How should I workout for recovery after tough points?

EddieBrock

Professional
I can play hitting cross court or "regular" 2 or 3 shot rallies for a while. What gets me are the long points where I'm sprinting up for a drop shot and then running back for a lob or hitting a shot on the full stretch and then racing to cover a few more shots. I'm perfectly fine finishing those points, but afterwards I get tired and need a minute to catch my breath, which I obviously don't get in the middle of a game. If I don't get a break I'm so tired I just try to end the points so I can sit down.

I've been doing push ups/pull ups as well as 30 minutes on the elliptical where I try to alternate going fast and slow.

Any other ideas about how to train to recover from those kinds of points?
 

BlueB

Legend
Learn from the best WTA and ATP pros:
First walk slowly from baseline to back fence, while adjusting the strings. You can talk to the racquet too, if needed.
Then, when on the baseline, pull the shorts out of your backside, smell your fingers, adjust your hair and shirt on the shoulders repetitively.
If the opponent is serving, lift your hand and say you are not ready.
Bounce the ball at least 20 times.
After particularly demanding points, brake your racquet and take your time unpacking a new one.
Last, but not least, always have a towel at the bench and use it between the points.
 

nyta2

Professional
Any other ideas about how to train to recover from those kinds of points?
while i'm not in shape now... but when i was in my best shape, i was training for 1M... doing 400m & 200m sprints
the idea (from various readings i did back in the day) was that the ratio of development between the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems needed for tennis, was similar to what's needed for a 1M race.

i've also done the star drill (
) and played out a "set" like that... rather than touch cones, and just swing an etchswing, but the idea is that every time you run that pattern, it's "1 point"... and try to complete a "set". i tried to get to like 10 games of 6 points each... (eg. run the star drill 60 times), but i think the most i got to was like 20
 

Power Player

Talk Tennis Guru
HIIT (2-3x a week spaced out) helps a lot. The secret is to be able to control your heart rate from spiking too much. Only way to do that is to exercise under high intensity and learn to breathe better.

It also really helps to use a trainer (YouTube has free HIIT workouts, there is peloton..etc) If you try and just do it yourself on a treadmill you won't really have the right gauge of how much effort to exert, for how long and when to stop/resume.
 

jga111

Hall of Fame
Vodka.

Or interval training (sprints 200m repetitions).

I find Vodka more effective personally
 

EddieBrock

Professional
while i'm not in shape now... but when i was in my best shape, i was training for 1M... doing 400m & 200m sprints
the idea (from various readings i did back in the day) was that the ratio of development between the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems needed for tennis, was similar to what's needed for a 1M race.

i've also done the star drill (
) and played out a "set" like that... rather than touch cones, and just swing an etchswing, but the idea is that every time you run that pattern, it's "1 point"... and try to complete a "set". i tried to get to like 10 games of 6 points each... (eg. run the star drill 60 times), but i think the most i got to was like 20
That looks like what I need. Especially with changing direction after sprinting

HIIT (2-3x a week spaced out) helps a lot. The secret is to be able to control your heart rate from spiking too much. Only way to do that is to exercise under high intensity and learn to breathe better.

It also really helps to use a trainer (YouTube has free HIIT workouts, there is peloton..etc) If you try and just do it yourself on a treadmill you won't really have the right gauge of how much effort to exert, for how long and when to stop/resume.
This morning I did a HIIT workout and it gave me the same feeling I get after one of those points. Out of breath and also feeling a bit dizzy. So I guess that's good training for tennis. What I did was like 20 seconds slow, 10 medium and then 20 fast and then repeated that pattern with different exercises.

I could go all day with the slow or medium, but when I go all out it really tires me out. I think that's what's happening with tennis. I go all out sprinting a few times and then I'm toast for a while.
 

socallefty

Legend
You are holding your breath during points if one long point makes you so breathless. Focus more on exhaling during points when you play. Make sure you exhale hard and take a long breath before you start your serve also. This is a common problem for many rec players.
 

Bambooman

Semi-Pro
While alternating hard and easy efforts is important more pure aerobic exercise needs to be added to that as well. Start running more.
 

nyta2

Professional
While alternating hard and easy efforts is important more pure aerobic exercise needs to be added to that as well. Start running more.
for me, the following helped clarify the relationship of hard/easy efforts, and why you need both...
sprints train both the aerobic and anaerobic energy systems.
so if both systems are trained, i can just do sprints, right? no.
you want to do the "easy" (aka. "aerobic") runs, of up to say 7M a day, to get your ligaments and tendons ready to do the hard strenuous work of sprints/interval training... because if you don't, you're more prone to injury.
 

EddieBrock

Professional
You are holding your breath during points if one long point makes you so breathless. Focus more on exhaling during points when you play. Make sure you exhale hard and take a long breath before you start your serve also. This is a common problem for many rec players.
That might be it. He says he coached someone who was in good shape but would be exhausted since she didn't breathe during the point.

 

Slicehand

Semi-Pro
Running, alternate some days mid-low speed long runs (about 45 min) and other days interval runs, for example running 10 minutes to warm up, then start intervals of 45s close to full gas, and then minute and a half of recovery ( running slow) you can do that for another 20 minutes, like that you train all your heart range, that helped me a lot, and also control your breath the moment before serving, exhale all the used air and controling your heartbeats so they are not so high at the moment of serving, i also love ciclying for cardio, but it makes my legs numb for tennis, maybe best in off season, and as others have pointed out, control your breath also during points, that not only helps your heartrate but also makes you play more relaxed and with no so much tension, that helps me to think during points and not only "muscle" them
 

onehandbh

Legend
I’ve found that the gym can also help with endurance. Stronger legs can make you feel lighter.

I do full body workouts every 3-4 days.
On one of the days the leg part of my workout includes 4 sets of squats and a set of deadlifts. On the other workout day, the leg portion includes lunges while holding dumbbells.

I rest about 1- 2 minutes between each set.

Also do yoga sometimes and hiking.
Tennis is the only activity I do that involves running and my endurance seems to be ok. Always try to run down every ball in a point.
 

cha cha

Professional
Learn from the best WTA and ATP pros:
First walk slowly from baseline to back fence, while adjusting the strings. You can talk to the racquet too, if needed.
Then, when on the baseline, pull the shorts out of your backside, smell your fingers, adjust your hair and shirt on the shoulders repetitively.
If the opponent is serving, lift your hand and say you are not ready.
Bounce the ball at least 20 times.
After particularly demanding points, brake your racquet and take your time unpacking a new one.
Last, but not least, always have a towel at the bench and use it between the points.
Also retake your ball toss at least twice.
 

EddieBrock

Professional
I’ve found that the gym can also help with endurance. Stronger legs can make you feel lighter.

I do full body workouts every 3-4 days.
On one of the days the leg part of my workout includes 4 sets of squats and a set of deadlifts. On the other workout day, the leg portion includes lunges while holding dumbbells.

I rest about 1- 2 minutes between each set.

Also do yoga sometimes and hiking.
Tennis is the only activity I do that involves running and my endurance seems to be ok. Always try to run down every ball in a point.
I don't really do any strength training for my legs since I'm playing tennis 3+ times a week. Guess I could incorporate that as well. There is a workout with legs and back (dumbells and pullups) that I might try again
 

Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.
Try doing sprint training! 20 yard dashes, follow by 40 yard dashes! Enjoy! Work your way up to doing 5 at a time, no rest! 5-20 yard, 5 40 yards. Do it in a time period of 2-3 months to get into this cardio shape. Every other day! Takes only 5 minutes! Start out slowly so you do not have a heart attack! If you are poor cardio health check, with a doctor first before trying this! Meant for advance athletes! Maybe seek a personal trainer to train you at the beginning? I am not a doctor, MD. Please consult with a MD before doing this! For sure get professional training help too! Do not do on your own!
 
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ZZdark

New User
Play full court basketball. Best complement to tennis imo. Tennis you learn how to run side - side. Full court will make you run up and down.
 
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