how to improve those "barely reached" defense shots (squash shots, etc.)

mainmain

New User
Hi,

I wonder if anyone know drills for working on those shots, when you are pushed wide and are nearly out of reach.
I am your guy to run like a rabbit on pills and manage to get in reach of many balls, but my squash shots and alikes are far too dull and easy for my opponent to finish.

Of course you can always train rallying on normal incoming balls with conti grip and force yourself to be late or far from the ball, but that does not make sense. It is also hard to work on a shot in simulating a really straining scenario at each time : being on the run and far-stretched at each shot, I don't know how many repetitions can be done before being physically eroded.

Thus my question : how to improve technique without exhausting, and at the same time keep consistent with the situation in which those shots will occur.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
I would say have someone hit away from u and make u hit them so you practice them, or do these drills with a coach.
 

Dou

Semi-Pro
you need to practice.. but also need to know what to practice.

the squash shot almost feels like a very low slice serve... and the racket face needs to maintain the same angle when you 'cut in'... this gives you consistency and allows you to go somewhat aggressive and keep the ball low and penetrating.
 

blablavla

Hall of Fame
I recall a training I've seen for a talented junior.
it was about a failed switch from backhand CC exchange to DTL, and subsequent attack from opponent on forehand CC.

So the coach / sparing partner was situated in the forehand side of the court. Not necessarily in the corner, as they would feed one ball, and it has to be a tough ball.
The junior was situated in the backhand side. You can stay in the middle of the court, or few steps to the backhand side. Depends on the difficulty you want to practice and depends on your actual position in real match.

The coach / feeding partner would then launch the CC forehand, that kicks you out wide of the court.
And the junior had to attack forehand down the line.

This is essentially a one shot situation.
Nowadays, the pros know that it might still come back, but when properly executed in return you will receive a sitter, so they probably train as well the return to middle of the court.
But you can simply train one "final" shot, be it a down the line, or a squash type of slice, or whatever else you are using.
I would assume that you will be needing a partner for such a drill.
 
Hi,

I wonder if anyone know drills for working on those shots, when you are pushed wide and are nearly out of reach.
I am your guy to run like a rabbit on pills and manage to get in reach of many balls, but my squash shots and alikes are far too dull and easy for my opponent to finish.

Of course you can always train rallying on normal incoming balls with conti grip and force yourself to be late or far from the ball, but that does not make sense. It is also hard to work on a shot in simulating a really straining scenario at each time : being on the run and far-stretched at each shot, I don't know how many repetitions can be done before being physically eroded.

Thus my question : how to improve technique without exhausting, and at the same time keep consistent with the situation in which those shots will occur.
Better anticipation, early recognition of the ball's path, and a quicker first step.

Beyond that, I'm not sure what you can do on a ball that you barely reach: at that point, my only objective is to get it back over the net; I don't have the luxury of picking and choosing much of anything [depth, spin, location, etc].

And if it is barely within reach, how do you not become exhausted? Get into better shape. I can do two, maybe three, in a row before my quads start giving out. Trying to separate the physical part from the technique might not be a valid way of training since the two are so tightly linked.
 

mainmain

New User
Better anticipation, early recognition of the ball's path, and a quicker first step.

Beyond that, I'm not sure what you can do on a ball that you barely reach: at that point, my only objective is to get it back over the net; I don't have the luxury of picking and choosing much of anything [depth, spin, location, etc].

And if it is barely within reach, how do you not become exhausted? Get into better shape. I can do two, maybe three, in a row before my quads start giving out. Trying to separate the physical part from the technique might not be a valid way of training since the two are so tightly linked.
Yeah, my problem is that I bring them back most of them but they are too easy for my opponent to finish.
Let's say: I bring 80% back but get nailed on the next shot for 90% of them.
I'd prefer execute a more risky shot (let's say 60% in) which buys me better chances to win the point anyway.
 
Yeah, my problem is that I bring them back most of them but they are too easy for my opponent to finish.
Let's say: I bring 80% back but get nailed on the next shot for 90% of them.
I'd prefer execute a more risky shot (let's say 60% in) which buys me better chances to win the point anyway.
instead of a riskier shot, do you have the opportunity to hit it deeper? Unless he's coming to the net, depth solves a lot of problems and wouldn't necessarily involve more risk.

If by riskier you mean a highlight reel DTL flat shot that lands a foot inside each line, I'd opt out.

Again, I'm envisioning barely getting my racquet on the ball; I'm in no position to hit anything other than a very defensive shot. The one exception is if I try a drop shot; I might have the control for that. But ask any good player what the odds are when one is fully stretched and lunging for the ball; not good.
 

ubercat

Semi-Pro
Risky shot. Easy to net dump Easier to loop for time. I d like to say loop to a target but I think for most of us reality is we're just going to be able to clear the net and it goes where it will
 
Leg strength and flexibility helps a lot. If you can make a long and wide last step and then block the outward momentum with string leg muscles you have a much better chance to hit it back.
 
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