How To Choose A Great Coach (Part 1)

How To Choose A Great Coach (Part1)


Being a good coach consists of few factors: extensive knowledge of technique, precise root error detection and effective methods of fixing it, constant feedback, ability to transfer knowledge to a student, ability to structure practice with the most benefit to the student, motivation and support, being able to create a fun atmosphere without losing the effectiveness of training, knowledge of off-court training, knowledge of tennis psychology, knowledge of tactics and strategies, knowledge of recovery process, and having good people skills, etc. I guarantee you there are very few people who possess all of these, but that’s what you should be looking for in a coach. The more of these factors the coach possesses the higher his/her value goes, consequently, the more benefit he/she will bring to the student. Let’s start by looking at these factors one by one.


1. Extensive Knowledge of Technique


This is by far one of the most important aspects of good coaching. After all, the coach is there to teach students how to hit the ball correctly, right? It follows that they will have to know how and why it has to be performed in a certain way. There are certain principles that have to be followed in order to produce an effective and efficient swing and there is virtually no room for creativity or interpretation there in terms of the mechanics of it. A good coach will be able to give you the big picture and then break every motion down and explain its function. “The devil is in the details,” people usually say, and every stroke in tennis is full of them. Starting with an accurate grip and ending with the end of the swing, it’s coach’s job to oversee and enforce correct stroke production and consistently correcting the wrong or inefficient ones.

Every student is different, and they will always bring a part of their own flair into their swings. It’s coach’s job to let their personality shine through their swings but at the same time make sure they maintain proper fundamentals in doing so. If there is ever any friction between proper form and student’s own interpretation of a certain swing, proper form should always come out on top. The coach should make the call whether their flair is compatible or complementary with the correct stroke production or not. If it’s not, it means that it is damaging to the student’s game and they should never allow it.

Unfortunately, there are many coaches out there who know only bits and pieces (if that) of a good swing and that forces their students to fill in the blanks themselves, overwhelmingly with the wrong mechanics that are extremely time-consuming to undo in the future. It’s a lot easier to learn the proper technique the first time around than learn and unlearn a bunch of times, that’s where the value of a good coach comes in. They will make sure that their students learn the proper form right away, which gets them better faster, spares them a lot of frustration from learning and unlearning, saves them their body and their wallet in a long run, and increases their overall enjoyment of the game.

I always say that any swing in tennis is a like a manual watch, it contains many gears that have to work just right in relation to each other. On court, it is up to the coach to break every factor of the swing down to their students, make them grasp the reasons why those factors are there and what benefits the students will attain in performing them accurately.
 

rogerroger917

Hall of Fame
I read the posts in here and a lot of people think you can YouTube coach yourself. I think to actually learn to play tennis you need real life coach. Not saying all coaches are good. But a good coach is needed to actually play tennis properly. I see all these adults with terrible skills and they wonder why they never get better.

They don't practice and they don't even know what to practice. And no. YouTube won't tell you.
 
I read the posts in here and a lot of people think you can YouTube coach yourself. I think to actually learn to play tennis you need real life coach. Not saying all coaches are good. But a good coach is needed to actually play tennis properly. I see all these adults with terrible skills and they wonder why they never get better.

They don't practice and they don't even know what to practice. And no. YouTube won't tell you.
You can learn a lot from watching freeze frame videos (my dad did that), but it will take you quite a long time. then besides knowing, you have to know where exactly the problem is. so, yes, you would def need a real life coach to do that
 

rogerroger917

Hall of Fame
LOL. not quite. I don't think anyone can tell you how to find one. There are additional facets of a great coach that are coming up in the following parts.
I think unless you are on this forum for giggles it's a waste of time for tennis coaches. Nobody wants to actually learn tennis here. With a few exceptions of guys who already know how to play. The rest think they can play like Federer watching videos.

But this place is great for fun and trolling.
 
I think unless you are on this forum for giggles it's a waste of time for tennis coaches. Nobody wants to actually learn tennis here. With a few exceptions of guys who already know how to play. The rest think they can play like Federer watching videos.

But this place is great for fun and trolling.
hahah, maybe it's true. I think there are very few coaches out there who actually know the ins and outs of the technique, let alone effectively teaching it. My goal is for people to know who they are hiring
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
Fantastic. Another new guy here to bestow his wisdom on us in the form of nonsensical hot air that he cooked up in his head with no real world experience.

Thomas Daniels part ii.

J
 
Fantastic. Another new guy here to bestow his wisdom on us in the form of nonsensical hot air that he cooked up in his head with no real world experience.

Thomas Daniels part ii.

J
LOL. Nonsensical?! No real world experience? I am a new guy, you must be an old grumpy guy. Nice to meet you!
 
Or maybe just paranoia from bad previous experiences. I'm willing to avoid judgement, but OP might want to take down the tags that seem to promote something. Just my 2¢.
You are right, I'm promoting something. I'm promoting a more educated kids and parents who pick coaches who know how to actually coach. Have you seen what is being taught out there? I'm getting very tired of watching awful form being taught and people spending tons of $ on it. I'm the guy who has to clean all of that up later, and it's very frustrating.
 
Wait, isn't that what coaching is all about? Back to the drawing board....
Have you seen what is being taught out there? You are right that is what coaching is all about. The question is coaching what
Wait, isn't that what coaching is all about? Back to the drawing board....
You are right. It is what the coaching all about. The question is: Coaching what?
 
Are you able to teach the Macci ATP forehand to a 3.5 Adult?
I don't teach Macci ATP forehand, I teach Federer, Nadal, and Djokovic ATP forehand. And I can teach it to anyone from 8 year old to 80. They teach bears to ride bikes in circus, teaching FH is a lot easier than that.
 
Why do you believe the ATP forehand is superior and do you also teach it to girls as well?
Easy. Because best players in the world have it and use it to create a lethal combination of power and spin. I do teach it to girls too cause I believe that it's a superior way with more benefits all around. I also see it moving into women's tennis (Justine-Henin, etc)
 






Probably posting from the court between sets.
Your best chance of finding a good coach is to find the coach who teaches the top juniors in your area. It's no guarantee that such a coach will be that good, but, it's your best chance, in my view.
Your best chance of finding a good coach is to find the coach who teaches the top juniors in your area. It's no guarantee that such a coach will be that good, but, it's your best chance, in my view.
It's true a lot of times. I would say it this way, good coach is the one who develops a complete competitive player from scratch.
 
Never windshield wiper, that terminology is terrible in my view. Sock? McEnroe?????? Sock's forehand is better than Federer, Nadal, and Djokovic? News to me
 

J011yroger

Talk Tennis Guru
Ah, the good old Fed-Nadal-Djokovic bent-straight-extreme-mild-wraparound-windshield-wiper-buggy-whip-looping-driving-attacking-aggressive-passive-defensive forehand.

I favor the Sock-McEnroe.
Hi, I am an aspiring mixed doubles player. Do you think I would be better off modeling Sock or Jamie Murray for my forehand?

J
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
You must have had your racket strung at 80.34789 lbs mains and 89.000456 lbs crosses. Otherwise the ball will never go in that many times. Using a stringer calibrated to the orbit of an electron.
Totally right and that is why i struggle! Machine tops out at 86lbs.
 
Top