How to keep tension on last main strings

#1
What is the best way to make sure that the last main strings remain tight after tying off? I find that it is difficult to pull all of the slack out, so I have started pulling the last mains a little tighter and then tying off. This seems to work, but I wonder how the professional stringers do it. Any advice is greatly appreciated. I am relatively new to stringing and I string on a Gamma drop weight. Thanks.
 
#2
I do what you do. Increase tension 5-8#. I also use tie off holes that keeps the lengths between the tie off and the last mains at a minimum. Also use a Pro knot.
 
#3
I don't worry about it, just do my best without adding tension
And tighten by hand/starting clamp.

BUT, this would be the next "great" stringing too.......
A tool that is a combo cam action plier and crimping tool
Built into one.
 
#4
You can try looping. Tension second outside string last. (#7 on 16 main pattern and #8 on 18 main pattern) Increase tension on last pull to compensate for loss you will get on tie off. Outer mains will be much tighter when customer wiggles them.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
#5
Used to obsess over this as well... But now I just do the best I can to make a good knot and not worry about it so much.

For some strings increasing the tension stretch it so the last mains will be "more inconsistent" vs the rest of the mains.

Another method not mentioned here is to tie off all 4 knots after weaving the entire stringbed which will result in more friction and less drawback, twisting, etc. It does require additional clamps.
 

Ramon

Hall of Fame
#6
I gave up on trying to make the last string as tight as the rest. Even if you add 10+ pounds to the last string, you'll still lose tension.

However, if you are not stringing a hybrid, you can get all the mains to the same tension using a one-piece pattern. You'll have to reserve an extra foot or two on the short side. Instead of tying off the short side on the last main, you can do the first cross with it. Depending on your racquet, you may or may not have to do an around the world. You'll still have 2 crosses that are loose, but all the mains will be tight.
 
#7
What is the best way to make sure that the last main strings remain tight after tying off? I find that it is difficult to pull all of the slack out, so I have started pulling the last mains a little tighter and then tying off. This seems to work, but I wonder how the professional stringers do it. Any advice is greatly appreciated. I am relatively new to stringing and I string on a Gamma drop weight. Thanks.
Never tie off an outside main. How are you stringing now 1 piece/2 piece, hybrid/full bed, and what is your pattern?
 

Ramon

Hall of Fame
#8
You can try looping. Tension second outside string last. (#7 on 16 main pattern and #8 on 18 main pattern) Increase tension on last pull to compensate for loss you will get on tie off. Outer mains will be much tighter when customer wiggles them.

I used to do that, but I no longer do it because I mostly string my own racquets. If I have to choose between a loose #7 or a loose #8 main, I'll take the #8.
 
#10
You will have some drawback no getting around it and I don't think you can make up for it by increasing tension. If you use flying clamps it will even be worse. Best thing you can do is tie a good knot.
 

lwto

Hall of Fame
#11
You will have some drawback no getting around it and I don't think you can make up for it by increasing tension. If you use flying clamps it will even be worse. Best thing you can do is tie a good knot.
When I started to learn stringing, a couple of friends of mine used the "jam the awl into the tie-off knot hole" method. I was never at ease with this method and just used your method to cinch as best one can. I do however, on occsion, will pull the last two tensioned strings(wiggle more like it) and t seems to average out any slack that may have resulted from, lack of cinch.

Anyway, Mr Irvin, I take it you are not a proponent of the awl method either are you?

It just seems you over time you stretch out the grommet holes, possibly damage the frame it self and even possible damage the strings.
 
#12
Definitely not a big fan of using awls. I just finished up string 10 Tecnifibre rackets and the grommet hole are ver small except for the tie offs. You have to be careful pulling the strings out so you don't take the grommet out too and new strings that are mushroomed on the tips won't even go in. When you have grommets like that I would not want to jam an awl in there.

As far as wiggling the strings it will average out the tensions but I'm not sure I'd want to do that either. I would rather have all the loss on the outside mains. One good thing is I believe the OP said he strung with a hybrid setup. Poly mains should make for less drawback.

Someone mentioned using a Yonex loop earlier. If you're using flying clamps that's an excellent idea if you have a starting clamp or a triple. Placing two flying clamps on the final string clamped to the mains on each side should greatly reduce drawback due to the flying clamp twisting.
 
#13
I use the cinching method to tighten a pro knot which does pretty well. Better on nylon, gut and multi and not quite as good on poly.

I sometimes will use +4 lbs on the last main and cross.

I read Sampras used +4 on the last 2 mains and crosses. And, others use slightly higher tension.
 
#14
I will let you in on a little secret that most pro stringing rooms do on the outside mains. Increase tension 11#s and pull the string once, release, and pull it again. That being said, many years ago the Wizard of Boz (Warren Bosworth) told me to increase the tension or not. He said it made not a lick of difference in the string bed stiffness. Remember that when you (or your customers) start wiggling this outside main that you are being silly and stupid. Of course it moves more - there is not another main on the outside of it.
 
#15
LOL if you have a CP stringer what different does it make if you pull tension let it relax and pull again or just pull twice as long. That's just plain silly IMHO.

EDIT: Probably the reasoning for an 11 lb bump is that's the limit on Babolat for the knot function. You could also use a prestretch for knot in addition to the knot function. I'm sure all those methods increase the stretch on the outside mains but I'm not so sure there is any method to the madness. When all is said and done when the outside main relaxes what is left?
 
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lwto

Hall of Fame
#16
Definitely not a big fan of using awls. I just finished up string 10 Tecnifibre rackets and the grommet hole are ver small except for the tie offs. You have to be careful pulling the strings out so you don't take the grommet out too and new strings that are mushroomed on the tips won't even go in. When you have grommets like that I would not want to jam an awl in there.

As far as wiggling the strings it will average out the tensions but I'm not sure I'd want to do that either. I would rather have all the loss on the outside mains. One good thing is I believe the OP said he strung with a hybrid setup. Poly mains should make for less drawback.

Someone mentioned using a Yonex loop earlier. If you're using flying clamps that's an excellent idea if you have a starting clamp or a triple. Placing two flying clamps on the final string clamped to the mains on each side should greatly reduce drawback due to the flying clamp twisting.
I"m pretty familiar with the Yonex loop as I string a number of badminton racquets. In fact, today, I tried it on a racquet just to try.

1st, it takes a little more string than normal as you are adding more string around the outside.
2nd, Though the outside main was noticeably tighter, the end main on the loop is a little looser.

Come to the conclusion that it matters not, the end piece is going to be a little looser., Naturally it will feel looser as the poster above alluded, there is no other string on the other side.

A benefit perhaps is that you may get a bigger sweetspot as you are using more string.. I don't know.
 
#17
The only time I use the Yonex loop is when the tie off for the main is on a lower numbered main (such as when the 7th main ties off on the 6th main.) that way you always use the same amount of string and because the tie is closer to the clamp there is less limp string for the tie off so although you loose some tension on the 7th main it is not as much as you could loose on the 8th.
 
#18
I"m pretty familiar with the Yonex loop as I string a number of badminton racquets. In fact, today, I tried it on a racquet just to try.

1st, it takes a little more string than normal as you are adding more string around the outside.
That isn't necessarily the case.
It may seem that way initially, IF you only focus on the longer section/run where you jump from, say the 6th main over to the 8th.

In reality, it uses the same amount of string. It just changes when and where the longer section occurs.
With the Yonex Loop, the longer run (on the outside of the frame) merely happens sooner, rather than later (immediately before a tie-off).

Example:
On a POG with 16 mains (tie-offs are at 6T, with main skips at 8T & 8H).
After the first 6 mains are done on each side, you have 2 left for each side.
Normally, you now would do the 7th main (so "short loop" from 6T to 7T).
Next, you would do the last/8th main (so "short loop" from 7H to 9H, because of the skip at 8H).
Lastly, you then have a "long loop" from 9T back to 6T for the tie-off.

Now, with the Yonex Loop, after the 6th main you would skip over the 7th main and do the outside/8th main (so "long loop" from 6T to 9T).
Next, you would do the last/7th main (so "short loop" from 9H to 7H, again because of skip at 8H).
Lastly, you now have only a "short loop" from 7T to 6T for the tie-off.

So, in both cases, after the 6th main, you have 2 "short loops" and only 1 "long loop". Again, it just changes when and where those loops occur. Same amount of string though.


However, I can't speak to using it on badminton racquets, so it may be a different scenario with them. Therefore, your mileage may vary.
 
#19
That isn't necessarily the case.
It may seem that way initially, IF you only focus on the longer section/run where you jump from, say the 6th main over to the 8th...
Not necessarily always true. Take a Prince racket for instance. Many times the mains tie at 7H, so if you skip the 7th main you must not have a long section on the outside of the frame where normally you would not.
 
#20
I have heard a "10% rule" from experienced stringer. I mean last main 10% tighter for knot loss of tension. We measured DT and it was in line with table.
 
#23
so do you think difference is too little to bother?
Yes I do. The amount of drawback you have will determine how much you need to increase the stretch on your tie off string. How can 10% be right for all situations when different people are using different machines, knots, strings, and techniques. You probably have more or less tension loss than someone else. If you both increase by a magical percentage will they come out equal?
 
#24
This topic was gone over many times in the past.
For the question on knot drawback tension loss, I typically use the knot button on the machine, as that increases the tension by 10% for the one pull.
R. Parnell also commented on another stringers site that he uses that knot button as well, and he commented that this is why the machine manuf. puts it there.
Tim Strawn who is one of the original Wilson string team members also increases the tension for tie offs. The USRSA says it does not recommend tie off increases but also says it is acceptable if you decide to (this was e-mailed to me by USRSA a few years back, so it seems they are staying neutral on this) .
I increased tie offs even back in the 1960's when I first started stringing, as many clients judge your job by tugging on the outer main strings, (if they don't do this in front of you, they will later when they leave as I have seen this) , and yes I know the end mains will feel looser regardless due to the offset weave of the adjacent main, and has nothing to do with your job, but rather than get into a conversation with every client it is easier just to use that button, as it does keep the end mains straighter. No matter how well you snug up the knot there will be some drawback from the knot, and the 10% works for me, as the pitch when you pluck the tie off main sounds just like it should with the increase so it makes it closer to reference tension . It keeps the end mains straighter due to the offset weave of the adjacent main, and keeps clients happy that tug on those end mains.
This is a very controversial subject for sure.
Many comment that you do not hit with the end mains, and the end mains are shorter so should be less tension anyways as shorter strings deflect less.
Bottom line, just be consistent on what you do.
 
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#25
You're right Jim I've seen it lots of times. Your machine uses a percentage. Babolat uses a set number of pounds or Kg. Richard Parnell uses the knot button on the last two strings. USRSA says it is not necessary. Who do you believe?

Increasing tension on tie off will make the last tensioned string tighter. But I doubt anyone always makes up for what is lost and not always is tension lost. If one never tie off an outside main (Liam ATW) why would one want to increase tension? Because whether you tie off the outside main or not it will appear to be looser than the inside strings. I no longer use the knot button. I would if someone asked but no one ever has.
 
#26
You're right Jim I've seen it lots of times. Your machine uses a percentage. Babolat uses a set number of pounds or Kg. Richard Parnell uses the knot button on the last two strings. USRSA says it is not necessary. Who do you believe?

I believe Jim E :)
 
#27
I don't think it matters in the grand scheme of things. I have done SBS measurements on the RDC on this and the results were the same. I got in the habit of not increasing the tension on the last mains years ago on my older machines with no knot button because I would forget to set the tension back sometimes. Of course this is "knot" an issue with newer electronic machines. I am not sure I see any practical benefits of doing it, except for people who will tug at the outside mains to try to gauge stringing quality. But like one poster say, it will always be looser with only a single adjacent main string.
 
#28
You're right Jim I've seen it lots of times. Your machine uses a percentage. Babolat uses a set number of pounds or Kg. Richard Parnell uses the knot button on the last two strings. USRSA says it is not necessary. Who do you believe?

Increasing tension on tie off will make the last tensioned string tighter. But I doubt anyone always makes up for what is lost and not always is tension lost. If one never tie off an outside main (Liam ATW) why would one want to increase tension? Because whether you tie off the outside main or not it will appear to be looser than the inside strings. I no longer use the knot button. I would if someone asked but no one ever has.
Irvin, I string way more 2 piece than one piece, so my end mains are typically tied off. With many hybrid stringing and many racquet manuf. preferring 2 piece, and I string a lot of nat. gut, so most of my stringing is 2 piece, and all consistent that way as well.Also once you have a base of customers and they are 2 piece, it is reasonable to keep the same.I have yet to have someone specify 1 or 2 piece stringing, so I make that decision.
 
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#29
Jim I have no issues at all with increasing tension on the outside mains if anyone wants to do it. Just always do it the same for consistency.

But the topic was how to keep tension on the outside mains. Using the UKRSA ATW pattern the outside mains are not tied off. Liam Nolam says, it's "simple to learn and 100% effective without compromising the dynamic string tension of the outer mains." [Ref: http://tennis-lessons.wonderhowto.com/how-to/use-ukrsas-atw-pattern-for-tennis-racket-244021/]

The reason the outside mains are not compromised is because they are never tied off. But just the other day I strung two 6.1 90s using this pattern and afterward checked the tension on all mains in both rackets with a Stringmeter. All mains were within 2 lbs of reference tension except for the two outside mains in both rackets which were about 10 lbs low.

I don't think the issue is tension loss but more the fact there is no other outside string keeping it from moving so it will feel looser. So the question is whether or not there really is tension loss or is it just player perception. Even when you tug on your outside mains (with you increased tension) you will have the same issue. If it makes you or your customers feel better then by all means do it there's certainly nothing wrong with it.
 
#30
It is a "pick your poison" scenario. You are going to have two strings that will be looser best cast scenario. With some around the world patterns, they will now be the top and bottom crosses. Or an outside main and a cross, etc.
 
#31
I'm not sure I agree with that BGS. Seems like when I tie of the top and bottom crosses only I have very little if any drawback and no slip at all on the knot. I attribute that to the stringbed being must stiffer because are string are in and tensioned when tying off those two crosses.
 
#32
Stringing for a person and they complained their last mains were too loose. Their racquet only skipped one cross though unlike what I'm used to on 16x19 skipping two times like 7th and 9th grommet on mains.

Their last main ended up looser than usual so is this fine or you think it will affect play at all? I use the Parnell knot to tie off mains.
 
#33
Stringing for a person and they complained their last mains were too loose. Their racquet only skipped one cross though unlike what I'm used to on 16x19 skipping two times like 7th and 9th grommet on mains.

Their last main ended up looser than usual so is this fine or you think it will affect play at all? I use the Parnell knot to tie off mains.
I don't often get complaints about loose strings. Occasionally, someone will come in to pick up a racquet and tug an outside main or outside cross and make some sort of remark. My response is that payment is not optional. I allow people to pay when they pickup as a courtesy, not as an invitation to critique my work and decide if I deserve payment. If they don't like the way the racquet plays, next time go somewhere else. But payment is mandatory.

Also, I don't use the Parnell knot. With the royalty rate now up to $0.03 per knot and me stringing over 3000 racquets/yr, that got to be pretty expensive. Are you paying him by Paypal or just mailing your checks in? Paypal has just been killing me lately with the transaction fees on UK orders.
 
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#34
I have never been able to keep the strings that are tie offs at ref tension. The piece of string between the clamp and the tie off hole is never going to be at ref tension. You can work on your knots all you want [or work on your cinching techniques], but you absolutely cannot get 'that piece of string' up to ref tension.When I remove the holding clamp, the tensioned string loses tension because of that piece of string. FWIW, if I increase tension by 10%, the tension loss is less, but still there. However, I have noticed that RT does not seem to hear that the tie off strings are at a lower tension. I would not worry about it. If it bothers you, increase the ref tension on your tie offs by at least 10%. It is a personal issue.
 
#35
Stringing for a person and they complained their last mains were too loose. Their racquet only skipped one cross though unlike what I'm used to on 16x19 skipping two times like 7th and 9th grommet on mains.

Their last main ended up looser than usual so is this fine or you think it will affect play at all? I use the Parnell knot to tie off mains.
Use a Yonex Loop, string the first 6 mains on each side then the 8th then the 7th. Increase tension by 8 lbs on the outer 2 mains on each side. But you can’t use the Yonex Loop is the tie off is at 7th grommet hole.

The normal tension on the outer main will be down several lbs just from the angle of the pull on the outer main, and because you have a longer length of string between the 6th and 9th grommet you need more tension on the outer main. You will have drawback tension loss on the 7th main when you tie off hence the extra tension on the 7th main. This is all assuming you are stringing 2 piece.
 
#36
I don't often get complaints about loose strings. Occasionally, someone will come in to pick up a racquet and tug an outside main or outside cross and make some sort of remark. My response is that payment is not optional. I allow people to pay when they pickup as a courtesy, not as an invitation to critique my work and decide if I deserve payment. If they don't like the way the racquet plays, next time go somewhere else. But payment is mandatory.
I don't run a business, its for a friend and he's the only one who was curious about the last mains being loose. I told him cause his Babolat AeroPro Cortex racquet had only one skipped cross, or at least that's why I believe it was less tighter than ones with two skips.

Use a Yonex Loop, string the first 6 mains on each side then the 8th then the 7th. Increase tension by 8 lbs on the outer 2 mains on each side. But you can’t use the Yonex Loop is the tie off is at 7th grommet hole.

The normal tension on the outer main will be down several lbs just from the angle of the pull on the outer main, and because you have a longer length of string between the 6th and 9th grommet you need more tension on the outer main. You will have drawback tension loss on the 7th main when you tie off hence the extra tension on the 7th main. This is all assuming you are stringing 2 piece.
That's a great point about the angle of the pull, I knew something threw off the outer mains. The looseness doesn't impact the playability but I guess he was just curious about it. I notice it on my racquets but I thought it was normal and never was concerned over it. I will definite try to increase the tension a few lbs next time I string, that's good advice.
 
#37
I have an unrelated question for you Irvin. I've watched your videos starting mains with flying clamps and no starting clamp and you mention you clamp in the dead center of the center mains.

I came across this video and this guy who says to clamp it closer to the throat. Do you think he is mistaken or what are your thoughts? Watch at 6:25 mins.


 
#38
I have an unrelated question for you Irvin. I've watched your videos starting mains with flying clamps and no starting clamp and you mention you clamp in the dead center of the center mains.

I came across this video and this guy who says to clamp it closer to the throat. Do you think he is mistaken or what are your thoughts? Watch at 6:25 mins.
I doubt that it matters as long as there is enough room to get the clamp between the initial clamp and the frame.
 
#39
Whole lot of disagreeing over what the consensus seems to be a "non-issue". @mbrenner there are two things here. One, the outside main will feel "looser" because there's nothing outside of it. This allows it to be moved easier than the mains in the interior. I would explain that to anyone who questions the tension. Second, you can add 10 pounds to your last pull to help negate any lost tension due to the tie off. In either event, the overall effect on the string bed/final product is negligible.
 
#40
Stringing for a person and they complained their last mains were too loose. Their racquet only skipped one cross though unlike what I'm used to on 16x19 skipping two times like 7th and 9th grommet on mains.

Their last main ended up looser than usual so is this fine or you think it will affect play at all? I use the Parnell knot to tie off mains.
Based on your next question to Irvin I assume you are using flying clamps. When I had flying clamps (gamma composite) and switched to fixed I noticed the fixed clamps hold much more tension … this is much more noticeable on the tie off strings because tension is never pulled again. Add 5-8lbs like others have mentioned and this will help a little if it bothers you or your customer.

If you are really worried you could invest in a Stringway triple clamp, it does a better job than a regular flying clamp at holding tension.
 
#41
@NuBas I just realized from @gmatheis post you probably have flying clamps. That means you probably don’t use a Yonex loop because it would be hard to get the 6th and 8th main clamped together. A Stringway Triple would help there because it will clamp two strings spaced farther apart. Then when you clamp your final main, no matter where it is, with flying clamp and release the tensioner the drawback will be greater because the clamp will twist. Again a triple clamp will help because it clamp 3 string and especially if the last main tension is in the center of the clamp twisting and drawback is almost eliminated.

There are also other options depending on what you do or don’t have so maybe it would be better to discuss what you do have and work from there.
 
#42
@NuBas I just realized from @gmatheis post you probably have flying clamps. That means you probably don’t use a Yonex loop because it would be hard to get the 6th and 8th main clamped together. A Stringway Triple would help there because it will clamp two strings spaced farther apart. Then when you clamp your final main, no matter where it is, with flying clamp and release the tensioner the drawback will be greater because the clamp will twist. Again a triple clamp will help because it clamp 3 string and especially if the last main tension is in the center of the clamp twisting and drawback is almost eliminated.

There are also other options depending on what you do or don’t have so maybe it would be better to discuss what you do have and work from there.
Gamma X-2 dropweight with only flying clamps. Outer mains I can take care of by increasing a few pounds but again it doesn't bug me much, just one friend asked about it since it was his first coming to me.
Starting the mains, I was just curious if it mattered where you place the clamp.

BTW is there a difference between Parnell or Wilson Pro Knot tying off mains?
 
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#43
Gamma X-2 dropweight with only flying clamps. Outer mains I can take care of by increasing a few pounds but again it doesn't bug me much, just one friend asked about it since it was his first coming to me.
Starting the mains, I was just curious if it mattered where you place the clamp.

BTW is there a difference between Parnell or Wilson Pro Knot tying off mains?
Parnell is bulkier. For worn out grommets, a Wilson pro knot may be a risky choice...
 
#44
Gamma X-2 dropweight with only flying clamps. Outer mains I can take care of by increasing a few pounds but again it doesn't bug me much, just one friend asked about it since it was his first coming to me.
When you increase tension on the outer main it will just cause more drawback. The more you add the more you loose so to say. Because you have the X-2 you have a wider clamp than most which will also tend to twist less and cause less drawback. Another option to increase tension a lot on the outer mains is to use an ATW pattern.
BTW is there a difference between Parnell or Wilson Pro Knot tying off mains?
The Parnell knot creates more friction and will not slip as much and the Pro knot does. The 2 knots are both just an overhand knot if you really look at them. The Parnell goes around the anchor string 2 times and the Pro just once. The Parnell knot has more bulk than the Pro knot because of the loop around the anchor string twice.
 
#45
Stringing for a person and they complained their last mains were too loose. Their racquet only skipped one cross though unlike what I'm used to on 16x19 skipping two times like 7th and 9th grommet on mains.

Their last main ended up looser than usual so is this fine or you think it will affect play at all? I use the Parnell knot to tie off mains.
I was stringing 2 rackets this morning (Drive Lite and Pure Drive Lite) with Red Code Was and strung them at 23.5 Kg. Both are 16 main but one skips 8 H&T the other 7&9 H&T. I decided to use a Yonex Loop on both (normally that’s a no no when main skip 7&9 and if you have issues with double blocked holes never do that) and because I was using a poly string which tens to loop on the outside of the frame I wanted to loop the string around the anchor string. (See https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/the-parnell-loop-does-anyone-do-this.632037/)

I also set the knot function to +8 lbs and tensioned the 2 outer mains on each side with the knot function (23.5 Kg +8 lbs.) After string the mains and tying off (no crosses in either racket) I measured the tension with a Stringmeter on the 7-9 mains on each side of both rackets at 40 lbs, 35 lbs, and 38 lbs (both frames on both sides) then finished string the crosses top down.

When I finished stringing I tested the outer mains by just pulling them out to the side. They are tighter than normal and the 7th main on each side of each racket is the loosest. The outside mains are tighter than the 7th mains but not as tight as the 6th mains.

Had I strung the mains normally (no Yonex Loop, no loopin behind the anchor string, and no knot tension) no doubt in my mind the outer mains would have been much looser than the method above by a long shot. IMO All three of these methods will help to raise tension on the outer mains. Whether or not it is better or worse to have a higher tension on the outer mains is a different story. Seems to me a lower tension on the shorter outer mains would make more sense but the customer said he wanted tighter outer mains.
 
#47
@Irvin never used or learned the Yonex loop so maybe one day I will try.
It requires clamping the outer mains before the next to last mains when stringing tennis rackets. It was developed for fragile badminton rackets and the outer mains were tensioned while double pull the last 2 mains. I guess you could do the same thing on tennis rackets using flying clamps but you should tug on string you’re tensioning to get the outer main up to tension.
 
#48
Also, I don't use the Parnell knot. With the royalty rate now up to $0.03 per knot and me stringing over 3000 racquets/yr, that got to be pretty expensive. Are you paying him by Paypal or just mailing your checks in? Paypal has just been killing me lately with the transaction fees on UK orders.
Is this a joke?!
 
#50
I thought on the USTA site they specifically say that the tension loss on the outer main/s is normal and should not be compensated for.
Tension loss on tie off strings is normal and if you want to adjust for it you can. The outer mains are not necessarily tied off all the time. Take for instance any ATW pattern, the outer mains are not tied off.

EDIT: There are also several different ways to compensate for tension loss on tie off strings.
 
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