How to avoid overlapping crosses when string crosses (Head Speed MP)?

bobtodd

Rookie
When I'm stringing a client's Head Speed Graphene Touch MP, 4 out of 5 racquets have crosses that overlap on the 1st and 2nd string on the bumper. This increases the chance of scraping and breaking the string which has happened twice. Interestingly, one of the racquets have the crosses that lay side-by-side. Is there anything I can do to make the 4 racquets not have crosses that overlap and stick out past the bumper?
 

LeftyJunk

Rookie
Before I start the last main on each side I run in the first three crosses. That way you can still manipulate where in the grommet the two strings will be.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
String the racket 1 piece with an ATW pattern tying off the short side at 6H on the short side. Then you only have one point where you could possibly have a crossover and that’s at 7&8H on the long side which is easily avoided.

EDIT: This is just me because I’m a little OCD about crossovers, when you tie off your short side the main string from 7H with tie off at 6H either below or above the 6th main in 6H. I make sure the tag end goes over the main in 6H because the knot I tie will be on top. After you complete the ATW and you’re about to weave the top cross make sure the string going in 7H goes under the string already in 7H. After weaving the second cross make sure the cross string goes over the 8th main. This will keep the string outside the frame perfectly straight even though it is impossible to have a crossover.

Before you tie off the short side I would preserve everything up to the 3rd cross after tensioning the 6th mains on each side. That way the clamps are out of the way and there is no issue keeping everything layered right.
 
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esgee48

Legend
Shared grommets! I stuff in scrap pieces of string in those spots before I tension the mains; both hoop and throat. I position the scraps so that they are always on the same side (upper or lower) and they keep the mains on the same side and provide space for the crosses.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
Shared grommets!
Ahh yes, the gift that keeps giving!

Like @esgee48, I use loops of scrap string while installing the mains to block the holes I don’t want the string to go through.

Also, with respect to the shared holes, I exclusively use the lower holes for the mains, and the higher ones for the crosses.

Beyond all that, I as I’m pulling tension on strings that involve those shared holes, I use my off hand to guide the string to the correct hole (high or low). And then when the machine beeps, I eyeball that area quick to make sure there’s no cross over.

May all sound time consuming (it isn’t IMO)...and the end result (no cross overs) makes it all worth it.
 

1HBHfanatic

Legend
OP, you have to keep and eye out for these situations,
while stringing the mains, think about this issue,
either push the loop "down or up", but be conscious of it,, and repeat the process on the other racquets
this level of detail is what separates a good stringer from a beginner
all part of the learning process (if you care enough to become a better stringer),,
this overlap, will not affect the play (several threads on this topic), but as you've noted it will raise the string and cause premature breaking when scraped
 

GaryV

New User
GUILTY! I had this racquet for a bit and was cognizant of it. I recently strung one up and overlapped it :notworthy:
 

1HBHfanatic

Legend
GUILTY! I had this racquet for a bit and was cognizant of it. I recently strung one up and overlapped it :notworthy:
know the pain too well!
a time or 2 ive had to restring (sometimes for free), because I did not anticipate this issue
its a PITA, never ending scenario (not just in shared holes),
but it does look clean after, so its worth the little extra thought!!
 

bobtodd

Rookie
OP, you have to keep and eye out for these situations,
while stringing the mains, think about this issue,
either push the loop "down or up", but be conscious of it,, and repeat the process on the other racquets
this level of detail is what separates a good stringer from a beginner
all part of the learning process (if you care enough to become a better stringer),,
this overlap, will not affect the play (several threads on this topic), but as you've noted it will raise the string and cause premature breaking when scraped
I did know about it and tried everything to not overlap. I recently strung another of this racuets with success using the placing peices of string in the cross grommets.
 
It hasn't been a problem so far but I always make sure to keep an awl in the shared holes after tension has mostly pulled to help the strings situate itself correctly. Another thing to check is the bumper guard. Many times people have had issues with this, I noticed that they're grinding away the bumper guard in the same location as well as the string until it snaps in the hoop.
 

bxr

New User
Has anyone had experience stringing 2-piece on Head 360 Speed MP? I've never had such a pain and challenge stringing the first cross string, first two holes are blocked by the two main strings because the 8 holes at throat on this racquet, mains are finished on the top of the frame. This creates a couple challenges, 1. the starting cross knot would very close (almost touching) to the tie-offs of mains, so the main finishing knots need to be small enough and not poking the first cross string. 2. The tricky bit is getting the first cross through. It enters through first blocked mains (2 of them) from starting knot, then exits through the other side, again with blocked mains (2 of them), by the time I finish the first cross, I am exhausted.

Any good tips to share? I think I might have to start the first cross even before the main tie-offs to avoid all the blocked holes...
Thanks.
 
Has anyone had experience stringing 2-piece on Head 360 Speed MP? I've never had such a pain and challenge stringing the first cross string, first two holes are blocked by the two main strings because the 8 holes at throat on this racquet, mains are finished on the top of the frame. This creates a couple challenges, 1. the starting cross knot would very close (almost touching) to the tie-offs of mains, so the main finishing knots need to be small enough and not poking the first cross string. 2. The tricky bit is getting the first cross through. It enters through first blocked mains (2 of them) from starting knot, then exits through the other side, again with blocked mains (2 of them), by the time I finish the first cross, I am exhausted.

Any good tips to share? I think I might have to start the first cross even before the main tie-offs to avoid all the blocked holes...
Thanks.
I have used an awl to help make a gap as well and have also used the Gamma Pathfinder Guiding Awl, which helps you get into a tight area and then slide the awl back to allow a string to enter. This makes it simply to pull the string throuhg.

Another thing that helps is when you are initially stringing up the mains, either put a scrap string or an awl in the grommet hole when pulling tension to help maintain that spacing you need for when you start the crosses. Another good idea is to use a starting clamp for starting the crosses so you don't have to make such a big starting knot and can use a parnell knot, which is smaller and easier to use.
 
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fjcamry

Semi-Pro


Will this present a problem ? I forgot to block the shared hole when tying off mains . Now the one shared hole with the crosses is showing this


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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru


Will this present a problem ? I forgot to block the shared hole when tying off mains . Now the one shared hole with the crosses is showing this


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You racket isn’t finished just flip it around.
 

1HBHfanatic

Legend
You racket isn’t finished just flip it around.
agree here
check the other side and see if it is also crooked,
if other side is flat, use that side as your turn side, and the picture side as your tie of side
if both sides are crooked, you'll need to move one of the strings up or down carefully using your awl, to make sure its straight/flat (not easy todo!!, but can be done),,
ideally, youll wanna anticipate this issue and take steps to lay it flat next time..
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
No need for an awl. Take the red string that's crossing over the white string and I'll it out. Try to get that red string under the white one. If it doe not go easily and stays on top of the white one wrap the red string around the outside of the white main and under it and pull hard and it will go under the white one.

EDIT: Not sure but it looks like you want the red string going under the outer main anyway so you weave it right. You may have to help the red string lay below the white one on the outside. If you would have pre.weaved the Red Cross before tensioning the outer mains with shared holes you wouldn't have the issue,
 
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fjcamry

Semi-Pro
Just saw this guys . The racquet is done. I would have flipped the racquet over if I knew because the other side is flat . I would have also put some scrap string in the shared holes also to prevent the cross over . Also the shared holes have a side for each string with a little divider built in the grommet preventing the idea of moving the string with an awl impossible or tightening the red string under the multifilament.


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the crossed side

the flat side at starter knot

. Grommet has dedicated holes for each shared string making impossible to move string
 
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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Just saw this guys . The racquet is done. I would have flipped the racquet over if I knew because the other side is flat . I would have also put some scrap string in the shared holes also to prevent the cross over . Also the shared holes have a side for each string with a little divider built in the grommet preventing the idea of moving the string with an awl impossible or tightening the red string under the multifilament.


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Flipping the racket over puts the cross over on the other side, and I’m not exactly sur how you flip the racket over when the frame is mounted and has the mains strung. Why use a scrap string, just wasted time. Preweave the top crosses before tensioning the outer mains with the shared holes, and because of the dividers you will see the crossover in time to fix it.

Because of the divider the only option is to start over once the mains are tied off, unless you don’t care about the crossover.
 

fjcamry

Semi-Pro
Flipping the racket over puts the cross over on the other side, and I’m not exactly sur how you flip the racket over when the frame is mounted and has the mains strung. Why use a scrap string, just wasted time. Preweave the top crosses before tensioning the outer mains with the shared holes, and because of the dividers you will see the crossover in time to fix it.

Because of the divider the only option is to start over once the mains are tied off, unless you don’t care about the crossover.
Yes I don’t care about the cross over for this job . I have total 6 racquets , and I’ll pre-weave before tensioning outer mains next time .


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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
As far as how the racket plays it will not matter. It looks like you don’t scrape the court with your racket. If you did the crossover would raise a string and the court would eat it up in no time.

EDIT: It won’t matter but keep the crosses on the top side of divider on one side and on the bottom on the other.
 
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fjcamry

Semi-Pro
As far as how the racket plays it will not matter. It looks like you don’t scrape the court with your racket. If you did the crossover would raise a string and the court would eat it up in no time.

EDIT: It won’t matter but keep the crosses on the top side of divider on one side and on the bottom on the other.
like this



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