How To Master Any Tennis Stroke

#1
Attention all tennis students and players.

If you want to master any tennis stroke, then read this post and follow these instructions closely.

You see.

When learning any skill.

There is a learning curve that you have to go through.

So, your main objective as a student and my main goal as a coach is to...

Find a way to help you (leapfrog) that learning curve, so you can develop the stroke faster and then move on to another one.

The modern process you are about to learn is called.

Mushin Training.

Okay now that we are on the same page.

Here is the 3 tip process for mastering any tennis stroke.

First Stage is Imprinting.

Watch some video of the pros.

Then do shadow swings for at least 10 minutes.

And make sure that you are picturing yourself making the perfect shot on every swing.

You also want to be doing these swings slow and in the flow.

"Do them in the morning, before you practice and right before you go to bed. (This time is perfect because your subconscious mind can be working on the stroke while you sleep".

Here is a video you can use too.



Stage 2 is Repetition, Repetition and More Repetitions.

After you imprint the stroke on your subconscious mind by watching videos and doing shadow swings.

You need to start working the reps. And you need to make sure that you are working them the right way.

You have to leverage this time on the court, so you can develop and master your strokes quicker.

What I mean by this is... "You should never miss 3 reps in a row".

I see tennis students and players making this mistake on the court all the time.

Look.

If you miss the first one, make the needed adjustment on the next one.

Then if you miss the second one, adjust your swing again, but if you do miss that second one, make the last adjustment and make the 3rd one.

This is how you leverage the reps in practice.

By making each one count!!

You should be constantly making adjustments while doing the reps until you discover the stroke.

My coach used to say to us.

"When the student is ready, the stroke will appear".

Okay, the last and 3rd stage of this Mushin Training is...

Get out of your own way.

The last thing you need to do.

Is allow your subconscious mind to work through you on the court.

In the first stage, you imprinted the stroke on your subconscious mind. The second stage you leverage the reps.

Now, get out of your own way and let the process work for and through YOU.

The best part about using this Mushin Training process is...

It allows you to leapfrog the learning curve and discover the stroke faster.

Just like we talked about earlier in this post.

And that is how you can master any stroke.

How long does it take?

Well, that depends on you and how focused you are while working on this concept.

Please try it out soon and see for yourself though.

Share your results in the comment section too.

I promise you this.

How fast you get your results will surprise you, when you start using this concept.

Do this.

Use this modern day training concept to finally develop an around game for consistent solid competition.

Oh, I forgot too.

Happy New Year!!

And I hope to catch you on the court someday my friend!!
 
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#3
Attention all tennis students and players.

If you want to master any tennis stroke, then read this post and follow these instructions closely.

You see.

When learning any skill.

There is a learning curve that you have to go through.

So, your main objective as a student and my main goal as a coach is to...

Find a way to help you (leapfrog) that learning curve, so you can develop the stroke faster and then move on to another one.

The modern process you are about to learn is called.

Mushin Training.

Okay now that we are on the same page.

Here is the 3 tip process for mastering any tennis stroke.

First Stage is Imprinting.

Watch some video of the pros.

Then do shadow swings for at least 10 minutes.

And make sure that you are picturing yourself making the perfect shot on every swing.

You also want to be doing these swings slow and in the flow.

"Do them in the morning, before you practice and right before you go to bed. (This time is perfect because your subconscious mind can be working on the stroke while you sleep".

Here is a video you can use too.



Stage 2 is Repetition, Repetition and More Repetitions.

After you imprint the stroke on your subconscious mind by watch videos and doing shadow swings.

You need to start working the reps. And you need to make sure that you are working them the right way.

You have to leverage this time on the court, so you can develop and master your strokes quicker.

What I mean by this is... "You should never miss 3 reps in a row".

I see tennis students and players making this mistake on the court all the time.

Look.

If you miss the first one, make the needed adjustment on the next one.

Then if you miss the second one, adjust your swing again, but if you do miss that second one, make the last adjustment and make the 3rd one.

This is how you leverage the reps in practice.

By making each one count!!

You should be constantly making adjustments while doing the reps until you discover the stroke.

My coach used to say to us.

"When the student is ready, the stroke will appear".

Okay, the last and 3rd stage of this Mushin Training is...

Get out of your own way.

The last thing you need to do.

Is allow your subconscious mind to work through you on the court.

In the first stage, you imprinted the stroke on your subconscious mind. The second stage you leverage the reps.

Now, get out of your own way and let the process work for and through YOU.

The best part about using this Mushin Training process is...

It allows you to leapfrog the learning curve and discover the stroke faster.

Just like we talked about earlier in this post.

And that is how you can master any stroke.

How long does it take?

Well, that depends on you and how focused you are while doing working on this concept.

Please try it out soon and see for yourself though.

Share your results in the comment section too.

I promise you this.

How fast you get your results will surprise you, when you start using this concept.

Do this.

Use this modern day training concept to finally develop an around game for consistent solid competition.

Oh, I forgot too.

Happy New Year!!

And I hope to catch you on the court some day my friend!!
 
#7
First Stage is Imprinting.

Watch some video of the pros.

Then do shadow swings for at least 10 minutes.

And make sure that you are picturing yourself making the perfect shot on every swing.
1) What happens if I watch the video, but due to my inexperience and lack of expertise, fail to interpret things properly? After all, if I knew what I was looking for, I wouldn't need to watch the video in the first place (I'd already know).

2) Even if I happen to interpret things 100% correctly, what happens if I fail to transfer this knowledge to proper practice / execution? So (by some miracle) I actually do see and understand all aspects of Federer's stroke. But, I only "think" I'm doing what he's doing when it comes to execution. But, I'm actually practicing (and making habit), incorrect technique.

If you were actually my coach and I was paying you, as soon as you unveiled this strategy, I'd leave.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
#8
1) What happens if I watch the video, but due to my inexperience and lack of expertise, fail to interpret things properly? After all, if I knew what I was looking for, I wouldn't need to watch the video in the first place (I'd already know).

2) Even if I happen to interpret things 100% correctly, what happens if I fail to transfer this knowledge to proper practice / execution? So (by some miracle) I actually do see and understand all aspects of Federer's stroke. But, I only "think" I'm doing what he's doing when it comes to execution. But, I'm actually practicing (and making habit), incorrect technique.

If you were actually my coach and I was paying you, as soon as you unveiled this strategy, I'd leave.
ode to secrets
secrets are revealed
only after confusion
and after payment
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
#11
1) What happens if I watch the video, but due to my inexperience and lack of expertise, fail to interpret things properly? After all, if I knew what I was looking for, I wouldn't need to watch the video in the first place (I'd already know).

2) Even if I happen to interpret things 100% correctly, what happens if I fail to transfer this knowledge to proper practice / execution? So (by some miracle) I actually do see and understand all aspects of Federer's stroke. But, I only "think" I'm doing what he's doing when it comes to execution. But, I'm actually practicing (and making habit), incorrect technique.

If you were actually my coach and I was paying you, as soon as you unveiled this strategy, I'd leave.
And the coach would be better off without a student who argues just for the sake of arguing and has no interest in learning
 
#13
1) What happens if I watch the video, but due to my inexperience and lack of expertise, fail to interpret things properly? After all, if I knew what I was looking for, I wouldn't need to watch the video in the first place (I'd already know).

2) Even if I happen to interpret things 100% correctly, what happens if I fail to transfer this knowledge to proper practice / execution? So (by some miracle) I actually do see and understand all aspects of Federer's stroke. But, I only "think" I'm doing what he's doing when it comes to execution. But, I'm actually practicing (and making habit), incorrect technique.

That's no different from any other learning.

The resources are there but one still has to use his brain to digest them.




Some people get it, some get it faster than many and some never get it all their life. Well, this place is a good example. :)
 
#14
And the coach would be better off without a student who argues just for the sake of arguing and has no interest in learning
That's no different from any other learning.

The resources are there but one still has to use his brain to digest them.




Some people get it, some get it faster than many and some never get it all their life. Well, this place is a good example. :)
What am I paying the coach for?
 
#15
What am I paying the coach for?
(not necessarily answering for the OP)
But generally, a good coach points you to new things, correct things, and serve as a good reminder who has understood you better than any random folks. Come up with and implement programs for you where you don't have to.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
#16
That's no different from any other learning.

The resources are there but one still has to use his brain to digest them.




Some people get it, some get it faster than many and some never get it all their life. Well, this place is a good example. :)
r2473 is in the third category. Look for him to continue asking questions just to save face.
 
#17
(not necessarily answering for the OP)
But generally, a good coach points you to new things, correct things, and serve as a good reminder who has understood you better than any random folks. Come up with and implement programs for you where you don't have to.
Reconcile your statement with the OP.

Isn't the OP suggesting that I am the "good coach"? Thus my question. What if I'm not a "good coach" for myself? What if misinterpret the video? Or interpret it correctly, but fail to properly execute? Will I be successful? And if not, how valuable do you think his advice is?

Another way of saying this is, his argument is sound, but his premises are flawed. Specifically, it's unrealistic to think a (ignorant) student will be able to do what suggests. (And I mean ignorant in the "positive", not "normative" sense).
 
#18
r2473 is in the third category. Look for him to continue asking questions just to save face.
You believe that you can do what the OP suggests. But your tennis skill (based on video evidence) suggests this isn't true.

You are either not capable of distilling proper tennis technique on your own (from a video of a professional for example), or incapable of executing. Or both.

Unless you'd like to argue that you have professional level skills.

But one of these must be true. Which do think it is?

Unless you can play tennis at a professional level but just choose not to. Or, you could play tennis at a professional level, but simply choose not take the time to interpret and then implement the proper technique; instead preferring your current technique.

I'll be interested in your assessment of yourself as to which is the correct answer in your case.
 
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#20
You believe that you can do what the OP suggests. But your tennis skill (based on video evidence) suggests this isn't true.

You are either not capable of distilling proper tennis technique on your own (from a video of a professional for example), or incapable of executing. Or both.

Unless you'd like to argue that you have professional level skills.

But one of these must be true. Which do think it is? (Unless you can play tennis at a professional level but just choose not to).
Trying to explain tennis to sureshs is like explaining bbq to a pig. Can't work.
 
#21
Trying to explain tennis to sureshs is like explaining bbq to a pig. Can't work.
He seems to imply that he's capable of understanding and executing tennis (at a professional level?) on his own (from watching YouTube videos as the OP suggests, and interpreting and applying that knowledge on his own)

As such, he'd be foolish to listen to anyone else. He's acting rationally given his beliefs.

I make no (explicit) judgment on his beliefs. But for most people, this would almost certainly be a false belief.
 
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sureshs

Bionic Poster
#27
You are either not capable of distilling proper tennis technique on your own (from a video of a professional for example), or incapable of executing. Or both.
You are not capable of understanding any more than the 2 or 3 alternatives you can dream of which you think are the only possibilities. It is like arguing whether the flat earth is a circle or a square.
 
#28
You are not capable of understanding any more than the 2 or 3 alternatives you can dream of which you think are the only possibilities. It is like arguing whether the flat earth is a circle or a square.
Are you going to plainly state the other alternatives?

And then argue for the one you favor? With the requisite support for the argument?
 
#30
Read Dunning-Kruger effect
Not only do I lack the expertise to be my own coach in tennis, but I also lack expertise on this as well.

As such, if you want to properly advance your argument, you'll have to be the teacher. If you choose to remain n!ggardly with your wisdom, then I'll have to suffer in ignorance. Not very nice of you.

And please, don't forget what the actual argument is about. Dunning-Kruger is just some sort of justification for your argument; not the argument itself. So we have to understand:

1) What is Dunning-Kruger
2) How does it relate to the actual argument
3) If we will accept/reject Dunning-Kruger as justification (for whatever it is you are arguing.....which still remains unstated).

This is getting complicated. But if we are patient and stay the course, I'm sure we'll reach a solution soon.
 
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#36
1) What happens if I watch the video, but due to my inexperience and lack of expertise, fail to interpret things properly? After all, if I knew what I was looking for, I wouldn't need to watch the video in the first place (I'd already know).

2) Even if I happen to interpret things 100% correctly, what happens if I fail to transfer this knowledge to proper practice / execution? So (by some miracle) I actually do see and understand all aspects of Federer's stroke. But, I only "think" I'm doing what he's doing when it comes to execution. But, I'm actually practicing (and making habit), incorrect technique.

If you were actually my coach and I was paying you, as soon as you unveiled this strategy, I'd leave.
You are thinking too lowly of yourself.
 
#39
Thanks rrortiz5! for letting me know about this post

It is about repetition but repetition needs to be optimized. I have done a huge amount of academic research on this. There is an optimal way to repeat the repetitions. First see the ITF article in this link (page 18). https://en.coaching.itftennis.com/media/284860/284860.pdf
My book has much more detail “Muscle Memory and Imagery: Better Tennis” (Amazon Books). There need to be purpose and structure to the repetition (see ITF link).

For example, a student hits 250 forehands during practice. 25 are hit poorly as you warm up. The next 200 are hit in a mediocre fashion (the “so-so stroke” you want to improve). Then 25 are hit well because you have improved. One then tends to start another stroke. But what have you taught your muscle memory to do. The result is that you have trained your motor memory to hit poorly, or reinforced your mediocre “so-so” stroke 90% of the time. Little wonder one ends up hitting like always the next day. Science suggests a better way (but alas , this is only theory albeit backed up by several anecdotal reports).
 
#41
Attention all tennis students and players.

If you want to master any tennis stroke, then read this post and follow these instructions closely.

You see.

When learning any skill.

There is a learning curve that you have to go through.

So, your main objective as a student and my main goal as a coach is to...

Find a way to help you (leapfrog) that learning curve, so you can develop the stroke faster and then move on to another one.

The modern process you are about to learn is called.

Mushin Training.

Okay now that we are on the same page.

Here is the 3 tip process for mastering any tennis stroke.

First Stage is Imprinting.

Watch some video of the pros.

Then do shadow swings for at least 10 minutes.

And make sure that you are picturing yourself making the perfect shot on every swing.

You also want to be doing these swings slow and in the flow.

"Do them in the morning, before you practice and right before you go to bed. (This time is perfect because your subconscious mind can be working on the stroke while you sleep".

Here is a video you can use too.



Stage 2 is Repetition, Repetition and More Repetitions.

After you imprint the stroke on your subconscious mind by watch videos and doing shadow swings.

You need to start working the reps. And you need to make sure that you are working them the right way.

You have to leverage this time on the court, so you can develop and master your strokes quicker.

What I mean by this is... "You should never miss 3 reps in a row".

I see tennis students and players making this mistake on the court all the time.

Look.

If you miss the first one, make the needed adjustment on the next one.

Then if you miss the second one, adjust your swing again, but if you do miss that second one, make the last adjustment and make the 3rd one.

This is how you leverage the reps in practice.

By making each one count!!

You should be constantly making adjustments while doing the reps until you discover the stroke.

My coach used to say to us.

"When the student is ready, the stroke will appear".

Okay, the last and 3rd stage of this Mushin Training is...

Get out of your own way.

The last thing you need to do.

Is allow your subconscious mind to work through you on the court.

In the first stage, you imprinted the stroke on your subconscious mind. The second stage you leverage the reps.

Now, get out of your own way and let the process work for and through YOU.

The best part about using this Mushin Training process is...

It allows you to leapfrog the learning curve and discover the stroke faster.

Just like we talked about earlier in this post.

And that is how you can master any stroke.

How long does it take?

Well, that depends on you and how focused you are while doing working on this concept.

Please try it out soon and see for yourself though.

Share your results in the comment section too.

I promise you this.

How fast you get your results will surprise you, when you start using this concept.

Do this.

Use this modern day training concept to finally develop an around game for consistent solid competition.

Oh, I forgot too.

Happy New Year!!

And I hope to catch you on the court some day my friend!!
Love your approach. So very similar to mine except I really emphasize video ( worded a bit different too - of course)

The “5 Minute Home Workout”- do twice per day, esp before bedtime. Technique and consistency is Everything!

  • 1 minute watching video of how it should be properly done (your choice of who)
  • 1 minute using some type of Imagery: Internal, External, and/or Kinesthetic
  • 3 minutes Tai Chi strokes progressing to normal speed shadow swings (video yourself to be sure you are doing what you think)
On court progressions
Do The “5 minute Home Workout”
  • 30 drop feeds to target from short, then 30 mid-court, then 30 from deep court 30 second (video yourself to be sure you are doing what you think)
  • Ball machine feeds to target
    • Video yourself 1-2 minutes (just lean your phone against a water bottle)
  • After one ball machine load, watch your video (almost a guarantee you will notice all kinds of things you need to correct)
  • Repeat ball machine load with video
 
#44
Thanks rrortiz5! for letting me know about this post

It is about repetition but repetition needs to be optimized. I have done a huge amount of academic research on this. There is an optimal way to repeat the repetitions. First see the ITF article in this link (page 18). https://en.coaching.itftennis.com/media/284860/284860.pdf
My book has much more detail “Muscle Memory and Imagery: Better Tennis” (Amazon Books). There need to be purpose and structure to the repetition (see ITF link).

For example, a student hits 250 forehands during practice. 25 are hit poorly as you warm up. The next 200 are hit in a mediocre fashion (the “so-so stroke” you want to improve). Then 25 are hit well because you have improved. One then tends to start another stroke. But what have you taught your muscle memory to do. The result is that you have trained your motor memory to hit poorly, or reinforced your mediocre “so-so” stroke 90% of the time. Little wonder one ends up hitting like always the next day. Science suggests a better way (but alas , this is only theory albeit backed up by several anecdotal reports).
You said a lot there and you can say it with fewer words, my friend. Like (make every REP count for your self-correction in practice until you discover the stroke).
 

heninfan99

Talk Tennis Guru
#46
A MMA fighter told me about this research but it hasn't been my experience. What has worked for me is reps until I'm so tired I'm falling over, the stroke attempt or new maneuver attempt is sloppy and wild from tiredness. Very much like the feeling of lifting until muscle failure to build muscle. Then take a break and upon getting back to the next attempt it's there, it's learned.

Thanks rrortiz5! for letting me know about this post

It is about repetition but repetition needs to be optimized. I have done a huge amount of academic research on this. There is an optimal way to repeat the repetitions. First see the ITF article in this link (page 18). https://en.coaching.itftennis.com/media/284860/284860.pdf
My book has much more detail “Muscle Memory and Imagery: Better Tennis” (Amazon Books). There need to be purpose and structure to the repetition (see ITF link).

For example, a student hits 250 forehands during practice. 25 are hit poorly as you warm up. The next 200 are hit in a mediocre fashion (the “so-so stroke” you want to improve). Then 25 are hit well because you have improved. One then tends to start another stroke. But what have you taught your muscle memory to do. The result is that you have trained your motor memory to hit poorly, or reinforced your mediocre “so-so” stroke 90% of the time. Little wonder one ends up hitting like always the next day. Science suggests a better way (but alas , this is only theory albeit backed up by several anecdotal reports).
 
#47
You said a lot there and you can say it with fewer words, my friend. Like (make every REP count for your self-correction in practice until you discover the stroke).
Yep! Have to agree! However, sometimes you need to sell the ‘few words’ so people understand the importance of the of the concept !
only the good reps
will count toward mastery
so practice practice
 
#48
only the good reps
will count toward mastery
so practice practice



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
To be more brief this time:

Law #4 – Repetition by doing it right is how you hit good strokes during a match

In order to train yourself to hit good strokes, the ones that win points, most of the practice strokes you hit must be good. Forget about immediate results. Repeatedly hitting good strokes (better than your usual stuff) is the way to get results that matter – the ones that make for a winning difference in your matches. The ones that stay with you over time.
 
#49
A MMA fighter told me about this research but it hasn't been my experience. What has worked for me is reps until I'm so tired I'm falling over, the stroke attempt or new maneuver attempt is sloppy and wild from tiredness. Very much like the feeling of lifting until muscle failure to build muscle. Then take a break and upon getting back to the next attempt it's there, it's learned.
I like a lot, but stop the reps before your technique begins to suffer - either physical or mental. Repetition of poor technique is not what you want
 
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