How to learn General Relativity

FranzS

Rookie
I'd like to learn more about tensors and to fully grasp the math/meaning of Einstein's field equations. Any good material on YouTube or elsewhere? Video content would be better. I didn't find anything exhaustive... I have some very basic understanding of linear algebra and would like the course to start from there.
 

Harry_Wild

G.O.A.T.
I think you need advance calculus to begin! Calculus level found in last calculus math courses for engineering, pre-med majors! Of course you take the same calculus for mathematics majors but it more theorem based. I think it involves multivaribles, vectors and other stuff. It is the 4th calculus or last calculus course to full fill the math requirements for those majors. The 3” thick calculus book that has lots of graphs in small print size, with story problems exclusively. The test is 3 or 4 problems of the story type problem and have to show step by step how you worked out your answers. 2 hour long exam time.

Do a YouTube search and there are tons of tutorials on this subject too.
 
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Deleted member 770618

Guest
I'd like to learn more about tensors and to fully grasp the math/meaning of Einstein's field equations. Any good material on YouTube or elsewhere? Video content would be better. I didn't find anything exhaustive... I have some very basic understanding of linear algebra and would like the course to start from there.
Have you tried taking a MOOC? You can audit for free or pay for a certificate, there is lots of video content/lectures.


If this doesn't work out, there is other content that might satisfy your curiosity.
 

chic

Professional
If you have multivariable calculus and linear algebra training already the book

'A General Relativity Workbook' by Thomas A. Moore is pretty comprehensive.
 

SystemicAnomaly

Talk Tennis Guru
I think you need advance calculus to begin! Calculus level found in engineering, pre-med, courses..
How about checking out some lectures by Richard Feynman on this subject? Or a Physics for Poets class or resource? No need for all that pesky math to warp your mind or bog you down.
 

chic

Professional
If you have multivariable calculus and linear algebra training already the book

'A General Relativity Workbook' by Thomas A. Moore is pretty comprehensive.
I should also mention that most of the math you'll need is available for free on Khan academy. I don't know that they do gen rel and tensors specifically but I know they do a decent amount of grad level math on their channel
 
Are you looking to learn general relativity or learn about general relativity? For the former you need to make sure you know all the math and classical physics, which will require years of study if you haven't done it already. For the latter, there are probably books that provide an intuitive overview.
 

FranzS

Rookie
Are you looking to learn general relativity or learn about general relativity? For the former you need to make sure you know all the math and classical physics, which will require years of study if you haven't done it already. For the latter, there are probably books that provide an intuitive overview.
As per opening post, wanna really know all the math, etc. It's ok, I've indeed studied physics (university).
 
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Deleted member 770618

Guest
Do you prefer some early wooden racquets from the 19th century for your collection or some Babolat AeroGel Quantum Pro from 2047?
Hmm, maybe a copy of the WSJ 5 years from now, with a listing of stock prices? I would settle for a Quantum Pro though :)
 

Azure

G.O.A.T.
Why don't you enrol in a full university course if you really want to understand the math behind it? Engineering courses will certainly deal with tensors and vectors as well but you might actually involve yourself in a couple to three years of advanced courses to understand the math and apply it to solving problems of this sort.
 

nicklane1

Rookie
I find the following channel very useful.

This is fascinating. Watched just a little over 30mins so far. I've never seen such a simple explanation of general relativity. He then goes into differential calculus, which is so clear that the audience doesn't even know that's what he's talking about.
 
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