How To Handle Opponent Accusing Me of Hooking?

Never really had a situation like this before. Last night, I'm playing a match and I can tell my opponent is getting annoyed with my line calls. Not totally sure why, since I always called it in if I wasn't 100% sure, but he was getting annoyed. There was one point, during a crucial point in the second set, he hits a high ball that plops down just out, but clearly out, and he questioned me, but I stuck with the call because I was 100% sure it was out.

After the match, which he won, he confronts me and is very condescending and telling me that I am supposed to be giving him the benefit of the doubt and only calling balls out if I'm 100% sure. He was particularly upset that I, on a couple occasions, was far from where the ball landed and it was very hard from my vantage point to see where the ball landed. So, I asked him since he got a better view if he thought it was in or out since I didn't really see, knowing that I was calling it in unless he told me it was out (I've asked a bunch of opponents in the past in this type of scenario, and it's never been a problem). In the past, there have been similar situations for me where I've called my own balls out that were way out, but my opponent couldn't see where it landed due to his vantage point. So I only ask because this situation occurred and if my opponent said it was in, that he couldn't tell, or he thought it was out but wasn't sure, I was going to of course call it in.

The other thing he was upset about is one time he hit a close serve that I called in, but he missed the next ball because, from my perspective, it looked like he stopped play because he thought the serve was out. I asked him after the point, because it looked like he stopped play, if he thought that serve was out (even though I called it in). He clearly didn't like that. He essentially told me after the match that I was calling borderline serves out, which is patently false since I gave him the benefit of the doubt for every call that I couldn't clearly see.

And so, after that crucial second set point, which I guess was the tipping point for him, he just really came after me after the match. Someone in the past has come after me for not liking how I played (with moon balls and "dinks") but not one has ever been this ferocious coming after me about line calls and really questioning my integrity. So, we got in an argument after the match, I tried to explain because it did sound like he had the wrong idea of my intentions in various situations, but I eventually just told him have a good night and walked off.

I know the rules and I would never cheat someone. I've never been accused of hooking before and I thought it was really wrong of him to come at me so hard. Of course there were calls he made that I thought were questionable, I just didn't say anything because I was giving him the benefit of the doubt. How do y'all handle situations like this? It's really turned me off from wanting to play anymore.
 

Heck

Rookie
If most matches are like this then maybe it's you lol. But if this is rare then move on and enjoy the sport. It's totally his fault for stopping play after thinking his serve is out.
He sees the back of the ball from far and you see the front close. He has to play the point and not try and make calls on your side of the court.
 
U are RIGHT and he is WRONG! He's a mental case--I played one like him early on in a league match and it turns out he was a PSYCHIATRIST!!! Afterwards, even his teammates said he was NOTORIOUS for his antics and head-games--that's CHEATING by The Code book of tennis. Over the years others have reiterated that he's a cheater and a nut job.

I was green back then to the culture of league tennis and got intimidated. After a match like that u feel dirty--it's NOT tennis! One method to combat this species of low-life of tennis is to shamelessly cheat them back--they will then respect u and stop cheating, with the understanding that u can play that game too and may be better at it--it's worked every time. U don't go to hell for cheating a cheater back in a tennis match--it's NOT tennis anymore--it's mind games--u have to fight fire with fire--it's like setting backfires to stop forest fires.
 
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If most matches are like this then maybe it's you lol. But if this is rare then move on and enjoy the sport. It's totally his fault for stopping play after thinking his serve is out.
He sees the back of the ball from far and you see the front close. He has to play the point and not try and make calls on your side of the court.
Most matches are far, far from this. We usually get along great and for the occasional time someone thinks a ball is in that I called out, they say so politely, I realize I made a mistake, and we move on and are good with one another. In this case, I am confident that I didn't do anything wrong and yeah, that was weird how he was upset that I called a close call in for him. I only asked him afterwards because he looked stunned I didn't make an out call during the point.
 

FuzzyYellowBalls

Hall of Fame
He was probably upset about something that happened that day, that week, or is coming up and it changed his mood. He won the match too, that bit of information was good to include, I bet it was something else increasing his anxiety or whatever and he took it out on you.
 
He was probably upset about something that happened that day, that week, or is coming up and it changed his mood. He won the match too, that bit of information was good to include, I bet it was something else increasing his anxiety or whatever and he took it out on you.
Yeah he won. Was a really good player, didn't feel I did that much wrong. Could have been something off-court related, it could have also been the fact that I was throwing up a bunch of moon balls when he was back and lobs when he would come to the net, so maybe that annoyed him and he used what he perceived as bad line calling to go off on me.
 

FuzzyYellowBalls

Hall of Fame
Yeah he won. Was a really good player, didn't feel I did that much wrong. Could have been something off-court related, it could have also been the fact that I was throwing up a bunch of moon balls when he was back and lobs when he would come to the net, so maybe that annoyed him and he used what he perceived as bad line calling to go off on me.
That does annoy many people, I've been cussed out in Spanish a few times myself for lob-returning in doubles, nothing you can do about it. The fact that you even care he was upset, I doubt anything you did was wrong.
 
That does annoy many people, I've been cussed out in Spanish a few times myself for lob-returning in doubles, nothing you can do about it. The fact that you even care he was upset, I doubt anything you did was wrong.
Well, it's not the first time someone's been upset after playing me. Just the fact that he was so rude and questioned my integrity bothered me.
 
Never really had a situation like this before. Last night, I'm playing a match and I can tell my opponent is getting annoyed with my line calls. Not totally sure why, since I always called it in if I wasn't 100% sure, but he was getting annoyed. There was one point, during a crucial point in the second set, he hits a high ball that plops down just out, but clearly out, and he questioned me, but I stuck with the call because I was 100% sure it was out.

After the match, which he won, he confronts me and is very condescending and telling me that I am supposed to be giving him the benefit of the doubt and only calling balls out if I'm 100% sure. He was particularly upset that I, on a couple occasions, was far from where the ball landed and it was very hard from my vantage point to see where the ball landed. So, I asked him since he got a better view if he thought it was in or out since I didn't really see, knowing that I was calling it in unless he told me it was out (I've asked a bunch of opponents in the past in this type of scenario, and it's never been a problem). In the past, there have been similar situations for me where I've called my own balls out that were way out, but my opponent couldn't see where it landed due to his vantage point. So I only ask because this situation occurred and if my opponent said it was in, that he couldn't tell, or he thought it was out but wasn't sure, I was going to of course call it in.

The other thing he was upset about is one time he hit a close serve that I called in, but he missed the next ball because, from my perspective, it looked like he stopped play because he thought the serve was out. I asked him after the point, because it looked like he stopped play, if he thought that serve was out (even though I called it in). He clearly didn't like that. He essentially told me after the match that I was calling borderline serves out, which is patently false since I gave him the benefit of the doubt for every call that I couldn't clearly see.

And so, after that crucial second set point, which I guess was the tipping point for him, he just really came after me after the match. Someone in the past has come after me for not liking how I played (with moon balls and "dinks") but not one has ever been this ferocious coming after me about line calls and really questioning my integrity. So, we got in an argument after the match, I tried to explain because it did sound like he had the wrong idea of my intentions in various situations, but I eventually just told him have a good night and walked off.

I know the rules and I would never cheat someone. I've never been accused of hooking before and I thought it was really wrong of him to come at me so hard. Of course there were calls he made that I thought were questionable, I just didn't say anything because I was giving him the benefit of the doubt. How do y'all handle situations like this? It's really turned me off from wanting to play anymore.
BTW, what level was the match at?
 
Well, technically 3.5 although I'm a 4.0 (they won't put you at 4.0 in this league without matches in their league under your belt) and he says he doesn't have a ranking, so I guess they put him here too, even though he was clearly at a high 4.0 level.
Thanks for the clarification--I lovingly refer to the 4.0's as the Macho Man level--not all but some-- present company excluded of course.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
So giving someone the benefit of the doubt on a first serve and asking for their opinion on a line call is hooking now?

The guy is obviously out to lunch.

My pat answer to anyone that argues rules is to ask if they have read the Tennis Code more than once. If not I just say, let's carry on this discussion after you have. Arguing serves little purpose if one side comes from a place of ignorance.
 

ChaelAZ

G.O.A.T.
Meh, there are always a few players like that, where somehow they never believe they hit anything out and are consistently painting lines. I mean, there may be instances where I miss a call a bit, more that I call balls in and play them that are actually out. But when I get questioned I just say, "I saw it out" and they can deal with it. If you aren't being an overly critical line call **** then you should have a clear conscience.
 
So giving someone the benefit of the doubt on a first serve and asking for their opinion on a line call is hooking now?

The guy is obviously out to lunch.

My pat answer to anyone that argues rules is to ask if they have read the Tennis Code more than once. If not I just say, let's carry on this discussion after you have. Arguing serves little purpose if one side comes from a place of ignorance.
Yes, that's what was so strange to me and why I was struggling to figure out what he was talking about, in all honesty. Because I did call that serve in and I felt I was actually extraordinarily fair with the line calls. He mentioned serves specifically, and I really don't even know what he's talking about. Every questionable serve was called in. In hindsight, I think he didn't like my style and it was bothering him how often I was lobbing him, so he was picking a fight.
 
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Meh, there are always a few players like that, where somehow they never believe they hit anything out and are consistently painting lines. I mean, there may be instances where I miss a call a bit, more that I call balls in and play them that are actually out. But when I get questioned I just say, "I saw it out" and they can deal with it. If you aren't being an overly critical line call **** then you should have a clear conscience.
Yeah, on that point where he was serving for the match at deuce, when he questioned the high ball that I clearly saw land out, I just said something along the lines of "I'm 100% sure it was out" and moved on. Quite frankly, it was incredible to me that he felt, from the other side of the court, he could question a slow high ball where I had a great look at it and was close by.
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Thanks for the clarification--I lovingly refer to the 4.0's as the Macho Man level--not all but some-- present company excluded of course.
IMO, it's the level where there is maximum delusion about one's abilities. I don't see 3.5- making this mistake nor 4.5+, for the most part. It wasn't until I got bumped to 4.5 did I appreciate just how many there are better than I [about 100,000, according to myutr.com].
 

FuzzyYellowBalls

Hall of Fame
You sure they weren't just complimenting your excellent lob skills? :D
Ahaha, in fact I didn't even know until a team-mate who is bi-lingual told me what they were saying. Man, the only people that compliment my lob skills, and I do actually have pretty good lob skills, even half volley lobs, are 4.5 and up, they seem to be able to recognize that it is a legitimate shot.
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Ahaha, in fact I didn't even know until a team-mate who is bi-lingual told me what they were saying. Man, the only people that compliment my lob skills, and I do actually have pretty good lob skills, even half volley lobs, are 4.5 and up, they seem to be able to recognize that it is a legitimate shot.
Hey, if it's good enough for the Bryan brothers, it's good enough for me.
 

Rosstour

Legend
One of my friends does this.

So I just play everything. Even balls that are a foot out. That should send the message. Or maybe not.
 

stapletonj

Hall of Fame
"it could have also been the fact that I was throwing up a bunch of moon balls when he was back and lobs when he would come to the net, so maybe that annoyed him and he used what he perceived as bad line calling to go off on me."

ding ding ding we have a winner!
 
One of my friends does this.

So I just play everything. Even balls that are a foot out. That should send the message. Or maybe not.
Guess I just need to accept that not everyone I play will play in good faith. Was really hoping to find some people to play with outside of the league, unfortunately, definitely won't ever contact this guy again.
 

Booger

Hall of Fame
Guess I just need to accept that not everyone I play will play in good faith. Was really hoping to find some people to play with outside of the league, unfortunately, definitely won't ever contact this guy again.

Find another 3.5 moonballer who also calls lines super tight. You guys can junk ball each other until the cows come home.
 

a10best

Hall of Fame
And so, after that crucial second set point, which I guess was the tipping point for him, he just really came after me after the match. Someone in the past has come after me for not liking how I played (with moon balls and "dinks") but not one has ever been this ferocious coming after me about line calls and really questioning my integrity. So, we got in an argument after the match, I tried to explain because it did sound like he had the wrong idea of my intentions in various situations, but I eventually just told him have a good night and walked off.

I know the rules and I would never cheat someone. I've never been accused of hooking before and I thought it was really wrong of him to come at me so hard. Of course there were calls he made that I thought were questionable, I just didn't say anything because I was giving him the benefit of the doubt. How do y'all handle situations like this? It's really turned me off from wanting to play anymore.
Close line calls plus you're a moonballer and dinker? Yep, that's a recipe for triggering an alpha personality opponent. JK,or maybe not since I'm not a fan of dinkers.
I'm surprised his doubts weren't discussed during a changeover or end of the set. The guy won and still had to argue with you post match. That's a new one.

I had one guy not give me questionable calls and then used a ball interference to replay a point he knew he lost where I would have won the game. The ball did not interfere with his shot. If anything it would have affected me.
A few games later on his match point, he thinks he hit a mis-hit service return drop shot on my front court sideline. He was walking to the net to shake hands and saying sorry for that shot. I said "no, it was out". I went on to win the 2nd set, and the 3rd. FWIW, his ball was not clearly in and I saw it out. I usually give people the benefit of the doubt a lot. Sometimes you get characters playing mind games.
 
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USTA event?
“If you thought I made a bad call then you should have asked for a referee”
And walk away

If not a USTA event then who gives af honestly
 

Slicehand

Professional
Option 1: Tell him he must have a pretty crappy life to get so annoyed over a match that he even won

Option 2: tell him you are not one of those hookers, never was

Option 2: blow his dominant eye with a fork so he wont be sure anymore and have to trust you on line calls, it would help him with his backhand too
 

Johnny505

Semi-Pro
I would make use of the vid camera or voice recorder on your cellphone to record any incidences once you feel the situation is likely to escalate and to protect yourself. Factual evidence is best evidence to show what an axxxhole the other party is.
 

struggle

Legend
This sounds like women's tennis (<4.0) where the lines are considered "out". See it all the time.
 
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Brian11785

Hall of Fame
I packed up and left on a guy for the first time a couple weeks ago in a flex league match.

Usually one call doesn't set me off, but this was the slowest of floaters two inches inside the line that he was right on top of.

I didn't make a scene. I almost left without telling him more than, "I can't run anymore," (which was technically true since I lost all motivation.) I just said it was a "me" issue....that I play tennis for fun and I can't have fun after a call that bad. It's my problem. Didn't make any broad statements on his character. Didn't get angry. He made some excuse about "the glare" and how I should have questioned it at the time (I did. I suppose he wanted me to be more forceful? Explicitly call him a cheater, maybe.)

My only regret is that I didn't quit right then at 1-3 in the first set right after the call. I instead just silently netted every ball from that point until the first set was over and then left.

Life's too short.
 

FedLIKEnot

Professional
As many have said adult rec tennis and especially high 3.5 and 4.0s have a different impression of their own skills. So balls that you see are even way out they assume they hit with so much spin it must have hit in. Never mind that especially in a baseline to baseline rally the ball is 78 feet away. Its a joke.

I talked to a official at an USTA event about line calls once. And she was a 4.0, had been a official for a decade plus; she said almost every single player reads the ball on the bounce. Which makes sense you have to try to hit a ball. When in fact we all should be trying to read the ball where it lands. Which I know makes sense but I swear up to that point I hadnt thought about it. She further explained that based upon pace and type of shot the ball can compress on the court enough that when it bounces up you could see as inches out when in fact it was bang on the line. Those Hawkeye reviews show that too. You will see a ball make on there that is almost as wide as the line itself. So even more so, when you are not sure it was out, than it must have been in.
 

Bambooman

Professional
I packed up and left on a guy for the first time a couple weeks ago in a flex league match.

Usually one call doesn't set me off, but this was the slowest of floaters two inches inside the line that he was right on top of.

I didn't make a scene. I almost left without telling him more than, "I can't run anymore," (which was technically true since I lost all motivation.) I just said it was a "me" issue....that I play tennis for fun and I can't have fun after a call that bad. It's my problem. Didn't make any broad statements on his character. Didn't get angry. He made some excuse about "the glare" and how I should have questioned it at the time (I did. I suppose he wanted me to be more forceful? Explicitly call him a cheater, maybe.)

My only regret is that I didn't quit right then at 1-3 in the first set right after the call. I instead just silently netted every ball from that point until the first set was over and then left.

Life's too short.
This is just a variation of taking your ball and going home.
 

Pumpkin

Semi-Pro
Based on the information provided it would appear your opponent was suffering from paranoia. Possibly as a result of substance abuse. Atleast I wouldn't be surprised if that were found to be the case.
 

FiddlerDog

Professional
If it's close, I always call it in.
If it looks out, but I am not close, I ask him if he saw it out also. If not, I change the call to in.
If I call a close serve in, and he thinks its out and stopped playing the point, I offer him a 1st serve redo.

Bonus tip: Early in the match, if its close, but out, I still call it in.
 
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