery. Knee info much more scarce. So maybe hip is what folks should be more concerned about? If the 80s guys who didn't experience as much torque as the guys the past decade did, are having replacement parts, wonder about the future health of the big 3 down the road.
 
#40
Is there any stats about how ones use their knees and the effects they get 20 years later?

If there was any stats, I would think they come from pro's. Many pros use their knees, wrist, body parts extremely in their careers and even run into injury issues as we see alot, they would be the firsts to suffer health issues in their later days. But, are they? The former pros like McEnroe, Gilbert, etc.?
Go watch the documentary on Boris Becker. In the movie, he was on crutches in preparation for ankle surgery as a result of all the wear and tear he sustained over his career. Think he had hip, foot and ankle issues
 
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